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Ingratiation as an adapting strategy: Its relationship with career adaptability, career sponsorship, and promotability

Published on Feb 1, 2016in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
· DOI :10.1016/j.jvb.2015.11.011
Hataya Sibunruang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Sussex),
Patrick Raymund James M. Garcia11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UVM: University of Vermont),
Laramie R. Tolentino6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Monash University)
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Abstract
Guided by the Career Construction Theory (Savickas, 2013), our research model posits that individuals rely on their adaptability resources and implement adapting responses, in the form of ingratiation, to increase their promotability at work. In addition, the indirect relationship between career adaptability and promotability via ingratiation is further strengthened by high career sponsorship. The research model was tested and the translated Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) Thailand form was validated using a cross-sectional survey of 265 subordinate–supervisor dyads. Results demonstrate adequate levels of internal consistency (ɑ = .96) and the factor structure corresponded with prior CAAS international validation. The moderated mediation model was supported and as expected: (a) ingratiation, as an adapting response, mediated the positive relationship between career adaptability and promotability, and (b) the mediated relationship between career adaptability and promotability via ingratiation was stronger for individuals with higher career sponsorship. Taken together, the findings support the cross-national measurement equivalence and utility of CAAS in non-Western and developing countries. More importantly, our study offers the groundwork for understanding adapting responses and the augmenting role of career-specific contextual support.
  • References (48)
  • Citations (10)
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References48
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Journal of Business Ethics 3.80
Alessandra Capezio7
Estimated H-index: 7
(ANU: Australian National University),
Lu Wang8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UNSW: University of New South Wales)
+ 2 AuthorsVinh Nhat Lu10
Estimated H-index: 10
(ANU: Australian National University)
Integrating power dependence and gender role theories, we investigate the interactive effects of followers’ gender and leaders’ Machiavellian orientation in predicting followers’ usage of upward influence tactics. Using a sample of 156 matched leader–follower dyads, we found that followers’ gender moderated the relationship between Time 1 leaders’ Machiavellian orientation and followers’ use of upward influence tactics at Time 2 (6 months later). Specifically, the relationship between Time 1 lea...
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Sílvia Monteiro9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Minho),
Leandro S. Almeida24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Minho)
Abstract This study analyzed the psychometric properties and the factor structure of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS)—Portugal HE Form with 406 graduate students and explored the relationship between career adaptability, work experience, extracurricular activities and work transition. The analysis allows us to conclude that CAAS can be a valid and useful measurement for assessing career adaptability in Portuguese graduates. The differential analysis evidenced that participants with studen...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Weiguo Yang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(RUC: Renmin University of China),
Yanjun Guan18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Surrey)
+ 2 AuthorsAndrew Lockwood24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Surrey)
Based on career construction theory, the current research examined the relationship between career adaptability and perceived overqualification among a sample of Chinese human resource management professionals (N = 220). The results of a survey study showed that career adaptability predicted perceived overqualification through a dual-path model: On the one hand, career adaptability positively predicted employees' perceived delegation, which had a subsequent negative effect on perceived overquali...
Published on Apr 1, 2015in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Andreas Hirschi24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Bern),
Anne Herrmann9
Estimated H-index: 9
(NU: Northwestern University),
Anita C. Keller7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Bern)
The literature on career adaptation is vast and based on a range of different measurement approaches. The present paper aims to explore how different operationalizations of career adaptability in terms of concern, control, curiosity, and confidence are related from a conceptual and empirical standpoint. Based on a cross-sectional analysis with 1260 German university students, we established that the adaptability resources of concern, control, curiosity, and confidence are significantly related t...
Published on Feb 1, 2015in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Brian J. Taber5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Oakland University),
Maureen Blankemeyer9
Estimated H-index: 9
(KSU: Kent State University)
Abstract This study examined the motivational resource of future work self salience and the additive effect of career adaptability dimensions in the prediction of career planning, proactive skill development, and proactive career networking in a sample of university students ( N = 113). It was hypothesized that greater clarity of future work self would predict engagement in each of the proactive career behaviors and that specific dimensions of career adaptability would have an additive effect in...
Published on Dec 1, 2013in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Laramie R. Tolentino6
Estimated H-index: 6
(ANU: Australian National University),
Patrick Raymund James M. Garcia11
Estimated H-index: 11
(ANU: Australian National University)
+ 2 AuthorsRobert L. Tang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(La Salle University)
Abstract This paper presents the validation of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) in the Philippine context. The CAAS consists of four subscales, with six items each, measuring self-regulative psychosocial resources (e.g., concern, curiosity, control, and confidence) for coping with occupational tasks and transitions. Filipino university students ( N = 289) and working adults ( N = 495) participated in the study. Internal consistency estimates for the full scale and subscales ranged from .8...
Published on Jan 1, 2013
Andrew F. Hayes40
Estimated H-index: 40
(OSU: Ohio State University)
Part I: Fundamental Concepts. Introduction. A Scientist in Training. Questions of Whether, If, How, and When. Conditional Process Analysis. Correlation, Causality, and Statistical Modeling. Statistical Software. Overview of this Book. Chapter Summary. Simple Linear Regression. Correlation and Prediction. The Simple Linear Regression Equation. Statistical Inference. Assumptions for Interpretation and Statistical Inference. Chapter Summary. Multiple Linear Regression. The Multiple Linear Regressio...
Published on Dec 1, 2012in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
J. Koen7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UvA: University of Amsterdam),
Ute-Christine Klehe21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Giessen),
Annelies E. M. Van Vianen32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
The transition from school to work is one of the most critical steps in graduates' careers, as it can determine vocational outcomes and future career success. Yet, these newcomers to the labor market often take longer than regular job seekers to find a suitable job, are more likely to experience a job mismatch and to suffer from underemployment. In this study, we proposed that career adaptability might help remedy this problem. We therefore developed a training aimed at providing graduates with ...
