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Environmental variation and the demography and diet of thick-billed murres

Published on May 21, 2012in Marine Ecology Progress Series 2.36
· DOI :10.3354/meps09589
Paul A. Smith18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
Cite
Abstract
Conditions in arctic marine environments are changing rapidly, and understanding the link between environmental and demographic parameters could help to predict the conse- quences of future change for arctic seabirds. Over 20 yr (1988 to 2007), we studied colony atten- dance, adult survival and reproductive success of thick-billed murres, as well as the departure masses and diets of their chicks at Coats Island, Nunavut, Canada (62.95° N, 82.00° W). We eval- uated how each parameter responded to climatic conditions near the colony during the breeding season, and in the winter range during the non-breeding period (delineated using geolocation). We used the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and North Atlantic Oscillation indices, as well as local vari- ables to describe ice, oceanographic and weather conditions. We demonstrate that adult survival varied little among years but was higher after winters with lower AO indices, more ice in the south-western part of the winter range in spring, and cooler sea surface temperatures (SST). By comparison, interannual variation in breeding parameters (breeding success, chick mass and diet) was pronounced and responded to SST and ice conditions near the colony. Counts of birds attend- ing the colony, influenced heavily by pre-breeders, were most strongly related to the conditions that influenced adult survival; counts were positively related to ice concentration in the south- west of the winter range. Relationships between climatic conditions and demographic parameters were often lagged, suggesting effects mediated through the food web. The trend towards higher SST and less ice in the vicinity of the colony has not yet reduced reproductive success. However, a significant, ongoing decline in the rate of energy delivery to nestlings suggests that a critical threshold may eventually be crossed.
  • References (55)
  • Citations (24)
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References55
Newest
Published on May 21, 2012in Marine Ecology Progress Series 2.36
Jennifer F. Provencher14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UVic: University of Victoria),
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
+ 1 AuthorsH.G. Gilchrist7
Estimated H-index: 7
Seabird diet indicates changing Arctic marine communities in eastern Canada J. F. Provencher*, A. J. Gaston, P. D. O’Hara, H. G. Gilchrist Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3N5, Canada Science and Technology Branch, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3, Canada Canadian Wildlife Service, Sidney, British Columbia V8L 4B2, Canada
Published on Sep 1, 2011in Marine Biology 2.13
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Carleton University),
Paul A. Smith18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Carleton University)
+ 7 AuthorsRichard A. Phillips47
Estimated H-index: 47
(NERC: Natural Environment Research Council)
The non-breeding movements of marine birds were poorly known until recently, but this information is essential to understanding the risk to different geographical populations from events on the wintering grounds. We tracked the migration routes and wintering areas of Thick-billed Murre Uria lomvia from two breeding colonies in eastern Canada: Coats Island in northern Hudson Bay and The Minarets, Baffin Island, during the period August 2007–May 2008 using geolocation loggers. Birds from The Minar...
Published on Mar 5, 2011in Journal of Geophysical Research 3.23
Adrienne Tivy9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks),
Stephen E. L. Howell21
Estimated H-index: 21
(EC: Environment Canada)
+ 5 AuthorsJohn J. Yackel20
Estimated H-index: 20
(U of C: University of Calgary)
[1] The Canadian Ice Service Digital Archive (CISDA) is a compilation of weekly ice charts covering Canadian waters from the early 1960s to present. The main sources of uncertainty in the database are reviewed and the data are validated for use in climate studies before trends and variability in summer averaged sea ice cover are investigated. These data revealed that between 1968 and 2008, summer sea ice cover has decreased by 11.3% ± 2.6% decade−1 in Hudson Bay, 2.9% ± 1.2% decade−1 in the Cana...
Published on Feb 1, 2011in Global Change Biology 8.88
Paul Wassmann47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Tromsø),
Carlos M. Duarte103
Estimated H-index: 103
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)
+ 1 AuthorsMikael K. Sejr20
Estimated H-index: 20
(AU: Aarhus University)
In this article, we review evidence of how climate change has already resulted in clearly discernable changes in marine Arctic ecosystems. After defining the term ‘footprint’ and evaluating the availability of reliable baseline information we review the published literature to synthesize the footprints of climate change impacts in marine Arctic ecosystems reported as of mid-2009. We found a total of 51 reports of documented changes in Arctic marine biota in response to climate change. Among the ...
