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PAPER PRESENTED AT INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON INCREASING WHEAT YIELD POTENTIAL, CIMMYT, OBREGON, MEXICO, 20–24 MARCH 2006 Reduced nitrogen and improved farm income for irrigated spring wheat in the Yaqui Valley, Mexico, using sensor based nitrogen management

Published on Jun 1, 2007in The Journal of Agricultural Science 1.33
· DOI :10.1017/S0021859607006995
J. I. Ortiz-Monasterio1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center),
W. R. Raun42
Estimated H-index: 42
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater)
Cite
Abstract
SUMMARY Wheat nitrogen-use efficiency in the Yaqui Valley has been estimated at about 0.31. The nitrogen that is not recovered by the crop has important environmental costs that have regional and global consequences. In addition, these nitrogen losses represent an important reduction in farm income. The objective of the present work was to validate a technology that includes the use of N-rich strips together with the GreenSeeker TM sensor and a crop algorithm in farmers’ fields with the ultimate goal of improving nitrogen-use efficiency through site-specific nitrogen management in irrigated spring wheat. During the wheat crop cycle 2002/03 and 2003/04, 13 validation experiments of c. 1 ha each were established in farmers’ fields in the Yaqui Valley. After the validation phase, during the wheat crop cycle 2005/06, eight technology transfer trials were established in farmers’ fields ; these had on an average an area of 10 ha each. Both the validation and technology transfer trials compared the farmers’ conventional nitrogen management use v. the use of the N-rich strip together with the Green Seeker TM sensor and a crop algorithm to derive N recommendations for each individual field. The results of the validation trials showed that on an average over all locations, farmers were able to save 69 kg N/ha, without any yield reduction. At the price of US0.9 per unit of N in the valley when these experiments were established, this represented savings to the farmers of US2/ha. The technology transfer trials demonstrated that, in large commercial areas with an average size of 10 ha, farmers could improve their farm income by US50/ha, when using sensor based N management. The combination of the N-rich strip, together with the use of the sensor and a crop algorithm to interpret the results from the sensor, allowed farmers to obtain significant savings in N use and thus in farm profits. Farm income was increased by US6/ha, when averaged over all trials in all years.
  • References (8)
  • Citations (56)
Cite
References8
Newest
Published on Aug 17, 2006in Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems 2.85
L. Christensen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CSU: Colorado State University),
William J. Riley40
Estimated H-index: 40
(LBNL: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory),
Ivan Ortiz-Monasterio23
Estimated H-index: 23
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center)
An improved version of an ecosystem nitrogen cycling model (NLOSS) is described, tested, and used to analyze nitrogen cycling in the Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico. In addition to previously described modules in NLOSS that simulate soil water and solute fluxes, soil evaporation, soil energy balance, and denitrification, modules were added to estimate crop growth, soil carbon cycling, urea hydrolysis, and nitrification. We first tested the model against season-long measurements of soil NO 3 − , NO ...
Published on Nov 1, 2005in Field Crops Research 3.87
David B. Lobell64
Estimated H-index: 64
(Stanford University),
J. Ivan Ortiz-Monasterio16
Estimated H-index: 16
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center)
+ 3 AuthorsWalter P. Falcon21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Stanford University)
Wheat yields in Mexico, which represent an important measure of breeding and management progress in developing world wheat production, have increased by 25% over the past two decades. Using a combination of mechanistic and statistical models, we show that much of this increase can be attributed to climatic trends in Northwest states, in particular cooling of growing season nighttime temperatures. This finding suggests that short-term prospects for yield progress are smaller than suggested by rec...
Published on Oct 1, 2005in Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis 0.69
W. R. Raun42
Estimated H-index: 42
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater),
John B. Solie27
Estimated H-index: 27
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater)
+ 6 AuthorsG. V. Johnson27
Estimated H-index: 27
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater)
Abstract Nitrogen (N) fertilization for cereal crop production does not follow any kind of generalized methodology that guarantees maximum nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). The objective of this work was to amalgamate some of the current concepts for N management in cereal production into an applied algorithm. This work at Oklahoma State University from 1992 to present has focused primarily on the use of optical sensors in red and near infrared bands for predicting yield, and using that information...
Published on Mar 1, 2005in Nature 43.07
J. Michael Beman17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Kevin R. Arrigo59
Estimated H-index: 59
,
Pamela A. Matson74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Stanford University)
Runoff of nutrients from agricultural regions and cities are a growing threat to the world's oceans, as highlighted in the Pew Oceans Commission report ( www.pewoceans.org ) and in the UN Environment Programme's Global Environment Outlook Year Book 2004, which identifies 150 oxygen-starved marine ‘dead zones’. A five-year study of the Gulf of California highlights just how vulnerable nitrogen-deficient areas of the oceans are to nitrogen pollution. Here, within days of fertilizer application to ...
