Match!

Seabird diet indicates changing Arctic marine communities in eastern Canada

Published on May 21, 2012in Marine Ecology Progress Series2.36
· DOI :10.3354/meps09299
Jennifer F. Provencher14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UVic: University of Victoria),
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
+ 1 AuthorsH.G. Gilchrist7
Estimated H-index: 7
Cite
Abstract
Seabird diet indicates changing Arctic marine communities in eastern Canada J. F. Provencher*, A. J. Gaston, P. D. O’Hara, H. G. Gilchrist Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3N5, Canada Science and Technology Branch, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3, Canada Canadian Wildlife Service, Sidney, British Columbia V8L 4B2, Canada
  • References (24)
  • Citations (49)
Cite
References24
Newest
Published on Oct 1, 2013in Biological oceanography
D. K. Cairns6
Estimated H-index: 6
(MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)
AbstractAn integrated approach to the use of seabirds as indicators of marine food supplies is developed, based on proposed relations between food availability and seabird population and behavior parameters. Adult survivorship, breeding success, chick growth, colony attendance, and activity budgets vary with prey availability, but response to food supply occurs at different temporal scales and at different levels of prey availability for each parameter. Seabird data most reliably indicate food a...
Published on Jun 16, 2010in Arctic1.43
Julian B.T. Scott1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Gareth J. Marshall44
Estimated H-index: 44
Over the last four decades there has been a trend to earlier summer breakup of the sea ice in western Hudson Bay, Canada. As this sea ice is critical for the polar bears that use it for hunting, the earlier breakup is believed to be a factor in the declining health of the regional polar bear population. Analysis of the change to earlier breakup using passive microwave satellite data is problematic because of currently unquantifiable systematic errors between different satellites. Analysis using ...
Published on Jan 18, 2010in Global Change Biology8.88
Janne E. Søreide21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UNIS: University Centre in Svalbard),
Eva Leu19
Estimated H-index: 19
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
+ 2 AuthorsStig Falk-Petersen49
Estimated H-index: 49
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
The Arctic bloom consists of two distinct categories of primary producers, ice algae growing within and on the underside of the sea ice, and phytoplankton growing in open waters. Long chain omega-3 fatty acids, a subgroup of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) produced exclusively by these algae, are essential to all marine organisms for successful reproduction, growth, and development. During an extensive field study in the Arctic shelf seas, we followed the seasonal biomass development of ice ...
Published on Dec 1, 2009in Environmental Reviews3.96
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
,
Douglas F. Bertram20
Estimated H-index: 20
+ 10 AuthorsMoira J. F. Lemon5
Estimated H-index: 5
Systematic monitoring of seabird populations in Canada has been ongoing since the 1920s and the monitoring of diets and other biological indicators of ecosystem change started in the 1970s. Long-term monitoring of population parameters began in the 1980s. These studies originally were conducted mainly by the Canadian Wildlife Service, but subsequently have involved several universities and nongovernment organization groups. We review the results of this monitoring from the 1970s onwards for six ...
Published on Dec 1, 2009in Waterbirds0.65
Kyle H. Elliott24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Kerry J. Woo1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Carleton University),
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Carleton University)
Abstract. Prey items fed to chicks of eight individually-marked and known specialist Thick-billed Murres (Una lomvia) were watched over a 15–year period at Coats Island, Nunavut, and time-depth recorders attached to eight birds in two separate years. Two males were amphipod specialists, one male a cod specialist and another male a shanny specialist; two females were sculpin specialists and two capelin specialists. Although there was likely some gender-related component to diet, there were clear ...
Published on Sep 1, 2009in Fish and Fisheries6.66
William W. L. Cheung40
Estimated H-index: 40
(UBC: University of British Columbia),
Vicky W. Y. Lam19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
+ 3 AuthorsDaniel Pauly89
Estimated H-index: 89
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
Climate change can impact the pattern of marine biodiversity through changes in species’ distributions. However, global studies on climate change impacts on ocean biodiversity have not been performed so far. Our paper aims to investigate the global patterns of such impacts by projecting the distributional ranges of a sample of 1066 exploited marine fish and invertebrates for 2050 using a newly developed dynamic bioclimate envelope model. Our projections show that climate change may lead to numer...
