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Racial Prejudice and Attitudes Toward Affirmative Action

Published on Apr 1, 1997in American Journal of Political Science4.35
· DOI :10.2307/2111770
James H. Kuklinski32
Estimated H-index: 32
,
Paul M. Sniderman37
Estimated H-index: 37
+ 4 AuthorsBarbara A. Mellers39
Estimated H-index: 39
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Abstract
Theory: We examine the relationship between blatant racial prejudice and anger toward affirmative action. Hypotheses: (1) Blatantly prejudiced attitudes continue to pervade the white population in the United States. (2) Resistance to affirmative action is more than an extension of this prejudice. (3) White resistance to affirmative action is not unyielding and unalterably fixed. Methods: Analysis of experiments embedded in a national survey of racial attitudes. Some of these experiments are designed to measure racial prejudice unobtrusively. Results: Racial prejudice remains a major problem in the United States, but this prejudice alone cannot explain all of the anger toward affirmative action among whites. Although many whites strongly resist affirmative action, they express support for making extra efforts to help African-Americans.
  • References (22)
  • Citations (148)
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References22
Newest
Published on May 1, 1997in The Journal of Politics2.49
James H. Kuklinski32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Michael D. Cobb12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Martin Gilens17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Yale University)
An abundance of survey research conducted over the past two decades has portrayed a "new South" in which the region's white residents now resemble the remainder of the country in their racial attitudes No longer is the South the bastion of racial prejudice. Using a new and relatively unobtrusive measure of racial attitudes designed to overcome possible social desirability effects, our study finds racial prejudice to be still high in the South and markedly higher in the South than the non-South. ...
Published on Sep 29, 1995
E George Marcus....1
Estimated H-index: 1
Preface: Political tolerance and democratic life Part I. Theoretical Background and Overview: 1. Political tolerance and democratic practice 2. Antecedent considerations and contemporary information 3. Thinking and mood Part II. Contemporary Information and Political Tolerance Judgments: 4. Tolerance judgments and contemporary information - the basic studies Appendix 4A. The basic experiments - manipulation checks Part III. Refining the Model - The Role of Antecedent Conserations as Individual D...
Published on Jan 1, 1994in Journal of Policy Analysis and Management3.83
Robert L. Boyd15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Robert B. Hill3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 9 AuthorsTimothy C. Bates1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Jan 1, 1993
Diane M. Mackie43
Estimated H-index: 43
,
David L. Hamilton37
Estimated H-index: 37
Cognitive and Affective Processes in Intergroup Perception: The Developing Interface. Emotions, Arousal, and Stereotypic Judgments: A Heuristic Model of Affect and Stereotyping. The Influence of Affect on Stereotyping: The Case of Illusory Correlations. Affect and Perceived Group Variability: Implications for Stereotyping and Prejudice. The Role of Anxiety in Facilitating Stereotypic Judgments of Out-Group Behavior. Cognition and Affect in Stereotyping: Parallel Interactive Networks. Values, Ste...
Published on Aug 17, 1992
James M. Fendrich1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Thomas Byrne Edsall2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Mary D. Edsall2
Estimated H-index: 2
Traces the rise of the American Republican party to its current, almost unassailable position in presidential elections. The authors argue that the main voting issues in the USA since the mid-1960s have been underpinned by racial anxiety and resentment of welfare liberalities.
Published on Jan 1, 1991
Thomas Byrne Edsall2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Mary D. Edsall2
Estimated H-index: 2
Published on Jan 1, 1989in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology5.92
Patricia G. Devine39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)
University of Wisconsin--Madis on Three studies tested basic assumptions derived from a theoretical model based on the dissociation ofantomatic and controlled processes involved in prejudice. Study I supported the model's assumption that high- and low-prejudice persons are equally knowledgeable of the cultural stereotype. The model suggests that the stereotype is automatically activated in the presence of a member (or some symbolic equivalent) of the stereotyped group and that Iow-prejudiee resp...
Published on May 1, 1988in Journal of Experimental Social Psychology3.29
Jon A. Krosnick68
Estimated H-index: 68
(OSU: Ohio State University)
Abstract This study tests the hypothesis that attitudes people consider to be personally important are more stable over relatively long periods than are attitudes people consider unimportant. Latent variable structural equation models are applied to political attitude data collected during the 1980 and 1984 American presidential election campaigns. These analyses support the claim that important attitudes change less over time than unimportant attitudes. The lower over-time consistency of report...
Published on Jan 1, 1988in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology5.92
Jon A. Krosnick68
Estimated H-index: 68
(OSU: Ohio State University)
According to a number of social psychological theories, attitudes toward government policies that people consider important should have substantial impact on presidential candidate preferences, and unimportant attitudes should have relatively little impact. Surprisingly, the accumulated evidence evaluating this hypothesis offers little support for it. This article reexamines the hypothesis, applying more appropriate analysis methods to data collected during the 1968, 1980, and 1984 American pres...
