Match!

Inflammation, Depression, and Slow Gait: A High Mortality Phenotype in Later Life

Published on Feb 1, 2016in Journals of Gerontology Series A-biological Sciences and Medical Sciences4.71
· DOI :10.1093/gerona/glv156
Patrick J. Brown14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Columbia University),
Steven P. Roose52
Estimated H-index: 52
(Columbia University)
+ 9 AuthorsKristine Yaffe113
Estimated H-index: 113
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
Cite
Abstract
Inflammation, slow gait, and depression individually are associated with mortality, yet little is known about the trajectories of these measures, their interrelationships, or their collective impact on mortality.Longitudinal latent class analysis was used to evaluate trajectories of depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression ≥ 10), slow gait ( 3.2 pg/mL) using data from the Health Aging and Body Composition Study. Logistic regression was used to identify their associations with mortality.For each outcome, low-probability (n inflammation = 1,656, n slow gait = 1,471, n depression = 1,458), increasing-probability (n inflammation = 847, n slow gait = 880, n depression = 1,062), and consistently high-probability (n inflammation = 572, n slow gait = 724, n depression = 555) trajectories were identified, with 22% of all participants classified as having increasing or consistently high-probability trajectories on inflammation, slow gait, and depression (meaning probability of impairment on each outcome increased from low to moderate/high or remained high over 10 years). Trajectories of slow gait were associated with inflammation (r = .40, p < .001) and depression (r = .49, p < .001). Although worsening trajectories of inflammation were independently associated with mortality (p < .001), the association between worsening trajectories of slow gait and mortality was only present in participants with worsening depression trajectories (p < .01). Participants with increasing/consistently high trajectories of depression and consistently high trajectories of inflammation and slow gait (n = 247) have an adjusted-morality rate of 85.2%, greater than all other classification permutations.Comprehensive assessment of older adults is warranted for the development of treatment strategies targeting a high-mortality risk phenotype consisting of inflammation, depression, and slow gait speed.
  • References (43)
  • Citations (17)
Cite
References43
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Biological Psychiatry11.50
Neil A. Harrison33
Estimated H-index: 33
(BSMS: Brighton and Sussex Medical School),
E. Cooper6
Estimated H-index: 6
(BSMS: Brighton and Sussex Medical School)
+ 4 AuthorsMara Cercignani46
Estimated H-index: 46
(BSMS: Brighton and Sussex Medical School)
Background Systemic inflammation impairs brain function and is increasingly implicated in the etiology of common mental illnesses, particularly depression and Alzheimer’s disease. Immunotherapies selectively targeting proinflammatory cytokines demonstrate efficacy in a subset of patients with depression. However, efforts to identify patients most vulnerable to the central effects of inflammation are hindered by insensitivity of conventional structural magnetic resonance imaging.
Published on Jun 1, 2015in JAMA Psychiatry15.92
Andrew H. Miller81
Estimated H-index: 81
(Emory University),
Charles L. Raison43
Estimated H-index: 43
(UA: University of Arizona)
These data re-vealreliableassociationsofinflammatorymarkerswithpsychiatricdisorders,theinductionofpsychiatricsymp-tomsfollowingadministrationofinflammatorystimuli,theassociationofinflammation-relatedgeneswithpsy-chiatricdisease,andtheelucidationofneurobiologicaland immunological mechanisms by which inflamma-tion targets neurotransmitters and neurocircuits tochange behavior. Nevertheless, whether therapeuticstrategiesthatinhibitinflammationwillbeeffectiveintreatingpsychiatricillnessesremainsuncle...
Published on May 1, 2015in Brain Behavior and Immunity6.17
Ebrahim Haroon21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Emory University),
Jennifer C. Felger22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Emory University)
+ 5 AuthorsAndrew H. Miller81
Estimated H-index: 81
(Emory University)
Abstract Inflammation-induced alterations in central nervous system (CNS) metabolism have focused on glutamate. At excessive concentrations, glutamate is toxic to glia and neurons, and inflammatory cytokines have been shown to influence glutamate turnover by blocking glutamate reuptake and increasing glutamate release. Increased glutamate has also been found in depression, a disorder associated with increased inflammation. Data by our group have shown increased glutamate as measured by magnetic ...
Published on Dec 1, 2014in Neurobiology of Aging4.40
Andrea L. Metti11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Pittsburgh),
Kristine Yaffe113
Estimated H-index: 113
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
+ 7 AuthorsJane A. Cauley146
Estimated H-index: 146
(University of Pittsburgh)
We aimed to examine trajectories of inflammatory markers and cognitive decline over 10 years. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) trajectory components (slope, variability, and baseline level) and cognitive decline among 1,323 adults, age 70 to 79 years in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. We tested for interactions by sex and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype. In models adjusted for multiple co...