Published on Aug 28, 2009in Arctic1.43
David G. Barber19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Jennifer V. Lukovich12
Estimated H-index: 12
+ 3 AuthorsG.H.R. Henry1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Arctic Institute of North America)
The first and strongest signs of global-scale climate change exist in the high latitudes of the planet. Evidence is now accumulating that the Arctic is warming, and responses are being observed across physical, biological, and social systems. The impact of climate change on oceanographic, sea-ice, and atmospheric processes is demonstrated in observational studies that highlight changes in temperature and salinity, which influence global oceanic circulation, also known as thermohaline circulation...
Published on Oct 1, 2008in The Auk2.66
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Carleton University),
Kerry Woo1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Carleton University)
Abstract We describe the occurrence and behavior of Razorbills (Alca torda) visiting Coats Island, Northern Hudson Bay, an area where sea-ice cover in summer has been much reduced since the mid-1990s. Coats Island is 300 km from the previous most-westerly breeding site for the species and nearly 2,000 km from the nearest large colony, in Newfoundland and Labrador. Razorbills appeared at Coats Island coincidentally with an increase in the delivery of Capelin (Mallotus villosus) and sand lance (Am...
Published on Jul 9, 2007in Polar Biology2.00
Asta Audzijonyte15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UH: University of Helsinki),
Risto VINOlLA27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UH: University of Helsinki)
Mysis nordenskioldi n. sp. is a circumpolar, arctic-subarctic coastal mysid crustacean, earlier considered conspecific with M. litoralis (Banner, 1948) and in the past also confused with the circumpolar M. oculata (Fabricius, 1780). Mysis litoralis itself seems to be restricted to the northeastern North Pacific. Formal diagnoses and descriptions of the three species are here given based on morphological and molecular characters (allozymes, mtDNA). The species are morphologically distinguished by...
Cited By49
Newest
Published in Science of The Total Environment5.59
Karen L. Foster9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Trent University),
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Carleton University)
+ -3 AuthorsMark L. Mallory18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Acadia University)
Abstract The historic influence of interannual weather and climate variability on total mercury concentrations (THg) in the eggs of two species of Arctic seabird in the Canadian High Arctic was investigated. Time series of THg in the eggs of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) and thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) from Prince Leopold Island span 40 years (1975–2014), making these among the longest time series available for contaminants in Arctic wildlife and uniquely suitable for evaluation of...
Published on May 30, 2019in Ecology and Evolution2.42
Isabeau Pratte2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Acadia University),
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Carleton University)
+ 1 AuthorsMark L. Mallory18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Acadia University)
Published on Apr 17, 2019in PLOS ONE2.78
Melanie A. Smith2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Benjamin K. Sullender + 3 AuthorsAaron J. Poe1
Estimated H-index: 1
(FWS: United States Fish and Wildlife Service)
Recently available downscaled ocean climate models for the Bering Sea and Aleutian Arc offer the opportunity to assess climate vulnerability for upper trophic level consumers such as marine birds. We analyzed seasonal and annual spatial projections from three climate models for two physical climate variables (seawater temperature and sea ice) and three forage variables (large copepods, euphausiids, and benthic infauna), comparing projected conditions from a recent time period (2003–2012) to a fu...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Polar Biology2.00
J. Tourangeau (Carleton University), Jennifer F. Provencher5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Acadia University)
+ 2 AuthorsMark R. Forbes32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Carleton University)
Documenting how climate change will affect Arctic ecosystems and food web dynamics requires an understanding of current sources of variation in species distributions, frequency, and abundance. Host–parasite interactions are expected to be altered in the coming decades under warming conditions. However, in many Polar Regions, there is little information describing parasite–host assemblages. We examine how gastrointestinal helminths of northern common eider ducks (Somateria mollissima sedentaria) ...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Chemosphere5.11
