Match!

A component-centered meta-analysis of family-based prevention programs for adolescent substance use.

Published on Apr 1, 2016in Clinical Psychology Review9.90
· DOI :10.1016/j.cpr.2016.03.007
Mark J. Van Ryzin20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Oregon Research Institute),
Cary J. Roseth16
Estimated H-index: 16
(MSU: Michigan State University)
+ 2 AuthorsI-Chien Chen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(MSU: Michigan State University)
Cite
Abstract
Although research has documented the positive effects of family-based prevention programs, the field lacks specific information regarding why these programs are effective. The current study summarized the effects of family-based programs on adolescent substance use using a component-based approach to meta-analysis in which we decomposed programs into a set of key topics or components that were specifically addressed by program curricula (e.g., parental monitoring/behavior management,problem solving, positive family relations, etc.). Components were coded according to the amount of time spent on program services that targeted youth, parents, and the whole family; we also coded effect sizes across studies for each substance-related outcome. Given the nested nature of the data, we used hierarchical linear modeling to link program components (Level 2) with effect sizes (Level 1). The overall effect size across programs was .31, which did not differ by type of substance. Youth-focused components designed to encourage more positive family relationships and a positive orientation toward the future emerged as key factors predicting larger than average effect sizes. Our results suggest that, within the universe of family-based prevention, where components such as parental monitoring/behavior management are almost universal, adding or expanding certain youth-focused components may be able to enhance program efficacy.
  • References (44)
  • Citations (27)
Cite
References44
Newest
Published on Aug 11, 2015
Mark J. Van Ryzin20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
Gregory M. Fosco16
Estimated H-index: 16
Published on Oct 1, 2014in Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry6.13
Mark J. Van Ryzin20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UO: University of Oregon),
Thomas J. Dishion80
Estimated H-index: 80
(ASU: Arizona State University)
BACKGROUND: Early substance use co-occurs with youths' self-organization into deviant peer groups in which substance use is central to social interaction. We hypothesized that the social dynamics of deviant peer groups amplify the risk of progressing from early use to later dependence, and that this influence occurs over and above escalations in use that typically accompany early substance use and membership in deviant groups. METHODS: Our study used a longitudinal, multimethod dataset consistin...
Published on Dec 1, 2012in Addictive Behaviors2.96
Mark J. Van Ryzin20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UO: University of Oregon),
Gregory M. Fosco16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UO: University of Oregon),
Thomas J. Dishion80
Estimated H-index: 80
(UO: University of Oregon)
The focus of this study was social (i.e., family and peer) influences on substance use from early adolescence to early adulthood. A large, ethnically diverse sample of early adolescents (N = 998) was followed from age 12 to age 23. We tested direct and indirect effects of parental monitoring, family relationship quality, and association with deviant peers on change in substance use across time. Outcomes for tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use were analyzed as separate pathways within the same ov...
Published on May 1, 2012in Perspectives in Public Health3.03
David R. Foxcroft32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Oxford Brookes University),
Alexander Tsertsvadze27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Ottawa Hospital Research Institute)
Aims: Alcohol misuse by young people causes significant health and social harm, including death and disability. Therefore, prevention of youth alcohol misuse is a policy aim in many countries. Our aim was to examine the effectiveness of (1) school-based, (2) family-based and (3) multi-component universal alcohol misuse prevention programmes in children and adolescents.Methods: Three Cochrane systematic reviews were performed: searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Project CORK and the Cochrane R...
Published on Apr 1, 2012
Steve Hanson1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Jan 10, 2011in Annual Review of Psychology19.75
Irwin N. Sandler59
Estimated H-index: 59
,
Erin N. Schoenfelder8
Estimated H-index: 8
(ASU: Arizona State University)
+ 1 AuthorsDavid P. MacKinnon57
Estimated H-index: 57
(ASU: Arizona State University)
This article reviews findings from 46 randomized experimental trials of preventive parenting interventions. The findings of these trials provide evidence of effects to prevent a wide range of problem outcomes and to promote competencies from one to 20 years later. However, there is a paucity of evidence concerning the processes that account for program effects. Three alternative pathways are proposed as a framework for future research on the long-term effects of preventive parenting programs: (a...
Published on Jan 1, 2010
Lloyd D. Johnston71
Estimated H-index: 71
,
P. M. O’Malley33
Estimated H-index: 33
+ 1 AuthorsJohn E. Schulenberg67
Estimated H-index: 67
Published on Oct 22, 2008in Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse0.69
Robert Svensson Ma1
Estimated H-index: 1
ABSTRACT The purpose of this investigation is to analyse which risk factors in the family, school and peer domains have an effect on the use of different types of drugs (alcohol, tobacco and narcotics) and on frequencies of drug use. Another question to be addressed is whether the number of risk factors present also has an effect on the different dimensions of drug use. A total of 467 students aged 14–15 (234 boys and 233 girls) were included in the study and a series of multivariate logistic re...
