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Feeling vital after a good night's sleep: The interplay of energetic resources and self-efficacy for daily proactivity.

Published on Oct 1, 2017in Journal of Occupational Health Psychology 5.13
· DOI :10.1037/ocp0000041
Antje Schmitt12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Kassel),
Frank D. Belschak17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UvA: University of Amsterdam),
Deanne N. Den Hartog44
Estimated H-index: 44
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
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Abstract
This study aims to investigate the role of daily vitality as an energy-based mechanism through which sleep quantity and quality relate to proactive behavior. In addition, we propose that daily self-efficacy forms a contingency condition in that self-efficacy facilitates the translation of vitality into proactive behavior. We conducted a 7-day diary study based on a sample of 66 employees who completed surveys 3 times daily. We used multilevel regression analyses to test the hypotheses while controlling for the 1-day lagged measures of vitality and proactivity. The results provide evidence for a model of moderated mediation. Sleep quality but not quantity predicted an increase in daily vitality. Self-efficacy moderated the relationship between vitality and daily proactivity such that this relationship was stronger when self-efficacy was reported to be high rather than low. The conditional effect mediated by vitality was significant for sleep quality but not for sleep quantity and occurred at the within-person level of analysis. These results suggest that organizations aiming to boost daily proactivity in employees can benefit from increasing employees’ self-efficacy and supporting them in developing strategies to ensure sufficient vitality. One such strategy is improving sleep quality. This study extends the literature on dynamics in proactive work behavior and its well-being-related antecedents by exploring both vitality as an underlying energetic mechanism and daily self-efficacy as a boundary condition. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
  • References (75)
  • Citations (8)
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References75
Newest
Antje Schmitt12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Kassel),
Deanne N. Den Hartog44
Estimated H-index: 44
(UvA: University of Amsterdam),
Frank D. Belschak17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
This study explores the role of work engagement as an affective–motivational mechanism through which transformational leadership may relate to proactive behaviour. In line with a resource-based approach (Hobfoll, 1989), we hypothesize that employees only invest resources provided through work engagement into proactivity when job strain is low. Under conditions of high job strain, work engagement is less likely to translate into proactive behaviours. In contrast, for core task-related job perform...
Published on Aug 1, 2015in Journal of Organizational Behavior 5.00
Sabine Sonnentag56
Estimated H-index: 56
(UMA: University of Mannheim),
Anita Starzyk1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UMA: University of Mannheim)
Summary This paper examines the role of affect as a linking mechanism between experiences at work (perceived prosocial impact and situational constraints) and two distinct components of proactive work behavior (issue identification and implementation). Based on a dual-tuning perspective, we argue that both positive affect and negative affect can be beneficial for proactive work behavior. Multi-level path analysis using daily-survey data from 153 employees showed that perceived prosocial impact p...
Published on Aug 1, 2014in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Verena C. Hahn5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Mainz),
Carmen Binnewies17
Estimated H-index: 17
(WWU: University of Münster),
Christian Dormann28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Mainz)
Abstract This multi-source diary study examined the role of partners for employees' daily recovery in a sample of dual-earner couples. We hypothesized that employees' daily psychological detachment from work during the evening should be positively associated with their partners' daily psychological detachment during the evening. Employees' affective well-being (serenity and negative activation) at bedtime should be influenced not only by their own psychological detachment, but also by their part...
Published on Jul 1, 2014in Journal of Management 9.06
Jonathon R. B. Halbesleben34
Estimated H-index: 34
(UA: University of Alabama),
Jean-Pierre Neveu2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Montpellier)
+ 1 AuthorsMina Westman27
Estimated H-index: 27
(TAU: Tel Aviv University)
Proposed as a theory of motivation, the basic tenet of conservation of resources (COR) theory is that humans are motivated to protect their current resources and acquire new resources. Despite its recent popularity in the organizational behavior literature, several criticisms of the theory have emerged, primarily related to the central concept of resources. In this review, we address concerns regarding the conceptualization, conservation, acquisition, fluctuation, and measurement of resources. W...
