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Soft, Embeddable, Dry EEG Sensors for Real World Applications

Published on Jul 21, 2013
· DOI :10.1007/978-3-642-39454-6_28
Gene Davis6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Catherine McConnell1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsStephanie Korszen2
Estimated H-index: 2
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Abstract
Over the last decade, numerous papers have presented the use of dry electrodes capable of acquiring electroencephalogram (EEG) signals through hair. A few of these dry electrode prototypes have even progressed from lab-based EEG acquisition to commercial sales. While the field has improved rapidly as of late, most dry electrodes share a number of shortcomings that limit their potential real world applications including: 1) multiple rigid prongs that require sustained pressure to penetrate hair and maintain solid scalp contact, creating higher levels of discomfort when compared to standard wet sensors; 2) cumbersome or chin-strap-type applications for maintaining electrode contact, creating barriers to end user acceptance; 3) rigid active electrodes to compensate for high input impedances that limit flexibility and placement of sensors; 4) inability to safely imbed sensors under protective headgear, restricting use in some fields where EEG metrics are most desired; and 5) expensive sensor manufacturing that drives costs high for use across subjects. Under a recent DARPA Phase 3 contract, Advanced Brain Monitoring has developed a novel semi-dry sensor that addresses the current dry electrode shortcomings, opening up the door for new real world applications without compromising subject safety or comfort. The semi-dry sensor prototype was tested during a live performance requirement at the end of Phase 3, and successfully acquired EEG across all subject hair types over a 3 day testing period. The results from the performance requirement and subsequent results for new advancements to the prototype are presented here.
  • References (12)
  • Citations (2)
Cite
References12
Newest
Ronald H. Stevens32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles),
Trysha Galloway10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)
+ 5 AuthorsRobert Buckles1
Estimated H-index: 1
Our objective was to apply ideas from complexity theory to derive neurophysiologic models of Submarine Piloting and Navigation showing how teams cognitively organize around changes in the task and how this organization is altered with experience. The cognitive metric highlighted was an electroencephalography (EEG)-derived measure of engagement (termed NS_E) which was modeled into a collective team variable showing the engagement of each of 6 team members as well as the engagement of the team as ...
Published on Sep 1, 2012in IEEE Sensors Journal 3.08
Long-Fei Wang3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SJTU: Shanghai Jiao Tong University),
Liu Jingquan16
Estimated H-index: 16
(SJTU: Shanghai Jiao Tong University)
+ 1 AuthorsYang Chunsheng14
Estimated H-index: 14
(SJTU: Shanghai Jiao Tong University)
In this paper, a novel flexible dry electrode for long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) measurement is presented. Though the standard wet electrodes (Ag/AgCl) were used widely, they have their own drawbacks, such as the need for conductive gel and skin preparation, which causes the user discomfort and is unsafe, and cannot fit the long-term EEG measurement. To overcome these drawbacks of the wet electrodes, a novel flexible dry electrode made of Polydimethysiloxane is proposed; it works without c...
Published on Sep 1, 2012in Medical Engineering & Physics 1.78
N. S. Dias11
Estimated H-index: 11
(RMIT: RMIT University),
J. P. Carmo13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Minho)
+ 1 AuthorsJ. H. Correia25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Minho)
Abstract This paper presents a complete non-invasive Wireless acquisition system based on dry electrodes for electroencephalograms (WiDE-EEG) with emphasis in the electronic system design. The WiDE-EEG is composed by a 2.4 GHz radio-frequency (RF) transceiver, biopotential acquisition electronics and dry electrodes. The WiDE-EEG can acquire electroencephalogram (EEG) signals from 5 unipolar channels, with a resolution of 16 bits and minimum analog amplitude of 9.98 μV pp , at a sampling rate of ...
Published on Jul 1, 2012in Journal of Neuroscience Methods 2.79
Jeremy D. Slater12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston),
Giridhar P. Kalamangalam11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston),
Omotola A Hope6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston)
Abstract This study examines the difference in application times for routine electroencephalography (EEG) utilizing traditional electrodes and a “dry electrode” headset. The primary outcome measure was the time to interpretable EEG (TIE). A secondary outcome measure of recording quality and interpretability was obtained from EEG sample review by two blinded clinical neurophysiologists. With EEG samples obtained from 10 subjects, the average TIE for the “dry electrode” system was 139 s, and for t...
Published on Jun 1, 2012in Sensors and Actuators A-physical 2.74
Elena Forvi3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Polytechnic University of Milan),
Marzia Bedoni13
Estimated H-index: 13
+ 7 AuthorsFurio Gramatica11
Estimated H-index: 11
Abstract Monitoring biosignals, such as in electrocardiography (ECG), electromiography (EMG) and electroencephalography (EEG), is important for a better understanding of the pathological and physiological conditions of human subjects. In clinical practice the recording of biopotentials is carried out in general with wet electrodes, considered as the golden standard, although they have shown some limits: (i) the susceptibility to motions artifacts, critical aspect in ECG and EMG monitoring, (ii) ...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Frontiers in Neuroscience 3.65
Christoph Guger22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
Gunther Krausz6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 1 AuthorsGuenter Edlinger16
Estimated H-index: 16
Most brain-computer interfaces (BCI) rely on one of three types of signals in the electroencephalogram (EEG): P300s, steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEP), and event-related desynchronization (ERD). EEG is typically recorded non-invasively with electrodes mounted on the human scalp using conductive electrode gel for optimal impedance and data quality. The use of electrode gel entails serious problems that are especially pronounced in real-world settings when experts are not available. ...
Published on Oct 1, 2005in Chest 9.66
Philip R. Westbrook11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Daniel J. Levendowski14
Estimated H-index: 14
+ 4 AuthorsDennis Nicholson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Valley Hospital Medical Center)
Study objectives To evaluate the accuracy and practicality of the Apnea Risk Evaluation System (ARES; Advanced Brain Monitoring; Carlsbad, CA), a limited-channel system for diagnosing sleep apnea/hypopnea in the home. Design Prospective randomized study with blinded analysis. Settings Two independent, community-based, sleep-disorders centers and the participants' homes. Participants Two hundred ninety-nine subjects were recruited, including 210 consecutive willing patients referred by community ...
Cited By2
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2019
Mirjana Prpa3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Philippe Pasquier18
Estimated H-index: 18
(SFU: Simon Fraser University),
Philippe Pasquier2
Estimated H-index: 2
In this chapter, we present a state of the art on Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) use in contemporary art. We analyzed sixty-one artworks that employ BCI dating from 1965 to 2018, and present a taxonomy with five categories guiding the discussion of specific BCI artworks: input, mapping, output, format, and the presence of an audience. Moreover, we briefly present and discuss key points about BCI devices used in some of the artworks that are available on the market. Finally, we present insights f...
Published on Apr 1, 2015in Journal of Neuroscience Methods 2.79
Robbin Miranda2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
William D. Casebeer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(DARPA)
+ 10 AuthorsJustin C. Sanchez3
Estimated H-index: 3
(DARPA)
Abstract The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has funded innovative scientific research and technology developments in the field of brain–computer interfaces (BCI) since the 1970s. This review highlights some of DARPA's major advances in the field of BCI, particularly those made in recent years. Two broad categories of DARPA programs are presented with respect to the ultimate goals of supporting the nation's warfighters: (1) BCI efforts aimed at restoring neural and/or behaviora...