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The Effect of Yaji-Meat-Sauce Consumption on Cerebellar Neurons of White Albino Rats

Published on Jan 1, 2011
A. O. Nwaopara4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
A. M. Izunya4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 3 AuthorsG. P. Oyadonghon1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract
This study on the cerebellum is one in the series of several studies aimed at determining the effects of Yaji on the histology of the brain. Eighteen-week-old white albino rats of an average weight of 170 g were used for this study and they were divided into eight (8) groups (A-H). Group A served as control while groups B-H served as the test groups. For 2 weeks, group A received normal feed only, while groups B-H received feed plus graded levels of Yaji (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70%, respectively) per ration of feed daily. The results showed distortions in the cellular architecture of the cerebellum irrespective of the dosage. The micrographs presented histological signs of purkinge cell degeneration and the clumping of granular cells with cerebellar cavitations. Our findings suggests that Yaji has neurotoxic potentials, which 'illuminates' further the rising concern about the safety of Yaji consumption even beyond the shores of Nigeria, as well as re-echo the urgent need to regulate the production and consumption of Yaji.
  • References (22)
  • Citations (5)
References22
Newest
Published on Nov 30, 2009
Ao Nwaopara3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Cip Anibeze3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Abia State University),
Fc Akpuaka2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Abia State University)
Yaji is a complex mixture of groundnut cake powder, additives, spices and salt. The production and consumption of Yaji is not regulated despite the excitotoxic, apoptotic and tumourigenic potentials of some of its active principles. This has been the basis for several scientific investigations aimed at determining the effect of Yaji on different body organs. The present study on the brain is intended to determine its tumourigenic potentials. Eighteen weeks old white albino rats of an average wei...
Ao Nwaopara3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Chilie Anibeze1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsSharon Nwaopara1
Estimated H-index: 1
Spices and herbs have been used for thousands of centuries as preservatives for foods and for medicinal purposes. Some of these spices and herbs possess antimicrobial potentials that may, in combination, be considered as alternatives to conventional antimicrobial agents especially in this era of antimicrobial drug resistance. Our interest however, is on the widely consumed Nigerian suya meat sauce called Yaji. It is a complex mixture of salt, ginger, clove, red pepper and black pepper, all of wh...
Published on Feb 1, 2008in Pakistan Journal of Nutrition
A.O. Nwaopara2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Ambrose Alli University),
M.A.C. Odike2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Ambrose Alli University)
+ 2 AuthorsG.I. Ewere1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Ambrose Alli University)
Allergic reactions have been associated with cloves, black pepper and mast cells. The presence of mast cells and renal fibrosis has also been reported and in line with an ongoing investigation on the effects of excessive consumption of Yaji the complex Nigerian meat sauce, this study was designed to correlate the individual and combined effects of the excessive consumption of Yaji-spices (ginger, clove, red pepper and black pepper) on the histology of the kidney, using 12 adult rabbits. The anim...
Published on Jan 1, 2008in African Journal of Biotechnology
High cost of choice meat used in suya production makes the product an exclusive meat for the rich. In order to make suya (an intermediate moisture meat) available and affordable to the common man thereby increasing their animal protein intake, this experiment therefore become imperative. Meat from the semimembranosus (SM), biceps femoris (BF) and psoas major (PM) muscles were used for the study. The muscles were carefully excised and trimmed of all visible connective tissue. The meat was sliced ...
Published on Jun 1, 2007in Pakistan Journal of Nutrition
A.O. Nwaopara2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
M.A.C. Odike2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 1 AuthorsM.I. Adoye1
Estimated H-index: 1
Yaji, otherwise ‘suya sauce’, used in serving the meat delicacy called ‘Suya’, is a complex mixture of spices and additives whose active ingredients on individual basis, are known to have side effects if consumed in excess. The growing concern is that the excessive consumption of Yaji signifies an excessive consumption of a combination of these constituents amongst which are ginger, cloves, red pepper and black pepper; which are mixed without a standardized format. This study was therefore desig...
Published on Dec 31, 2006in The Internet Journal of Neurology
A.O. Eweka6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
F.A.E. Om'Iniabohs1
Estimated H-index: 1
Histological effects of Monosodium glutamate (MSG) commonly used as food additive on the cerebellum of adult Wistar rats were carefully studied. The rats of both sexes (n=24), average weight of 185g were randomly assigned into two treatments (n=16) and control (n=8) groups. The rats in the treatment groups received 3g and 6g of MSG thoroughly mixed with their feeds for fourteen days, while the control rats received equal amounts of feeds without MSG added. The rats were fed with growers' mash pu...