Published on Jul 1, 2014in Journal of Management 9.06
Reeshad S. Dalal25
Estimated H-index: 25
(GMU: George Mason University),
Devasheesh P. Bhave14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Singapore Management University),
John Fiset4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Concordia University)
Although both researchers and practitioners know that an employee’s performance varies over time within a job, this within-person performance variability is not well understood and in fact is often treated as error. In the current paper, we first identify the importance of a within-person approach to job performance and then review several extant theories of within-person performance variability that, despite vastly different foci, converge on the contention that job performance is dynamic rathe...
Published on May 27, 2014in Academy of Management Journal 7.19
Michael Marcus Gielnik12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Matthias Spitzmuller10
Estimated H-index: 10
(NUS: National University of Singapore)
+ 2 AuthorsMichael Frese69
Estimated H-index: 69
(NUS: National University of Singapore)
Most theoretical frameworks in entrepreneurship emphasize that entrepreneurial passion drives entrepreneurial effort. We hypothesize that the reverse effect is also true, and investigate changes in passion as an outcome of effort. Based on theories of self-regulation and self-perception, we hypothesize that making new venture progress and free choice are two factors that help to explain why and under which conditions entrepreneurial effort affects entrepreneurial passion. We undertook two studie...
Klodiana Lanaj12
Estimated H-index: 12
(College of Business Administration),
Russell E. Johnson34
Estimated H-index: 34
(MSU: Michigan State University),
Christopher M. Barnes24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UW: University of Washington)
Smartphones have become a prevalent technology as they provide employees with instant access to work-related information and communications outside of the office. Despite these advantages, there may be some costs of smartphone use for work at night. Drawing from ego depletion theory, we examined whether smartphone use depletes employees’ regulatory resources and impairs their engagement at work the following day. Across two studies using experience sampling methodology, we found that smartphone ...
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Psychological Methods 8.19
G. John Geldhof11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Tufts University),
Kristopher J. Preacher21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University),
Michael J. Zyphur23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Melbourne)
Scales with varying degrees of measurement reliability are often used in the context of multistage sampling, where variance exists at multiple levels of analysis (e.g., individual and group). Because methodological guidance on assessing and reporting reliability at multiple levels of analysis is currently lacking, we discuss the importance of examining level-specific reliability. We present a simulation study and an applied example showing different methods for estimating multilevel reliability ...
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Journal of Applied Psychology 5.07
Heather M. Mullins3
Estimated H-index: 3
(GMU: George Mason University),
Jose M. Cortina28
Estimated H-index: 28
(GMU: George Mason University)
+ 1 AuthorsReeshad S. Dalal25
Estimated H-index: 25
(GMU: George Mason University)
Sleepiness, the biological drive to sleep, is an important construct for the organizational sciences. This physiological phenomenon has received very little attention in the organizational science literature in spite of the fact that it influences a wide variety of workplace behaviors. In this article, we develop a framework through which sleepiness can be fruitfully studied. We describe (a) what sleepiness is and how it can be differentiated conceptually from related concepts such as fatigue, (...
Published on Dec 1, 2013in Academy of Management Journal 7.19
Adam M. Grant44
Estimated H-index: 44
(UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)
Intense emotions such as frustration, anger, and dissatisfaction often drive employees to speak up. Yet the very emotions that spur employees to express voice may compromise their ability to do so constructively, preventing managers from reacting favorably. I propose that to speak up frequently and constructively, employees need knowledge about effective strategies for managing emotions. Building on theories of emotion regulation, I develop a theoretical model that explains the role of managing ...