Published on May 1, 2004in Field Crops Research 3.87
David B. Lobell64
Estimated H-index: 64
(Stanford University),
J. Ivan Ortiz-Monasterio16
Estimated H-index: 16
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center),
Gregory P. Asner97
Estimated H-index: 97
(Stanford University)
Increased efficiency of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use may be achieved with management practices that account for spatial variability in soil properties and temporal variability in climate. In this study, we develop a N management decision model for an irrigated wheat system that incorporates hypothetical diagnostics of soil N and growing season climate. The model is then used to quantify the potential value of these forecasts with respect to wheat yields, farmer profits, and excess N application. ...
Published on Nov 1, 2001in Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems 2.85
William J. Riley40
Estimated H-index: 40
(LBNL: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory),
Ivan Ortiz-Monasterio23
Estimated H-index: 23
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center),
Pamela A. Matson74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Stanford University)
Nitrate (NO−13) leaching from agricultural soils can represent a substantial loss of fertilizer nitrogen (N), but a large variation in losses has been reported. We report N leaching losses under four N fertilizer treatments and two farmer's fields in the Yaqui Valley, Mexico. In these irrigated wheat systems, farmers typically apply 250 kg N ha−1 as anhydrous ammonia (knifed in) or urea(broadcast), with 75% applied directly before planting and 25% at the time of the first post-planting irrigatio...
Published on Jan 1, 2001
Rosamond L. Naylor43
Estimated H-index: 43
,
Walter P. Falcon21
Estimated H-index: 21
,
Arturo Puente-Gonzalez1
Estimated H-index: 1
The overall effects of policy reforms enacted during the 1990s in Mexico on financial and economic profitability of Yaqui Valley agriculture are assessed in this study, which describes the reforms, examines how exogenous shocks affected the reform process, and documents how rural people and institutions adjusted to the changed circumstances. Virtually all of the reforms affected Yaqui Valley farmers because of the commercial character of their agriculture (relatively large, irrigated wheat farms...
Published on Jan 1, 1999in Agronomy Journal 1.80
W. R. Raun42
Estimated H-index: 42
,
G. V. Johnson27
Estimated H-index: 27
Worldwide, nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) for cereal production (wheat, Triticum aestivum L.; corn, Zea mays L.; rice, Oryza sativa L. and O. glaberrima Steud.; barley, Hordeum vulgare L.; sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench; millet, Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.; oat, Avena sativa L.; and rye, Secale cereale L.) is approximately 33%. The unaccounted 67% represents a $15.9 billion annual loss of N fertilizer (assuming fertilizer-soil equilibrium). Loss of fertilizer N results from gaseous plant...
Published on Apr 3, 1998in Science 41.04
Pamela A. Matson74
Estimated H-index: 74
,
Rosamond L. Naylor43
Estimated H-index: 43
,
Ivan Ortiz-Monasterio23
Estimated H-index: 23
Nitrogen fertilization is a substantial source of nitrogen-containing trace gases that have both regional and global consequences. In the intensive wheat systems of Mexico, typical fertilization practices lead to extremely high fluxes of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and nitric oxide (NO). In experiments, lower rates of nitrogen fertilizer, applied later in the crop cycle, reduced the loss of nitrogen without affecting yield and grain quality. Economic analyses projected this alternative practice to sav...
Published on Dec 1, 1974in Weed Research 1.86
J. C. Zadoks2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
T. T. Chang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute),
C. F. Konzak1
Estimated H-index: 1
(WSU: Washington State University)
The decimal code scale for indicating the growth stages of cereals as developed by the authors and published by Eucarpia is explained and described
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Published on Jun 1, 2019in Precision Agriculture 3.36
Melissa Stefanini1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UT: University of Tennessee),
James A. Larson20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UT: University of Tennessee)
+ 8 AuthorsHubert J. Savoy2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UT: University of Tennessee)
This research evaluated the profitability and nitrogen (N) efficiency of real time on-the-go optical sensing measurements (OPM) for variable-rate (VRT) N management for cotton. Two forms of OPM-based VRT N management and the existing farmer practice (FP) were used to determine N rates applied to cotton on 21 farm fields in the lower Mississippi River Basin states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Tennessee, USA. A modified version of the Schabenberger and Pierce on-farm experimentation mod...