Carsten Egevang9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Iain J. Stenhouse11
Estimated H-index: 11
+ 3 AuthorsJanet R. D. Silk14
Estimated H-index: 14
(NERC: Natural Environment Research Council)
The study of long-distance migration provides insights into the habits and performance of organisms at the limit of their physical abilities. The Arctic tern Sterna paradisaea is the epitome of such behavior; despite its small size (<125 g), banding recoveries and at-sea surveys suggest that its annual migration from boreal and high Arctic breeding grounds to the Southern Ocean may be the longest seasonal movement of any animal. Our tracking of 11 Arctic terns fitted with miniature (1.4-g) geolo...
Published on Feb 1, 2010in Continental Shelf Research 2.13
Zou Zou A. Kuzyk15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Robie W. Macdonald66
Estimated H-index: 66
(UM: University of Manitoba)
+ 1 AuthorsGary A. Stern38
Estimated H-index: 38
(UM: University of Manitoba)
Abstract Elemental (carbon and nitrogen) ratios and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) are examined in sediments and suspended particulate matter from Hudson Bay to study the influence of river inputs and autochthonous production on organic matter distribution. River-derived particulate organic matter (POM) is heterogeneous, nitrogen-poor and isotopically depleted, consistent with expectations for OM derived from terrestrial C3 vascular plant sources, and distinct from...
Published on Sep 11, 2009in Science 41.04
Eric Post46
Estimated H-index: 46
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Mads C. Forchhammer31
Estimated H-index: 31
(AU: Aarhus University)
+ 22 AuthorsToke T. Høye25
Estimated H-index: 25
(AU: Aarhus University)
At the close of the Fourth International Polar Year, we take stock of the ecological consequences of recent climate change in the Arctic, focusing on effects at population, community, and ecosystem scales. Despite the buffering effect of landscape heterogeneity, Arctic ecosystems and the trophic relationships that structure them have been severely perturbed. These rapid changes may be a bellwether of changes to come at lower latitudes and have the potential to affect ecosystem services related t...
Published on Sep 1, 2008in Journal of Animal Ecology 4.36
Morten Frederiksen32
Estimated H-index: 32
,
Francis Daunt37
Estimated H-index: 37
+ 1 AuthorsSarah Wanless59
Estimated H-index: 59
1. Most scenarios for future climate change predict increased variability and thus increased frequency of extreme weather events. To predict impacts of climate change on wild populations, we need to understand whether this translates into increased variability in demographic parameters, which would lead to reduced population growth rates even without a change in mean parameter values. This requires robust estimates of temporal process variance in e.g. survival, and identification of weather cova...
Published on Sep 1, 2008in Journal of Field Ornithology 1.85
Kyle H. Elliott24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Gail K. Davoren23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Anthony J. Gaston15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Carleton University)
Although many studies involve observations of parent birds feeding their young, few investigators have attempted to quantify possible sources of bias associated with such observations. To address this issue, we observed the provisioning behavior of Thick-billed Murres (Uria lomvia) at a breeding colony on Coats Island, Nunavut, Canada from 2004 to 2007. We also attached electronic recorders that indicated every return to the colony and, for some prey items, allowed us to determine whether they w...
Published on Aug 1, 2008in Biological Reviews 10.29
Vladimir Grosbois20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UCBL: Claude Bernard University Lyon 1),
Olivier Gimenez39
Estimated H-index: 39
(St And: University of St Andrews)
+ 5 AuthorsHenri Weimerskirch41
Estimated H-index: 41
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
The impact of the ongoing rapid climate change on natural systems is a major issue for human societies. An important challenge for ecologists is to identify the climatic factors that drive temporal variation in demographic parameters, and, ultimately, the dynamics of natural populations. The analysis of long-term monitoring data at the individual scale is often the only available approach to estimate reliably demographic parameters of vertebrate populations. We review statistical procedures used...