Published on Jan 1, 1988
Ira Glasser1
Estimated H-index: 1
(American Civil Liberties Union)
Over 40 years ago, Gunnar Myrdal, in his seminal book An American Dilemma, dissected the moral problem of American racism as it had never been dissected before. His key insight is by now a cliche: that a terrible tension existed in American society between its professed ideals of equality and fairness based on individual merit and the reality of brutal, suffocating oppression based on skin color. This tension was said to create a dissonance in the American psyche so sharp that it threatened to s...
Cited By148
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2019in American Politics Research1.14
Marisa Abrajano11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego),
R. Michael Alvarez37
Estimated H-index: 37
(California Institute of Technology)
Given the fundamental role that race and ethnicity play in U.S. society, sensitive survey items on this subject can often lead individuals to underreport their true attitudes. Previous studies have shown that the absence of an interviewer reduces the pressure to provide socially desirable responses. The 2012 and 2016 American National Election Studies (ANES), where both interviewer and self-administered surveys were used, allows us to test whether mode effects emerge in the way respondents answe...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in American Politics Research1.14
Maruice Mangum (A&M: Texas A&M University), LaTasha DeHaan (CofC: College of Charleston)
This article seeks to explain why some White Americans support affirmative action while others do not. Much of what has been written on White opinions on affirmative action is from an oppositional lens. This analysis seeks to add balance to the ways political science understands White opinions toward affirmative action. In so doing, this study identifies correlates of support for affirmative action not just rationales for opposition. Unlike most studies that examine White opinions by testing one...
Published on Feb 20, 2019in Political Behavior2.53
R. Urbatsch1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Iowa State University)
Identifying the sincerity of shifts in public opinion is difficult: survey settings involve social pressure to provide seemingly popular answers. Names for newborn children in the United States provide an alternative, behavioral measure that can indicate the presence of social-desirability bias. First names typically exceed middle names in visibility and hence sensitivity to social-desirability effects. First names should therefore be more likely to change when name-givers wish to conform to wid...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in International Migration0.88
Mathew J. Creighton9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UCD: University College Dublin),
Peter E. Sifneos63
Estimated H-index: 63
(University of Giessen),
Diana Zavala-Rojas2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UPF: Pompeu Fabra University)
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Social Science Research1.76
Andrew J. Taylor7
Estimated H-index: 7
(NCSU: North Carolina State University),
Toby L. Parcel26
Estimated H-index: 26
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
Abstract We use a survey of residents of Wake County, North Carolina to test a proximity explanation for what scholars call the “principle-policy gap” in whites' views of government action on race. The derived hypothesis is confirmed when underlying broad views of race are represented by ideology. We show that whereas liberals are materially more supportive of racial diversity in student bodies than are moderates and conservatives, this difference is reduced to statistical insignificance as resp...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Electoral Studies1.82
Roni Lehrer2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UMA: University of Mannheim),
Sebastian Juhl1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UMA: University of Mannheim),
Thomas Gschwend17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UMA: University of Mannheim)
Abstract Survey research on sensitive questions is challenging because respondents often answer untruthfully or completely refuse to answer. Existing indirect questioning techniques address the problem of social desirability bias at the expense of decreasing estimates' efficiency. We suggest the Wisdom of Crowds survey design that does not pose a tradeoff between anonymity and efficiency as an alternative. We outline the conditions necessary for the technique to work and test them empirically. M...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in International Political Science Review1.77
S. Erdem Aytaç5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Koç University),
Ali Çarkoğlu17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Koç University)
Threat perceptions and prejudice underlie a large number of intergroup conflicts. In this article we explore prejudicial attitudes in Turkey regarding ethnic Kurdish and devout Muslim religious identities as opposed to Turkish and less observant, secular identities. Utilizing a population-based survey experiment, we use vignettes about a hypothetical family as a neighbour, with randomized ethnicity and religiosity-related cues. We find evidence for prejudice against Kurdish ethnicity, especially...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Economica1.50
Leopoldo Fergusson7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Carlos A. Molina8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Juan Felipe Riaño1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Jan 1, 2019
Stefanie Gosen1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Peter E. Sifneos63
Estimated H-index: 63
+ 1 AuthorsJürgen Leibold
This paper sheds new light on the unobtrusive measure known as the list experiment or unmatched count technique. Proponents of this method claim that it detects social desirability bias in responses to sensitive questions in surveys. The logic of this method is quite straightforward. After a critical overview of the theory, logic, and empirical results of this type of measure, we present the results of a series of three studies. While the first study yielded promising results, the replication of...
Published on Sep 28, 2018
Anna V. Andreenkova , Debra Javeline8
Estimated H-index: 8
(ND: University of Notre Dame)
View next paperRacial Attitudes and the "New South"