Published on Nov 1, 2014in American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry3.49
Patrick J. Brown14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Columbia University),
Steven P. Roose52
Estimated H-index: 52
(Columbia University)
+ 6 AuthorsKirsten Avlund43
Estimated H-index: 43
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
Objective To identify salient characteristics of frailty that increase risk of death in depressed elders . Methods Data were from the Nordic Research on Ageing Study from research sites in Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. Participants were 1,027 adults aged 75 years (436 men and 591 women). Time of death was obtained, providing a maximum survival time of 11.08 years (initial evaluation took place between 1988 and 1991) . Results Depressed elders showed greater baseline impairments in each frailty c...
Published on Sep 3, 2014in PLOS ONE2.78
Achille Edem Tchalla8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Alyssa B. Dufour18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Harvard University)
+ 4 AuthorsLewis A. Lipsitz89
Estimated H-index: 89
(Harvard University)
Background: Falls may occur as unpredictable events or in patterns indicative of potentially modifiable risks and predictive of adverse outcomes. Knowing the patterns, risks, and outcomes of falls trajectories may help clinicians plan appropriate preventive measures. We hypothesized that clinically distinct trajectories of falls progression, baseline predictors and their coincident clinical outcomes could be identified. Methods: We studied 765 community-dwelling participants in the MOBILIZE Bost...
Published on Sep 1, 2014in Frontiers of Medicine in China
Emanuele Marzetti40
Estimated H-index: 40
(UCSC: Catholic University of the Sacred Heart),
Francesco Landi63
Estimated H-index: 63
(UCSC: Catholic University of the Sacred Heart)
+ 8 AuthorsChristiaan Leeuwenburgh73
Estimated H-index: 73
(UF: University of Florida)
Background. Chronic, low–grade inflammation and declining physical function are hallmarks of the aging process. However, previous attempts to correlate individual inflammatory biomarkers with physical performance in older people have produced mixed results. Given the complexity of the inflammatory response, the simultaneous analysis of an array of inflammatory mediators may provide more insights into the relationship between inflammation and age–related physical function decline. This study was ...
Terri Fowler3
Estimated H-index: 3
(MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina),
Catherine O. Durham3
Estimated H-index: 3
(MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina)
+ 1 AuthorsBarbara J. Edlund8
Estimated H-index: 8
(MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina)
PURPOSE Annually, approximately 90 million prescriptions are filled for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with the number prescribed for older adults approximately three times higher than for younger adults. This article examines the benefits and risk of NSAID use in older adults. Data sources Electronic data collection of research studies, evidence-based reviews, consensus statements, and guidelines related to the purpose of this article were analyzed if published between 2000 and 2...
Published on Jul 1, 2014in JAMA Psychiatry15.92
Thomas R. Insel97
Estimated H-index: 97
(NIH: National Institutes of Health),
Nitin Gogtay47
Estimated H-index: 47
(NIH: National Institutes of Health)
Claudio Franceschi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UNIBO: University of Bologna),
Judith Campisi89
Estimated H-index: 89
(LBNL: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
Human aging is characterized by a chronic, low-grade inflammation, and this phenomenon has been termed as “inflam maging.” Inflammaging is a highly significant risk factor for both morbidity and mortality in the elderly people, as most if not all age-related diseases share an inflammatory pathogenesis. Nevertheless, the precise etiology of inflammaging and its potential causal role in contributing to adverse health outcomes remain largely unknown. The identification of pathways that control age-...
Cited By17
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2019in American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry3.49
Patrick J. Brown14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Columbia University),
Nicholas Brennan (NIH: National Institutes of Health)+ 8 AuthorsRichard G. Spencer30
Estimated H-index: 30
(NIH: National Institutes of Health)
ABSTRACT Objective Late-life depression (LLD) is a chronic and heterogeneous disorder. Recent studies have implicated non-normative age-related processes in its pathogenesis. This investigation examined both cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and LLD. Methods Data from 603 men and women from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study on Aging were analyzed, of whom 167 provided data from a follow-up visit. Muscle bioenergetics was measured by poste...
