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Making disciplinary writing and thinking practices an integral part of academic content teaching

Published on Nov 1, 2013in Active Learning in Higher Education2.29
· DOI :10.1177/1469787413498037
Kerry Hunter2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney),
Harry Tse3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)
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Abstract
Educators and researchers are increasingly calling for the processes of writing and knowledge construction to be an integral part of disciplinary learning. This article contributes to the literature by presenting an empirical analysis of a programme that was designed to expose students to the complexities of academic practices in conjunction with disciplinary concepts. The impact of the programme was evaluated through analysis of student grades before and after its implementation and student and tutor perception of its effect. Data collected included surveys, interviews and focus groups. The data showed that the programme generated student engagement with the processes of knowledge construction and reflected better thinking in the subject. This was evidenced by effective utilisation of feedback and improved grades in written assignments. The findings suggest that similar programmes are of value potentially to any discipline.
  • References (20)
  • Citations (12)
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References20
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2012in Studies in Higher Education2.85
Ursula Wingate11
Estimated H-index: 11
('KCL': King's College London),
Christopher Tribble9
Estimated H-index: 9
('KCL': King's College London)
This article is a review of two dominant approaches to academic writing instruction in higher education, English for Academic Purposes (EAP), which is used internationally, and Academic Literacies, which has become an influential model in the UK. The review was driven by a concern that Academic Literacies has been mainly focused on the situations of ‘non-traditional’ students, and has not sufficiently acknowledged the theoretical and pedagogical potential of EAP for developing a mainstream instr...
Published on Mar 1, 2011in Active Learning in Higher Education2.29
Ursula Wingate11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Nicholas Andon5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Alessia Cogo9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Surrey)
The benefits of embedding the teaching of writing into the curriculum have been advocated by educators and researchers. However, there is currently little evidence of embedded writing instruction in the UK’s higher education context. In this article, we present a case study in which we report the design, implementation and evaluation of an academic writing intervention with first-year undergraduate students in an applied linguistics programme. Our objectives were to try a combination of embedded...
Published on Jan 1, 2011in Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education2.47
Kerry Hunter2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney),
Peter Docherty5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)
This paper extends the literature on grader variation and the role of moderation and socialisation processes in reducing this variation. It offers a fresh categorisation of academics’ assessment beliefs and expectations, and uses this categorisation to analyse the interaction between implicit and explicit expectations in relation to grader variation and socialisation processes. A combination of quantitative and qualitative data from a large class grading moderation process was used to identify t...
Published on Mar 1, 2008in Higher Education Research & Development1.82
Dai Hounsell19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh),
Velda McCune16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
+ 1 AuthorsJudith Litjens2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
The paper presents research findings on students’ experiences of the provision both of guidance and feedback, and with respect to examinations as well as coursework assignments. A first‐ and a final‐year bioscience course unit were surveyed in each of three contrasting university departments. The resulting dataset comprised 782 completed student questionnaires and 23 group interviews with a total of 69 students. Although the questionnaire data provided a robust overall picture of the students’ p...
Published on Dec 1, 2007in Curriculum Journal
Charles Anderson11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh),
Dai Hounsell19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
This article addresses the themes of this special issue by examining the disciplinary dimensions of learning and teaching within undergraduate courses in the areas of biology and history. Key ways of thinking and practising that biology and history lecturers wished to foster in their students are identified. It presents a relational view of the role of these disciplinary ways of thinking and practising in undergraduate learning, and considers how domain knowledge exists in dynamic relationship w...
Published on Oct 1, 2006in Teaching in Higher Education1.72
Ursula Wingate11
Estimated H-index: 11
('KCL': King's College London)
This paper argues that the widespread approach to enhancing student learning through separate study skills courses is ineffective, and that the term ‘study skills’ itself has misleading implications, which are counterproductive to learning. The main argument is that learning how to study effectively at university cannot be separated from subject content and the process of learning. The role of ‘study skills’ within universities’ skills frameworks, and as a component of students’ long-term develo...
Published on Oct 1, 2006in Studies in Higher Education2.85
Tamsin Haggis8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Stirling)
Growing concerns about retention and attrition rates in a mass and increasingly marketised higher education system have encouraged the idea that ‘meeting learner needs’ should be a key focus for institutional attention. It is suggested that this approach is unrealistic, however, because of the extent of the diversity which it attempts to respond to. An alternative response is to move away from the individualised focus on needs, deficits and ‘support’, towards a consideration of ‘activities, patt...
Published on Apr 1, 2006in Studies in Higher Education2.85
David Carless27
Estimated H-index: 27
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
Feedback is central to the development of effective learning, yet is comparatively underresearched. This article seeks to examine the notion of written feedback on assignments and argue that this feedback process is more complex than is sometimes acknowledged. The author illustrates the problematic nature of assignment feedback by drawing on a large‐scale questionnaire survey conducted across eight universities, and then analysing the issue in more depth though fine‐grained data collected from s...
