Icons / Logo / Facebook Created with Sketch. Icons / Logo / Google Created with Sketch. Icons / Logo / ORCID Created with Sketch. Branding/Logomark minus Citation Combined Shape Icon/Bookmark-empty Icon/Copy Icon/Collection Icon/Close Copy 7 no author result Created with Sketch. Icon/Back Created with Sketch. Match!

Adding insult to injury: neural sensitivity to social exclusion is associated with internalizing symptoms in chronically peer-victimized girls.

Published on May 1, 2016in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 3.66
· DOI :10.1093/scan/nsw021
Karen D. Rudolph39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Michelle E. Miernicki5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
+ 2 AuthorsEva H. Telzer31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
Cite
Abstract
Despite evidence documenting activation of the social pain network in response to social rejection and its link to temporary distress, far less is known regarding its role in pervasive emotional difficulties. Moreover, research has not considered the intersection between neural activation to experimentally induced social exclusion and naturally occurring social adversity. This study examined an integrated social pain model of internalizing symptoms, which posits that: (a) neural sensitivity in the social pain network is associated with internalizing symptoms; (b) this linkage is more robust in youth with than without a history of social adversity; and (c) heightened avoidance motivation serves as one pathway linking neural sensitivity and internalizing symptoms. During a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan, 47 adolescent girls with well-characterized histories of peer victimization were exposed to social exclusion. Whole-brain analyses revealed that activation to exclusion in the social pain network was associated with internalizing symptoms. As anticipated, this linkage was stronger in chronically victimized than non-victimized girls and was partially accounted for by avoidance motivation. This research indicates the importance of integrating neural, social, and psychological systems of development in efforts to elucidate risk for internalizing symptoms among adolescent girls. Language: en
  • References (64)
  • Citations (18)
Cite
References64
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 3.41
Geert-Jan Will8
Estimated H-index: 8
(LEI: Leiden University),
Pol A. C. van Lier31
Estimated H-index: 31
(VU: VU University Amsterdam)
+ 1 AuthorsBerna Güroğlu21
Estimated H-index: 21
(LEI: Leiden University)
This functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study examined subjective and neural responses to social exclusion in adolescents (age 12–15) who either had a stable accepted (n = 27; 14 males) or a chronic rejected (n = 19; 12 males) status among peers from age 6 to 12. Both groups of adolescents reported similar increases in distress after being excluded in a virtual ball-tossing game (Cyberball), but adolescents with a history of chronic peer rejection showed higher activity in brain region...
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 3.41
Amanda E. Guyer32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Johanna M. Jarcho20
Estimated H-index: 20
(NIH: National Institutes of Health)
+ 4 AuthorsEric E. Nelson43
Estimated H-index: 43
(NIH: National Institutes of Health)
Behavioral inhibition (BI) is a temperament characterized by social reticence and withdrawal from unfamiliar or novel contexts and conveys risk for social anxiety disorder. Developmental outcomes associated with this temperament can be influenced by children’s caregiving context. The convergence of a child’s temperamental disposition and rearing environment is ultimately expressed at both the behavioral and neural levels in emotional and cognitive response patterns to social challenges. The pres...
Wendy Troop-Gordon23
Estimated H-index: 23
(NDSU: North Dakota State University),
Karen D. Rudolph39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
+ 1 AuthorsTodd D. Little67
Estimated H-index: 67
(TTU: Texas Tech University)
Although associations between peer victimization in childhood and later psychopathology are well documented, surprisingly little research directly examines pathways accounting for these enduring effects. The present study addresses this issue by examining whether maladaptive responses to peer aggression (less effortful engagement coping and more involuntary responses) mediate associations between peer victimization and later depressive symptoms. Data were collected on 636 children (338 girls, 29...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 3.66
Jean-Yves Rotge16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Cédric Lemogne22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Paris V: Paris Descartes University)
+ 5 AuthorsPhilippe Fossati38
Estimated H-index: 38
Many functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have explored the neural correlates of social pain that results from social threat, exclusion, rejection, loss or negative evaluation. Although activations have consistently been reported within the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), it remains unclear which ACC subdivision is particularly involved. To provide a quantitative estimation of the specific involvement of ACC subdivisions in social pain, we conducted a voxel-based meta-analysis. The lit...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 3.66
Naomi I. Eisenberger53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)
Since at least the 1930s, when the American physician James Papez highlighted the importance of the cingulate gyrus for emotional processes (Papez, 1937), researchers have been interested in the functions of this region. One issue that has been challenging to disentangle, though, is how specific psychological processes map onto the various subdivisions of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Whereas early lesion studies focused on the role of the dorsal ACC (dACC) in pain experience (Foltz and W...