Published on Sep 1, 2019in Psychoneuroendocrinology4.01
Alejandro de la Torre-Luque6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid),
José Luis Ayuso-Mateos43
Estimated H-index: 43
(UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid)
+ 2 AuthorsPilar Lopez-Garcia7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid)
Abstract Late-life depression is a highly prevalent mental health condition with devastating consequences even from its earliest stages. Alterations in physiological functions, such as inflammatory and metabolic, have been described in patients with depression. However, little is known on the association between depression symptom course and metabolic and inflammation dysregulation. This study aimed to depict the course of depression symptoms while ageing, taking into consideration inter-individ...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Biological Psychiatry11.50
Bret R. Rutherford18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Columbia University),
Mark Slifstein53
Estimated H-index: 53
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 8 AuthorsEmily Valente
Abstract Background A high-risk subgroup of older patients with depression has slowed processing and gait speeds. This study examined whether carbidopa/levodopa (L-DOPA) monotherapy increased dopamine availability, increased processing/gait speed, and relieved depressive symptoms. Methods Adult outpatients with depression >59 years old underwent baseline [ 11 C]raclopride positron emission tomography followed by open L-DOPA for 3 weeks (1 week each of 150 mg, 300 mg, and 450 mg). Generalized est...
Published on May 1, 2019
Wolfgang Kemmler27
Estimated H-index: 27
(FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg),
Simon von Stengel18
Estimated H-index: 18
(FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)
+ 2 AuthorsEllen Freiberger17
Estimated H-index: 17
(FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)
Purpose Declines in muscle mass and function are inevitable during the aging process. However, what is the “normal age appropriate” decline of muscle mass and function? Further, is this decline uniform for muscle mass versus functions or between different functional abilities? Using recognized Sarcopenia criteria [i.e. skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) defined as appendicular skeletal muscle mass/height (kg/m2), handgrip strength, gait velocity], the aim of the present project was to determine co...
Published on May 1, 2019in The American Journal of Medicine4.76
Davide L Vetrano1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Stockholm University),
Debora Rizzuto15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Stockholm University)
+ 6 AuthorsLaura Fratiglioni1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Stockholm University)
Abstract Background We investigated the impact of multiple cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric diseases on all-cause and cause-specific mortality in older adults, considering their functional status. Methods This cohort study included 3241 participants (aged≥60years) in the Swedish National study of Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (SNAC-K). Number of cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric diseases was categorized as 0, 1, or≥2. Functional impairment was defined as walking speed of Results After 3year...
Published on Jan 1, 2019
Priscila Pascarelli Pedrico Nascimento1
Estimated H-index: 1
(State University of Campinas),
Samila Sathler Tavares Batistoni6
Estimated H-index: 6
(USP: University of São Paulo)
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Clinical Nutrition6.40
Martín Laclaustra24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid),
Fernando Rodríguez Artalejo66
Estimated H-index: 66
(UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid)
+ 4 AuthorsEsther López-García38
Estimated H-index: 38
(UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid)
Summary Background Certain foods and dietary patterns have been associated with both inflammation and frailty. As chronic inflammation may play a role in frailty and disability, we examined the association of the inflammatory potential of diet with these outcomes. Methods Data were taken from 1948 community-dwelling individuals ≥60 years old from the Seniors-ENRICA cohort, who were recruited in 2008–2010 and followed-up through 2012. Baseline diet data, obtained with a validated diet history, wa...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in BMC Psychology
Hirotaka Iijima9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Kyoto University),
Tomoki Aoyama29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Kyoto University)
+ 8 AuthorsHiroshi Kuroki14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Kyoto University)
Depressive symptoms are a major comorbidity in older adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, the type of activity-induced knee pain associated with depression has not been examined. Furthermore, there is conflicting evidence regarding the association between depression and performance-based physical function. This study aimed to examine (i) the association between depressive symptoms and knee pain intensity, particularly task-specific knee pain during daily living, and (ii) the associatio...
Patrick J. Brown14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Columbia University),
Melanie M. Wall64
Estimated H-index: 64
(Columbia University)
+ 4 AuthorsBret R. Rutherford18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Columbia University)
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Experimental Gerontology3.08
Frederico Pieruccini-Faria2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UWO: University of Western Ontario),
Susan Muir-Hunter4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UWO: University of Western Ontario),
Manuel Montero-Odasso27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UWO: University of Western Ontario)
Abstract Background: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and depression independently affect balance control in older adults. However, it is uncertain whether depressive symptoms would amplify balance problems in older adults with MCI. Aim: To evaluate if the presence of significant depressive symptoms affects postural sway under somatosensory challenges in a MCI population. Methods: Eighty two participants (mean of 75.3 ± 6.4 years of age; 46% women) with MCI completed cognitive and balance assessm...