Cited By8
Newest
Published on May 27, 2019in Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism 2.51
Shi Xu5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Surrey),
Jingna Wang (NKU: Nankai University)
Research has been extensively focusing on the overall mean levels of positive and negative emotions, while paying much less attention to how fluctuating they are across time. This research explores the impacts of employee emotional variability with emotional exhaustion as a potential mediator and psychological withdrawal and job satisfaction as outcomes. In a sample of 109 student employees working in two hotels, this study utilized experience sampling methodology to examine the effects of varia...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 2.79
Lisa Dieleman3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UGent: Ghent University),
Bart Soenens61
Estimated H-index: 61
(UGent: Ghent University)
+ 3 AuthorsSarah De Pauw10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UGent: Ghent University)
This study aimed to gain more insight in the sources of daily parenting among mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Specifically, we examined associations between daily variations in child behavior, mothers’ psychological needs, and mothers’ controlling and autonomy-supportive parenting. Moreover, the study examined the potential mediating role of daily vitality and stress within these associations. In total 41 mothers (Mage = 41.84 years) of children with ASD (Mage = 10.92 ye...
Susan L. Prescott57
Estimated H-index: 57
,
Alan C. Logan19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
David L. Katz41
Estimated H-index: 41
Experts in preventive medicine and public health have long-since recognized that health is more than the absence of disease, and that each person in the ‘waiting room’ and beyond manifests the social/political/economic ecosystems that are part of their total lived experience. The term planetary health—denoting the interconnections between the health of person and place at all scales—emerged from the environmental and preventive health movements of the 1970–1980s. Roused by the 2015 Lancet Commis...
Anna R. Ott (WWU: University of Münster), Verena C. Haun2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Mainz),
Carmen Binnewies17
Estimated H-index: 17
(WWU: University of Münster)
ABSTRACTThis day-level study examined the role of perceived organizational support (POS) in the context of employees’ negative work reflection during off-job time. We hypothesized that negative work reflection during off-job time should be indirectly related to reduced work engagement on the next workday through personal resources (i.e., vigour and self-efficacy) in the morning. In addition, we hypothesized that POS moderated the relationships between negative work reflection and personal resour...
Published on Nov 2, 2018in Frontiers in Psychology 2.13
Wendelien van Eerde15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UvA: University of Amsterdam),
Merlijn Venus4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
Background: This daily diary study investigates the relation between sleep quality during the night and its effect on procrastination at work during the next workday. Previous research has shown that sleep quality is an important variable for work behavior at the daily level, including employee performance, safety, health, and attitudes, such as work engagement. Also, sleep quality has been found to be negatively related to next-day work procrastination. However, these studies did not address tr...
Published on Jul 26, 2018in Challenges
Susan L. Prescott57
Estimated H-index: 57
,
Alan C. Logan19
Estimated H-index: 19
+ 12 AuthorsJohn Penders33
Estimated H-index: 33
The term planetary health—denoting the interdependence between human health and place at all scales—emerged from the environmental and preventive health movements of the 1970–80s; in 1980, Friends of the Earth expanded the World Health Organization definition of health, stating: “health is a state of complete physical, mental, social and ecological well-being and not merely the absence of disease—personal health involvesplanetary health”. Planetary health is not a new discipline; it is an extens...
Jana Kühnel9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UMA: University of Mannheim),
Sabine Sonnentag56
Estimated H-index: 56
(UMA: University of Mannheim)
+ 1 AuthorsKlaus G. Melchers16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Ulm)
Anne Casper3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UMA: University of Mannheim),
Sabine Sonnentag56
Estimated H-index: 56
(UMA: University of Mannheim),
Stephanie Tremmel2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UMA: University of Mannheim)
ABSTRACTIn this diary study, we extended knowledge on the role of employees’ stress mindset in the anticipatory phase of the stress process. We examined how workload anticipation is related to approach-coping efforts throughout the workday and how employees’ stress mindset moderates this relationship. Moreover, we investigated how approach-coping efforts are related to vigour and task performance at the end of the workday. Finally, we proposed conditional indirect effects of workload anticipatio...