Published on Dec 1, 2014in Nature Communications 11.88
Choong-Wan Woo12
Estimated H-index: 12
(CU: University of Colorado Boulder),
Leonie Koban13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CU: University of Colorado Boulder)
+ 5 AuthorsTor D. Wager67
Estimated H-index: 67
(CU: University of Colorado Boulder)
Physical pain and social rejection are believed to be processed by common neural substrates in the brain. Here Woo et al. combine brain imaging with pattern analysis to show that, in fact, pain and rejection are processed by distinct neural substrates that are located in similar anatomical brain regions.
Published on Nov 1, 2014in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 3.66
Jennifer S. Silk38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Pittsburgh),
Greg J. Siegle48
Estimated H-index: 48
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 3 AuthorsRonald E. Dahl5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Pittsburgh)
Sensitivity to social evaluation has been proposed as a potential marker or risk factor for depression, and has also been theorized to increase with pubertal maturation. This study utilized an ecologically valid paradigm to test the hypothesis that adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) would show altered reactivity to peer rejection and acceptance relative to healthy controls in a network of ventral brain regions implicated in affective processing of social information. A total of 48 ...
Published on Aug 1, 2014in Development and Psychopathology 3.59
Karen D. Rudolph39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Wendy Troop-Gordon23
Estimated H-index: 23
(NDSU: North Dakota State University)
+ 1 AuthorsMichelle E. Miernicki5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
Nicki Crick initiated a generative line of theory and research aimed at exploring the implications of exposure to overt and relational aggression for youth development. The present study aimed to continue and expand this research by examining whether early (second grade) and increasing (second-sixth grade) levels of victimization during elementary school contributed to youths' tendencies to move against, away from, or toward the world of peers following the transition to middle school. Youth (M ...
Published on May 1, 2014in Social Development 1.81
Karen D. Rudolph39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Lauren E. Bohn1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
This research examined how children's need for approval (NFA) from peers predicted social behavior (prosocial behavior, aggression, and social helplessness) and peer responses (acceptance, victimization, exclusion). Children (N = 526, mean age = 7.95, standard deviation = .33) reported on NFA and teachers reported on social engagement. Approach NFA (motivation to gain approval) predicted more positive engagement and less conflictual engagement and disengagement. Conversely, avoidance NFA (motiva...
Published on Apr 1, 2014in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience 4.92
Justin D. Caouette4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Amanda E. Guyer32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
Social anxiety disorder (SAD) markedly impairs daily functioning. For adolescents, SAD can constrain typical development precisely when social experiences broaden, peers’ opinions are highly salient, and social approval is actively sought. Individuals with extreme, impairing social anxiety fear evaluation from others, avoid social interactions, and interpret ambiguous social cues as threatening. Yet some degree of social anxiety can be normative and non-impairing. Furthermore, a temperament of b...
Cited By18
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience 4.92
J. Susanne Asscheman (VU: VU University Amsterdam), Susanne Koot (VU: VU University Amsterdam)+ 4 AuthorsPol A. C. van Lier31
Estimated H-index: 31
(VU: VU University Amsterdam)
Abstract Peer preference among classmates is a highly influential factor in children’s social development and not being preferred by peers has long-term consequences for children’s developmental outcomes. However, little is known about how a history of low peer preference during primary school is associated with neural responses to a new social exclusion experience in childhood. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we examined self-reported social distress and neural respo...
