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A Moderate Dose of Alcohol Does Not Influence Experience of Social Ostracism in Hazardous Drinkers

Published on Apr 20, 2016in Frontiers in Psychology 2.13
· DOI :10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00555
Joseph Buckingham1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCL: University College London),
Abigail Moss4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UCL: University College London)
+ 5 AuthorsTom P. Freeman20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UCL: University College London)
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Abstract
Anecdotal and correlational evidence suggests a relationship between social ostracism and alcohol dependence. Furthermore, a recent fMRI investigation found differences in the neural correlates associated with ostracism in people with alcohol dependence compared to healthy controls. We predicted that acutely administered alcohol would reduce the negative effects of social ostracism. Alcohol (0.4g/kg) or matched placebo was administered to a sample of 32 hazardous drinkers over two sessions in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. In each session, participants were exposed to an ostracism event via the computerized ball passing game, “Cyberball”. In order to quantify the effects of ostracism, the fundamental needs questionnaire was completed twice on each testing session; immediately after (i) social inclusion and (ii) social exclusion. Ostracism caused robust changes to scores on the fundamental needs questionnaire, in line with previous literature. Alcohol administration did not influence the effects of simulated social ostracism, which was supported by a Bayesian analysis. Exploratory analyses revealed a negative relationship between age and ostracism induced fundamental needs threat across both sessions. In conclusion, a moderate dose of alcohol did not influence experience of simulated social ostracism in hazardous drinkers. Further research is needed to establish the effects of alcohol administration on social ostracism using different doses and populations of alcohol users.
  • References (30)
  • Citations (36)
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References30
Newest
Published on May 29, 2015in PLOS ONE 2.78
C.H.J. Hartgerink7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Tilburg University),
Ilja van Beest11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Tilburg University)
+ 1 AuthorsKipling D. Williams K D55
Estimated H-index: 55
(Purdue University)
We examined 120 Cyberball studies (N = 11,869) to determine the effect size of ostracism and conditions under which the effect may be reversed, eliminated, or small. Our analyses showed that (1) the average ostracism effect is large (d > |1.4|) and (2) generalizes across structural aspects (number of players, ostracism duration, number of tosses, type of needs scale), sampling aspects (gender, age, country), and types of dependent measure (interpersonal, intrapersonal, fundamental needs). Furthe...
102 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 27, 2015in Social Psychology 1.36
Andrew H. Hales5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Purdue University),
Kipling D. Williams K D55
Estimated H-index: 55
(Purdue University),
Christopher I. Eckhardt28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Purdue University)
Alcohol is commonly used to cope with social pain, but its effectiveness remains unknown. Existing theories offer diverging predictions. Pain overlap theory predicts that because alcohol numbs physical pain it should also numb people to the negative effects of ostracism. Alcohol myopia predicts that because alcohol intensifies salient emotions it should enhance the negative effects of ostracism. We conducted a field experiment in a bar, exposing individuals to ostracism or inclusion using Cyberb...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2.97
Amy K. Bacon7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Alexi N. Cranford1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Heidemarie Blumenthal14
Estimated H-index: 14
Drinking to cope with negative affect is a drinking pattern that leads to problematic alcohol use both in college and after graduation. Despite theory and correlational evidence to this effect, establishing a link between stress and alcohol consumption among college students in the laboratory has yielded both a limited number of studies and, at times, inconsistent results. The present study attempts to resolve these issues through investigating the effects of an ecologically relevant stressor—os...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 3.66
Tom P. Freeman20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UCL: University College London),
Ravi K. Das15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UCL: University College London)
+ 1 AuthorsH. Valerie Curran7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UCL: University College London)
When addicted individuals are exposed to drug-related stimuli, dopamine release is thought to mediate incentive salience attribution, increasing attentional bias, craving and drug seeking. It is unclear whether dopamine acts specifically on drug cues versus other rewards, and if these effects correspond with craving and other forms of cognitive bias. Here, we administered the dopamine D2/D3 agonist pramipexole (0.5 mg) to 16 tobacco smokers in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design. ...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2014in Addiction Research & Theory 2.32
Sharon Rabinovitz13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Haifa)
This study was designed to examine whether social exclusion and anger affect alcohol consumption and value. Sixty participants who were excluded, provoked, and could then pour and consume beverages (labeled alcohol/juice), reported their perception of the beverages’ value. Social exclusion increased the influence of anger provocation on alcohol drinking. When participants received a restricted amount of the beverages as an evaluative target, social exclusion and anger provocation interacted on r...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2014in Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior 2.77
Charles G. Frye2
Estimated H-index: 2
(U of C: University of Chicago),
Margaret C. Wardle16
Estimated H-index: 16
(U of C: University of Chicago)
+ 1 AuthorsHarriet de Wit65
Estimated H-index: 65
(U of C: University of Chicago)
Abstract 3-4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) increases self-reported positive social feelings and decreases the ability to detect social threat in faces, but its effects on experiences of social acceptance and rejection have not been determined. We examined how an acute dose of MDMA affects subjective and autonomic responses to simulated social acceptance and rejection. We predicted that MDMA would decrease subjective responses to rejection. On an exploratory basis, we also examined the eff...