Published on May 21, 2019in Soil Use and Management 1.96
Kathrin Grahmann3
Estimated H-index: 3
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Klaus Dittert26
Estimated H-index: 26
+ 2 AuthorsAndreas Buerkert34
Estimated H-index: 34
Published on Jan 29, 2019in Sustainability 2.59
Xinbing Wang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAU: China Agricultural University),
Yuxin Miao29
Estimated H-index: 29
+ 5 AuthorsDavid J. Mulla35
Estimated H-index: 35
Precision nitrogen (N) management (PNM) strategies are urgently needed for the sustainability of rain-fed maize (Zea mays L.) production in Northeast China. The objective of this study was to develop an active canopy sensor (ACS)-based PNM strategy for rain-fed maize through improving in-season prediction of yield potential (YP0), response index to side-dress N based on harvested yield (RIHarvest), and side-dress N agronomic efficiency (AENS). Field experiments involving six N rate treatments an...
Published on Aug 1, 2018in Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science 2.06
Kathrin Grahmann3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center),
Nele Verhulst9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center)
+ 2 AuthorsAndreas Buerkert34
Estimated H-index: 34
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center)
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 3.95
N. Millar15
Estimated H-index: 15
(MSU: Michigan State University),
Abisaí Urrea1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center)
+ 3 AuthorsIvan Ortiz-Monasterio23
Estimated H-index: 23
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center)
Abstract The Yaqui Valley, one of Mexico’s major breadbaskets, includes ∼230,000 ha of cultivated, irrigated cropland, with two thirds of the area planted annually to spring wheat ( Triticum turgidum) . Nitrogen (N) fertilizer applications to wheat have doubled since the 1980s, and currently average around 300 kg N ha −1 . Emissions of nitrous oxide (N 2 O), a potent greenhouse gas, increase following soil management activities, especially irrigation when N fertilizer is applied, and particularl...
Published on Apr 1, 2018in Field Crops Research 3.87
A.F. Colaço1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation),
R.G.V. Bramley1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
Abstract Crop sensing technologies to aid nitrogen management in grain crops have been the focus of an important element of Precision/Digital Agriculture research. We review sensor-based application research to explore the outcomes from this technology and provide guidelines for future developments in its application. Most studies report N fertilizer savings of 5–45% with little effect on grain yield, but a lack of consistent evidence of economic benefits limits adoption by farmers. Reported imp...
Published on Mar 24, 2018in Agriculture
Jelle Van Loon , Alicia B. Speratti4
Estimated H-index: 4
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Bram Govaerts34
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Precision agriculture technology at the hands of smallholder farmers in the developing world is often deemed far-fetched. Low-resource farmers, however, are the most susceptible to negative changes in the environment. Providing these farmers with the right tools to mitigate adversity and to gain greater control of the production process could unlock their potential and support rural communities to meet the increasing global food demand. In this study, a real-time variable rate fertilizer applica...
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Soil & Tillage Research 4.67
Kathrin Grahmann3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center),
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Estimated H-index: 9
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center)
+ 3 AuthorsAndreas Buerkert34
Estimated H-index: 34
Abstract Nitrate (NO 3 -N) leaching from agricultural soils can lead to substantial losses of fertilizer nitrogen (N) and cause considerable contamination of aquatic ecosystems and groundwater. This study aimed at estimating NO 3 -N leaching losses for three tillage-straw management systems in the intensely cropped Yaqui Valley, Northern Mexico using ion exchange resin samplers. To this end data were collected in 2013/2014 from a tillage experiment established in 2005 as a randomized complete bl...
Published on Jan 1, 2018in International Journal of Agronomy
Olga S. Walsh1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Sanaz Shafian4
Estimated H-index: 4
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Robin J. Christiaens1
Estimated H-index: 1
Nitrogen (N) is one of the most essential nutrients needed to reach maximum grain yield in all environments. Nitrogen fertilizers represent an important production cost, in both monetary and environmental terms. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of preplant nitrogen (N) rate and topdress N source on spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain yield and quality. Study was conducted in North-Central and Western Montana from 2011 to 2013 (total of 6 site-years). Six different preplant ni...
Published on Jan 1, 2018
Latief Ahmad2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology of Kashmir),
Syed Sheraz Mahdi1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology of Kashmir)
Site-specific nutrient management is a component of precision agriculture and can be used for any field or crop. It combines plant nutrient requirements at each growth stage and the soil’s ability to supply those nutrients and applies that information to areas within a field that require different management from the field average. Site-specific management allows for fine-tuning crop management systems along with 4R Nutrient Stewardship – the right source, rate, time, and place of nutrient use. ...