Sara Pedro4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UConn: University of Connecticut),
Aaron T. Fisk47
Estimated H-index: 47
(U of W: University of Windsor)
+ 3 AuthorsMelissa A. McKinney19
Estimated H-index: 19
(McGill University)
Abstract We determined concentrations of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (EPA + DHA), Σ omega -3, polyunsaturated fatty acids (ΣPUFA), selenium, methylmercury, and selenium:methylmercury (Se:Hg) ratios in native and northward-redistributing sub-Arctic marine fish and invertebrates from low, mid-, and high Canadian Arctic latitudes. There was no clear latitudinal trend in nutrient or contaminant concentrations. Among species, EPA + DHA concentrations in native Arctic cod ( Boreogadus s...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Science of The Total Environment5.59
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Carleton University),
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Carleton University),
Mark L. Mallory3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Acadia University)
Abstract We compared temporal trends of legacy organochlorine pesticides and PCBs in eggs of five seabird species breeding at Prince Leopold Island in the Canadian high Arctic. Concentrations of most of the major organochlorine groups/compounds have either declined (e.g. Σ 35 PCB, ΣDDT, ΣCBz, ΣCHL, octachlorostyrene) or shown no consistent directional change (e.g. heptachlor epoxide) since 1975 in eggs of thick-billed murres ( Uria lomvia ), northern fulmars ( Fulmarus glacialis ) and black-legg...
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Polar Biology2.00
Krista A. Kenyon (UM: University of Manitoba), David J. Yurkowski10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UM: University of Manitoba)
+ 2 AuthorsSteven H. Ferguson32
Estimated H-index: 32
Arctic pack ice structure and extent have been changing due to warming. Thus, understanding important habitat features for marine mammals that depend on sea ice, such as narwhal (Monodon monoceros), during winter will provide insight into impacts of future changes within the pack ice. The objective of this study was to determine narwhal habitat selection for bathymetry, sea ice concentration, thickness, and floe size during the winter season. Nineteen narwhals were equipped with SPLASH tags in A...
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Royal Society Open Science2.52
David J. Yurkowski10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Nigel E. Hussey23
Estimated H-index: 23
(U of W: University of Windsor)
+ 1 AuthorsAaron T. Fisk47
Estimated H-index: 47
(U of W: University of Windsor)
Climate change is leading to northward shifts in species distributions that is altering interspecific interactions at low- and mid-trophic levels. However, little attention has been focused on the effects of redistributions of species on the trophic ecology of a high trophic-level predator assemblage. Here, during a 22-year period (1990–2012) of increasing sea temperature (1.0°C) and decreasing sea ice extent (12%) in Cumberland Sound, Nunavut, Canada, we examined the trophic structure of a near...
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Polar Biology2.00
Jennifer L. Horwath Burnham3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Augustana College (Illinois)),
Kurt K. Burnham7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 2 AuthorsJeff A. Johnson19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UNT: University of North Texas)
Birds are useful bioindicators of environmental contamination around the globe, but avian studies in the high Arctic have been primarily limited to a few abundant species. This study was designed to assess mercury (Hg) concentrations in both abundant and less-abundant marine and terrestrial avian species on breeding grounds in northwest Greenland using blood sampling. Twenty-four migratory avian species (n = 625) were sampled over a three-year period (2010–2012) along 750 km of coastline near Th...
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Polar Biology2.00
Marianne Falardeau2
Estimated H-index: 2
(McGill University),
Caroline Bouchard12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Laval University)
+ 1 AuthorsLouis Fortier39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Laval University)
An increasing number of boreal marine species are expected to invade the warming Arctic Ocean with the potential to displace endemic species. We provide first evidence that Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus) is expanding its range in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, a region far outside the species temperate-boreal traditional range south of the Bering Strait. To the best of our knowledge, supported by local Inuit knowledge, the species was not present in the area until the present decade...