28 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2013in Psychopharmacology 3.42
Matthew G. Kirkpatrick19
Estimated H-index: 19
(U of C: University of Chicago),
Harriet de Wit65
Estimated H-index: 65
(U of C: University of Chicago)
Rationale Alcohol is usually consumed in social contexts. However, the drug has been studied mainly under socially isolated conditions, and our understanding of how social setting affects response to alcohol is limited.
26 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2.97
Sarah A. Buckingham1
Estimated H-index: 1
(LSBU: London South Bank University),
Daniel Frings8
Estimated H-index: 8
(LSBU: London South Bank University),
Ian P. Albery18
Estimated H-index: 18
(LSBU: London South Bank University)
Despite a growing interest in how group membership can positively impact health, little research has addressed directly the role social identity processes can have upon recovery from addiction. Drawing on social identity theory and self-categorization theory, the present study investigates how recovery group membership can introduce a new social identity associated with recovery, in comparison to the social identity associated with addiction. It was hypothesized that two processes, evaluative di...
57 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2012in Social Psychology Quarterly 1.75
Peggy A. Thoits35
Estimated H-index: 35
(IU: Indiana University Bloomington)
Theoretically, the more important a role-identity is to a person, the more it should provide a sense of purpose and meaning in life. Believing one’s life to be purposeful and meaningful should yield greater mental and physical well-being. These hypotheses are tested with respect to the volunteer role, specifically, Mended Hearts visitor, in which former heart patients visit current heart patients and their families in the hospital. Analyses of survey data from Mended Hearts visitors (N = 458) co...
72 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Journal of Abnormal Psychology 5.52
Bruce D. Bartholow31
Estimated H-index: 31
(MU: University of Missouri),
Erika A. Henry6
Estimated H-index: 6
(MU: University of Missouri)
+ 2 AuthorsPhillip K. Wood41
Estimated H-index: 41
(MU: University of Missouri)
Alcohol is known to impair self-regulatory control of behavior, though mechanisms for this effect remain unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that alcohol’s reduction of negative affect (NA) is a key mechanism for such impairment. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN), a component of the event-related brain potential (ERP) posited to reflect the extent to which behavioral control failures are experienced as distressing, while participants ...
96 Citations Source Cite
Cited By36
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Addictive Behaviors Reports
Amy K. Bacon7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Bradley University),
Blair Engerman (Bradley University)
Abstract Introduction Ostracism has only recently been investigated as a relevant social stressor that might precede college student alcohol use. The present study continues initial efforts to examine the effects of ostracism on subsequent alcohol consumption in the laboratory. A 2 (sex: male, female) × 2 (condition: ostracism, control) between-subjects experimental design was conducted to examine the effects of these variables on alcohol consumption in the laboratory. Methods Social drinking co...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.01
Chandni Hindocha10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UCL: University College London),
Tom P. Freeman20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UCL: University College London)
+ 7 AuthorsHv Curran22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UCL: University College London)
Acute nicotine abstinence in cigarette smokers results in deficits in performance on specific cognitive processes, including working memory and impulsivity which are important in relapse. Cannabidiol (CBD), the non-intoxicating cannabinoid found in cannabis, has shown pro-cognitive effects and preliminary evidence has indicated it can reduce the number of cigarettes smoked in dependent smokers. However, the effects of CBD on cognition have never been tested during acute nicotine withdrawal. The ...
2 Citations Source Cite