Published on May 1, 2006in Pakistan Journal of Nutrition
R.E. Uzeh1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
R.E. Ohenhen1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
O.O. Adeniji1
Estimated H-index: 1
1 Abstract: Samples of raw meat prior to roasting, and tsire-suya were analyzed bacteriologically for total viable, coliform, staphylococcal counts and the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The sensitivity of the bacterial isolates to some antibiotics and spices was evaluated. The total viable count varied from 20x10 to 289x10 cfu/g for the raw meat and 7x10 2 2 2 in tsire-suya. P. aeruginosa, B. cereus, S. aureus, and E. coli, were ...
Published on Jan 1, 2004
Matthew. Hynd1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Mar 1, 2003in Neurochemistry International 3.99
Monica E. Ureña-Guerrero8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Guadalajara),
Silvia López-Pérez9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Guadalajara),
Carlos Beas-Zarate21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Mexican Social Security Institute)
Abstract Monosodium glutamate (MSG) produces neurodegeneration in several brain regions when it is administered to neonatal rats. From an early embryonic age to adulthood, GABA neurons appear to have functional glutamatergic receptors, which could convert them in an important target for excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Changes in the activity of the GABA synthesizing enzyme, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), have been shown after different neuronal insults. Therefore, this work evaluates the effe...
Cited By5
Newest
Published on Jul 3, 2015
Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biological Sciences (An international peer-reviewed Bi-monthly journal) is a peer-reviewed journal of high quality devoted to provide a platform to scientists and researchers all over the world, for the dissemination of knowledge in the field of Pharmaceutical, Biological and other allied sciences. The journal policy is to publish work deemed by peer reviewers to be a coherent and sound addition to scientific knowledge and to put less emphasis on interest levels, pr...
Published on Jan 1, 2013
This 6-week study investigates the effect of Yaji on body and organ weights of rats averagely weighing 229g. The rats (n=32) were divided into 4 groups (A-D) with 2 subgroups (A1-D1 and A2-D2) respectively. Group A served as the control, while B-D served as tests. B1, C1, and D1 (n=8 each), received 80g/20g, 60g/40g and 40g/60g of feed/ Yaji respectively for a period of 3 weeks (acute period), while B2, C2 and D2 (n=4 each) received 40g/10g, 30g/20g and 20g/30g of feed/ Yaji respectively for the...
Published on Jan 1, 2013
Lo Okonkwo1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Fl Dada1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 3 AuthorsCp Ozougwu1
Estimated H-index: 1
This study investigates the effect of tobacco snuff on renal function using Wistar rat as a model. It involved adult rats (n=42) weighing 150-300g. They were assigned into a control group (A; n=6) and test groups B (n=12), C (n=12) and D (n=12). The groups were further divided into subgroups (1, 2, 3 and 4) representing durations of 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks respectively. The test groups were fed varying doses of tobacco snuff (tobacco plus potash). At the end of every 2 weeks, three randomly selected...
Published on Jan 1, 2013
Bn Obodo1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Fk Iweka1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 5 AuthorsCf Okoye1
Estimated H-index: 1
This study investigates the possible toxic effect of Xylopia aethiopica on liver function via the evaluation of some serum biochemical parameters. The study involved 24 adult rats with weight ranging from 150 to 300g and divided into four groups of 6 rats each (A, B, C and D). For 21 days, varying doses of 1.2g/kg, 3.0g/kg and 6.0g/kg per body weight of Xylopia aethiopica leaves powder were administered daily to test groups B, C and D respectively. Group A however served as control that received...
Published on Jan 1, 2013
Ci Ugbor , Gra Okogun + 5 AuthorsSn Ekoh
This study was designed to investigate the changes in liver biochemical profile following oral tobacco dust ingestion. Adult Wistar rats (42) weighing 150-300g were involved. They were divided into four groups; group A serving as control, while groups B, C and D served as the test groups. The test groups were further divided into four groups (B1, C1, D1; B2, C2, D2; B3, C3, D3; and B4, C4, D4) representing four experimental phases/duration of 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks respectively. The rats were fed w...
Published on Jan 1, 2013
Bn Obodo1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Fk Iweka1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsGe Agbo1
Estimated H-index: 1
The effect of Xylopia aethiopica leaves on body weight and growth performance was studied on growing Wistar rats. The study involved twenty-four rats of comparable sizes and weights ranging from 150 to 300g and divided into four groups of six rats each. Group A served as the control while groups B, C and D served as the test and received 1.2g, 3.0g and 6.0g per day of Xylopia aethiopica leaves respectively for 21 days. The feed intake and weights of both the test animal and control were monitore...