Published on Apr 26, 2019in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 3.41
Johanna M. Jarcho20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
Johanna Jarcho (TU: Temple University)+ 6 AuthorsEric E. Nelson43
Estimated H-index: 43
Wariness in early childhood manifests as shy, inhibited behavior in novel social situations and is associated with increased risk for developing social anxiety. In youth with childhood wariness, exposure to a potent social stressor, such as peer victimization, may potentiate brain-based sensitivity to unpredictable social contexts, thereby increasing risk for developing social anxiety. To test brain-based associations between early childhood wariness, self-reported peer victimization, and curren...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Brain Sciences
Maria Pontillo9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Maria Cristina Tata1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 6 AuthorsStefano Vicari43
Estimated H-index: 43
Background: In the literature, several studies have proposed that children and adolescents with social anxiety had experienced previously victimization from peers and siblings. The aim of this review was to contribute to the updating of recent findings about the relationship between peer victimization and onset of social anxiety in children and adolescents. Methods: A selective review of literature published between 2011 and 2018 on Social Anxiety Disorder in children and adolescents that experi...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Affective Disorders 4.08
Theresa A. McIver5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Queen's University),
Theresa A. McIver1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 5 AuthorsWendy M. Craig38
Estimated H-index: 38
Abstract Background Peer victimization is associated with increased risk for depression, as well as increased neural response to social exclusion in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the amygdala. Altered functional connectivity (FxC) of fronto-limbic circuitry is associated with risk for various affective disorders. The present study examined the relationship between fronto-limbic FxC during social exclusion, prior peer victimization experience and depressive symptoms. Methods Three mutua...
Published on May 31, 2019in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 2.62
Brent I. Rappaport (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis), Laura Hennefield1
Estimated H-index: 1
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
+ 5 AuthorsDeanna M75
Estimated H-index: 75
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
Peer victimization (or bullying) is a known risk factor for depression, especially among youth. However, the mechanisms connecting victimization experience to depression symptoms remains unknown. As depression is known to be associated with neural blunting to monetary rewards, aberrant responsiveness to social rewards may be a key deficit connecting socially stressful experiences with later depression. We therefore sought to determine whether adolescents’ experiences with social stress would be ...
Published on Apr 2, 2019in Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience 2.66
Wuyi Wang5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Yale University),
Simon Zhornitsky3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Yale University)
+ 4 AuthorsChiang-shan R. Li42
Estimated H-index: 42
(Yale University)
Social interaction involves self-initiated actions that engage subjective awareness of one's own volition. Individuals with social communication needs or social anxiety find it particularly difficult to initiate social interactions. However, extant studies have not specifically addressed how perceived exclusion may influence self-initiated actions during social interaction. As a first step to address this question, we scanned 24 healthy adults participating in a Cyberball game with two fictive p...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 3.41
Dara E. Babinski14
Estimated H-index: 14
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Autumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
+ 2 AuthorsDaniel N. Klein72
Estimated H-index: 72
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Many youth with ADHD experience peer difficulties, but the mechanisms underlying this dysfunction remain unknown. Very little work has examined neurophysiological measures of social feedback processing in relation to ADHD symptoms. The goal of this study was to examine associations of ADHD symptoms with indicators of sensitivity to social feedback in a laboratory task and self-report of rejection sensitivity. A large community sample of 10- to 15-year-old adolescents (N = 391; Mage = 12.64, 48.6...
Published on Jan 11, 2019in Frontiers in Psychology 2.13
M.R. du Plessis , Mieke R. du Plessis (LEI: Leiden University)+ 2 AuthorsBerna Güroǧlu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(LEI: Leiden University)
Background Childhood peer victimization is a stressful life experience associated with long-lasting adverse psychological consequences. While there is some evidence that victimization is associated with alterations in brain function, little is known about effects on brain structure. This study explored the relationships between childhood peer victimization, cortisol, and adolescent ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) structure in a sample of healthy children. Methods A total of 50 (Mage = 9....
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Schizophrenia Research 4.57
Teresa Vargas3
Estimated H-index: 3
(NU: Northwestern University),
Katherine S.F. Damme2
Estimated H-index: 2
(NU: Northwestern University),
Vijay Anand Mittal25
Estimated H-index: 25
Abstract Background Bullying has been shown to increase the risk of developing a psychotic disorder. To date, no studies have examined brain behavior relationships within the context of bullying victimization in clinical high-risk (CHR) youth, a group characterized by both gray and white matter abnormalities. The present study employed multimodal neuroimaging to examine possible neural mechanisms associated with bullying victimization. Methods CHR and healthy volunteers underwent clinical interv...