Cited By24
Newest
Published in Polar Research 1.15
Morten Frederiksen32
Estimated H-index: 32
(AU: Aarhus University),
Jannie Fries Linnebjerg6
Estimated H-index: 6
(AU: Aarhus University)
+ -3 AuthorsGregory J. Robertson28
Estimated H-index: 28
Brunnich’s guillemot (Uria lomvia), or thick-billed murre, is an abundant pan-Arctic seabird, but several Atlantic breeding populations are declining. The species is subject to traditional harvest in the important wintering areas off west Greenland and Newfoundland, and has been subject to chronic oil pollution on the east coast of Canada. Until recently, knowledge of winter distribution has been insufficient to assess the impact of these mortality sources on specific breeding populations. We co...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Ecology and Evolution 2.42
Anna Tigano4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Queen's University),
Allison J. Shultz9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Harvard University)
+ 2 AuthorsVicki L. Friesen31
Estimated H-index: 31
(Queen's University)
Investigating the extent (or the existence) of local adaptation is crucial to understanding how populations adapt. When experiments or fitness measurements are difficult or impossible to perform in natural populations, genomic techniques allow us to investigate local adaptation through the comparison of allele frequencies and outlier loci along environmental clines. The thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia) is a highly philopatric colonial arctic seabird that occupies a significant environmental grad...
Published on Dec 30, 2016
Nina J. Karnovsky22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Pomona College),
Maria V. Gavrilo9
Estimated H-index: 9
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Biological Conservation 4.45
Morten Frederiksen32
Estimated H-index: 32
(AU: Aarhus University),
Sébastien Descamps17
Estimated H-index: 17
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
+ 16 AuthorsMark L. Mallory18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Acadia University)
Pelagic seabirds are exposed to an array of potential threats during the non-breeding period, and effective management of these threats on a large scale requires knowledge of which populations winter where. Thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) are emblematic of this conservation challenge, since they breed widely in the circumpolar Arctic, with many declining populations in the Atlantic. Threats facing murres include hunting, oil spills, bycatch and oceanic change influencing prey availability. Pre...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Avian Conservation and Ecology 2.14
Jean-François Giroux16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Martin Patenaude-Monette4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 2 AuthorsFrançois Racine1
Estimated H-index: 1
Understanding how birds cope with climate change has received much attention in recent years. So far, more emphasis has been given to passerine species than to any other groups of birds, possibly because of the availability of long-term data sets. Our objective was to study the effect of climate change on spring arrival date and breeding chronology of Ring-billed Gulls (Larus delawarensis), a short-distance migrant with a diverse diet. Based on Etude des Populations d'Oiseaux du Quebec (EPOQ) ch...
Published on Sep 1, 2015in Ecological Applications 4.38
Beth E. Ross5
Estimated H-index: 5
(USU: Utah State University),
Mevin B. Hooten27
Estimated H-index: 27
(CSU: Colorado State University)
+ 1 AuthorsDavid N. Koons22
Estimated H-index: 22
(USU: Utah State University)
An understanding of species relationships is critical in the management and conservation of populations facing climate change, yet few studies address how climate alters species interactions and other population drivers. We use a long-term, broad-scale data set of relative abundance to examine the influence of climate, predators, and density dependence on the population dynamics of declining scaup ( Aythya ) species within the core of their breeding range. The state-space modeling approach we us...
Published on Aug 1, 2015in Progress in Oceanography 3.25
George J. Divoky12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Paul M. Lukacs18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UM: University of Montana),
Matthew L. Druckenmiller3
Estimated H-index: 3
Recent major reductions in summer arctic sea ice extent could be expected to be affecting the distributions and life histories of arctic marine biota adapted to living adjacent to sea ice. Of major concern are the effects of ice reductions, and associated increasing SST, on the most abundant forage fish in the Arctic, Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), the primary prey for the region’s upper trophic level marine predators. The black guillemot (Cepphus grylle mandtii) is an ice-obligate diving seabir...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Ecology and Evolution 2.42
Sebastian Descamps1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute),
Arnaud Tarroux11
Estimated H-index: 11
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
+ 3 AuthorsSvein-Håkon Lorentsen15
Estimated H-index: 15
Weather extremes are one important element of ongoing climate change, but their impacts are poorly understood because they are, by definition, rare events. If the frequency and severity of extreme weather events increase, there is an urgent need to understand and predict the ecological consequences of such events. In this study, we aimed to quantify the effects of snow storms on nest survival in Antarctic petrels and assess whether snow storms are an important driver of annual breeding success a...
Published on Dec 8, 2014in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution
Daniel Oro41
Estimated H-index: 41
As a physical driver of ecosystem functioning, it is not surprising that climate influences seabird demography and population dynamics, generally by affecting food availability. However, if we zoom in ecologically, seabirds are in fact very heterogeneous, ranging in size from very small to very large species (with a difference of more than two orders of magnitude in body weight), from planktivorous forms to predators of large fish and squid, from benthic to pelagic, from species with small forag...