Published on Oct 1, 2008in Drug and Alcohol Dependence3.47
Evelien Smit1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Jacqueline Verdurmen19
Estimated H-index: 19
+ 1 AuthorsFilip Smit54
Estimated H-index: 54
Aims: In order to quantify the effectiveness of family interventions in reducing adolescent drinking, we conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods: We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ERIC (Educational Research Information Center), Medline and PsycInfo for studies published between 1995 and September 2006. Summary estimates (OR and Cohen’s d) were derived from the difference in changed alcohol consumption between family intervention and control group...
Cited By27
Newest
Published on Jan 11, 2019in Addiction Research & Theory2.32
Francis Dalisay8
Estimated H-index: 8
(U.O.G.: University of Guam),
Wayne Buente1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa)
+ 2 AuthorsPallav Pokhrel18
Estimated H-index: 18
(U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa)
Published on Aug 27, 2019in Development and Psychopathology3.59
Tamika C. B. Zapolski13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Tianyi Yu21
Estimated H-index: 21
+ 2 AuthorsAllen W. Barton7
Estimated H-index: 7
Published on Aug 1, 2019in Addictive Behaviors2.96
Antonio A. Morgan-Lopez19
Estimated H-index: 19
(RTI International),
Elvira Elek12
Estimated H-index: 12
(RTI International)
+ 3 AuthorsThomas Clarke (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration)
Abstract The emerging dual threats of underaged drinking (UAD) and prescription drug misuse (PDM) require sustained prevention efforts across multiple levels of interventions. In response to the continuing proliferation of UAD and PDM among youth and young adults, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) developed the Partnerships for Success (PFS) program. Across five cohorts funded from 2012 to 2016, PFS created linkages between health care providers, treatment an...
Published on Feb 7, 2019in Prevention Science2.85
Emily J. LoBraico (PSU: Pennsylvania State University), Gregory M. Fosco16
Estimated H-index: 16
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
+ 3 AuthorsMark E. Feinberg41
Estimated H-index: 41
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
Family-based prevention programs increasingly are being disseminated and can be effective for an array of adolescent problem behaviors, including substance use initiation. Yet, we continue to have little understanding of how and why these programs work. Increased specificity in our understanding of what components drive program effects can facilitate refinement of programs, with potential for greater impact at a lower cost. Using attendance data, previously coded intervention components, and a p...
Published on Jul 15, 2019
Anthony Biglan51
Estimated H-index: 51
(Oregon Research Institute),
Mark J. Van Ryzin20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Oregon Research Institute)
This article reviews the evidence regarding behavioral science approaches to the prevention of substance use disorders. Prevention science grew out of research on family and school-based interventions that were designed to treat common behavioral problems of children and adolescents. That research showed that the amelioration of problems such as aggressive behavior could prevent the development of later problems including substance use, depression, and academic failure. We begin by reviewing evi...
Published on Dec 8, 2018in Prevention Science2.85
Flavio F. Marsiglia31
Estimated H-index: 31
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Stephanie L. Ayers12
Estimated H-index: 12
(ASU: Arizona State University)
+ 1 AuthorsArianna Weide (ASU: Arizona State University)
The purpose of this study was to assess the combined effectiveness of a parenting intervention, Families Preparing the New Generation (FPNG), and a youth curriculum, keepin’ it REAL (kiR), on substance use prevention for middle school students in a large urban metro area of the southwest USA. The study aimed to generate usable knowledge on what works in adolescent substance use prevention and how it works best—a combined parent and youth programming or parent-only programming. A total of 532 ado...
Lauren S. Wakschlag20
Estimated H-index: 20
(NU: Northwestern University),
Megan Y. Roberts9
Estimated H-index: 9
(NU: Northwestern University)
+ 8 AuthorsElizabeth Spencer Norton11
Estimated H-index: 11
(NU: Northwestern University)
Mental disorders are the predominant chronic diseases of youth, with substantial life span morbidity and mortality. A wealth of evidence demonstrates that the neurodevelopmental roots of common men...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of Pediatric Psychology2.67
Velma McBride Murry37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University),
Cady Berkel13
Estimated H-index: 13
(ASU: Arizona State University)
+ 1 AuthorsMarlena L Debreaux1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Journal of Adolescent Health3.96
Allen W. Barton7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UGA: University of Georgia),
Gene H. Brody77
Estimated H-index: 77
(UGA: University of Georgia)
+ 3 AuthorsKatherine B. Ehrlich13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UGA: University of Georgia)
Abstract Purpose The current study was designed to investigate the unique, long-term effects of family routines during adolescence on multiple developmental domains in young adulthood for rural African-Americans. Methods Prospective data were collected annually for 6 years from 504 rural African-American youth and their parents, beginning when the youth were 16 years of age. Results Results indicated that youth whose primary caregivers reported more family routines during adolescence (e.g., regu...