Cited By12
Newest
Rosemary Wette7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Auckland)
Abstract This study reports on provision to assist students in the health sciences develop knowledge and skill in locating, evaluating, and synthesising sources to use as supporting evidence for the argument essays they are required to produce for first year courses at a university in New Zealand. Students were provided with support in the form of documents, tutorials, online discussion and structured assignment tasks, as well as through embedded instruction offered collaboratively by subject le...
Published on Nov 14, 2018in Active Learning in Higher Education2.29
Marlies Schillings (UM: Maastricht University), Herma Roebertsen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UM: Maastricht University)
+ 1 AuthorsDiana Dolmans37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UM: Maastricht University)
Written feedback plays a key role in the acquisition of academic writing skills. Ideally, this feedback should include feed up, feed back and feed forward. However, written feedback alone is not enough to improve writing skills; students often struggle to interpret the feedback received and enhance their writing skills accordingly. Several studies have suggested that dialogue about written feedback is essential to promote the development of these skills. Yet, evidence of the effectiveness of fac...
Linda Mostert2
Estimated H-index: 2
(NMU: Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University),
Rodwell Townsend1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NMU: Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University)
AbstractThis paper lends support to the argument that students require a variety of teaching strategies to help them improve their academic writing. The study described here took place in 2014 in the context of embedding the teaching of academic writing into anthropology modules. The strategies implemented were microthemes, peer feedback, annotated bibliographies, and, for the sake of introducing blended learning, word clouds. The findings provide an overview of what aspects of each teaching str...
Published on Jan 1, 2018
While research on self-regulated learning and teaching is on the rise, writing is a task with which many high school students continue to struggle. It is encouraging that some teachers are cognizant of the importance of considering self-regulation and motivation levels of students as they design innovative and effective writing lesson plans. In this chapter, two exemplary writing lesson plans are presented, followed by teacher reflections, and an analysis of how each lesson plan addresses the co...
Published on Nov 17, 2017in Active Learning in Higher Education2.29
David Hodgson4
Estimated H-index: 4
The examination of a PhD thesis marks an important stage in the PhD student journey. Here, the student’s research, thinking and writing are assessed by experts in their field. Yet, in the early stages of candidature, students often do not know what is expected of their thesis, nor what examiners will scrutinise and comment on. However, what examiners look for, expect and comment on has been the subject of recent research. This article synthesises the literature on examiner expectations into a fr...
Published on May 27, 2017in Educational Action Research
Kari Mari Jonsmoen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(HiOA: Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences),
Marit Greek1
Estimated H-index: 1
(HiOA: Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences)
AbstractEmbedding academic literacy into the curriculum and regular subject teaching has received little attention in Norwegian higher education (HE). The present article, drawing on the findings of two studies carried out in 2013/14, seeks to amend this. The first study, an action research study, exposes how lecturers in one of the faculties at Oslo and Akershus University College perceive their role in teaching and guiding students’ discipline-specific literacy, in particular academic writing....
Zeina Daouk1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Lebanese American University),
Rima Bahous10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Lebanese American University),
Nahla Nola Bacha10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Lebanese American University)
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to determine students’ and instructors’ perceptions regarding the effectiveness of implementing active learning strategies in higher education courses conducted at a tertiary institution in Lebanon. Design/methodology/approach – Pre-service education students completed a questionnaire, professors were interviewed, and class sessions were observed. Findings – Main findings indicate that the majority of the learners as well as the instructors favoured active ...
Published on Feb 18, 2016in Journal of Music History Pedagogy
Stephen Meyer1
Estimated H-index: 1
Many graduate programs in music history equip students with the skills necessary to become star researchers, but neglect training them in discipline-specific pedagogy. Yet the expectation that graduate students will become good teachers by trial and error in the classroom, and that field-specific pedagogy is not as worthy of academic attention does students a disservice. This paper makes a case for including music history pedagogy scholarship and training in graduate level courses. It posits tha...
Published on Jan 1, 2016
Kerrin Riewerts (Bielefeld University)
In den Naturwissenschaften ist das Schreiben eine Tatigkeit, die selten eingehender beachtet und kaum explizit vermittelt wird; selten wird hier das Schreiben an sich (bzw. der Schreibprozess) diskutiert. Vordergrundig ist die Laborphase wesentlich, das Schreiben wird lediglich als ein Zusammentragen der Ergebnisse fur die Publikation angesehen.
John Hamilton4
Estimated H-index: 4
(VU: Victoria University, Australia)
Given the significant increase in non-traditional students and changing pathways into higher education (HE), the need to scaffold academic literacies development for commencing students has never been greater. Writing models are recognised as useful in this process, particularly in relation to academic essay writing. However, there are reservations and concerns with the use of writing models in teaching and learning in HE. These include that models can oversimplify the writing process, inhibit d...