Published on Jun 1, 2012in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Mark L. Savickas36
Estimated H-index: 36
(NEOMED: Northeast Ohio Medical University),
Erik J. Porfeli15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NEOMED: Northeast Ohio Medical University)
Abstract Researchers from 13 countries collaborated in constructing a psychometric scale to measure career adaptability. Based on four pilot tests, a research version of the proposed scale consisting of 55 items was field tested in 13 countries. The resulting Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) consists of four scales, each with six items. The four scales measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and ...
Published on Jun 1, 2012in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Jérôme Rossier27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UNIL: University of Lausanne),
Gregory Zecca7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UNIL: University of Lausanne)
+ 2 AuthorsJean-Pierre Dauwalder6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UNIL: University of Lausanne)
Abstract The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) in a French-speaking Swiss sample and its relationship with personality dimensions and work engagement. The heterogeneous sample of 391 participants ( M age = 39.59, SD = 12.30) completed the CAAS-International and a short version of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. To assess personality dimensions, participants completed either the Zuckerman–Kuhlman–Aluja Personality Questionna...
Cited By10
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Karyn Dossinger1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Suffolk University),
Connie R. Wanberg29
Estimated H-index: 29
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
+ 1 AuthorsLisa M. Leslie17
Estimated H-index: 17
(NYU: New York University)
Abstract The positive relationship between physical attractiveness and earnings is well-established, but explanations for why this effect exists are still in a nascent state. By integrating status characteristics theory with sponsored-mobility perspectives on career success, we propose that attractive individuals receive more organizational sponsorship in the form of higher career exposure and visibility and higher access to organizational resources, mediating the relationship between physical a...
Published on Apr 26, 2019in Human Relations 3.37
Rajiv K. Amarnani1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UWA: University of Western Australia),
Jennifer Ann L. Lajom2
Estimated H-index: 2
(ECU: Edith Cowan University)
+ 1 AuthorsAlessandra Capezio7
Estimated H-index: 7
(ANU: Australian National University)
Does passion predict performance? Whereas harmonious passion is typically associated with strong performance, evidence for the obsessive passion-performance relationship has been so far inconclusive. The mixed results in the literature suggest that there are hitherto unexamined boundary conditions and mechanisms shaping the relationship between obsessive passion and performance. This study draws on principles from conservation of resources and the dual-systems model of self-regulation to explain...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Patrick Raymund James M. Garcia11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Macquarie University),
Simon Lloyd D. Restubog29
Estimated H-index: 29
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
+ 2 AuthorsRobert L. Tang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(La Salle University)
Abstract Drawing from Career Construction Theory (Savickas, 2013) and Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1986), we examine role modeling as a socialization mechanism that facilitates the transmission of career adaptability across generations. The proposed serial mediation model was tested using 187 grandparent-parent-grandchild triads. Results showed that role modeling mediated the relationships between grandparents', parents', and grandchildren's career adaptability. Furthermore, we found suppor...
Published on Dec 19, 2018in Journal of Career Assessment 1.71
Laramie Tolentino (Macquarie University), Hataya Sibunruang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Patrick Raymund James M. Garcia11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Macquarie University)
This article examines the relationship between career adaptability, self-monitoring, academic effort, and job search self-efficacy among university students. Guided by the career construction and self-monitoring theories, we propose that self-monitoring mediates the relationship between career adaptability and job search self-efficacy. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the indirect relationship is stronger for those with high academic effort. We test our proposed model using two samples (Sample 1...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in South African Journal of Psychology 0.78
Marthe-Marie Pienaar (University of Pretoria)
This article explores the possible effects of group-based life design-related counselling on the sense of self of female adolescent peer supporters. Convenience and purposive sampling were used to select 24 participants at a private school (mean age = 16.5 years; standard deviation = 6.4 months). A parallel interactive mixed-method design, embedded in an intervention framework, was used to gather data. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre- and post-test scores obtained on the Ca...
Published on Nov 5, 2018in International Journal of Manpower 0.88
Sofija Pajic1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UvA: University of Amsterdam),
Ádám Keszler (BT: BT Group)+ 2 AuthorsDeanne N. Den Hartog44
Estimated H-index: 44
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
Purpose With the ageing global population the demand for nursing jobs and the requirements for complex care provision are increasing. In consequence, nursing professionals need to be ready to adapt, obtain variety of skills and engage in career self-management. The purpose of this paper is to investigate individual, micro-level, resources and behaviors that can facilitate matching processes between nursing professionals and their jobs. Design/methodology/approach A survey-based study was conduct...
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Cort W. Rudolph10
Estimated H-index: 10
(SLU: Saint Louis University),
Kristi N. Lavigne4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SLU: Saint Louis University)
+ 1 AuthorsHannes Zacher30
Estimated H-index: 30
(QUT: Queensland University of Technology)
Abstract As the work environment becomes more dynamic, adaptability is becoming increasingly important. Career adaptability refers to a set of psychosocial resources that help individuals successfully manage career-related tasks and transitions. The number of publications on career adaptability has increased rapidly over the past five years. Grounded in career construction theory, the current study provides a dimension-level meta-analysis of 76 career adaptability studies, examining relationship...
Federica Bocciardi1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Verona),
Andrea Caputo5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Sapienza University of Rome)
+ 2 AuthorsRiccardo Sartori13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Verona)
Purpose In the current labour market, the competence to adapt is becoming significantly relevant for career development and career success. The construct of career adaptability, i.e. the capability to adapt to changing career-related circumstances and predict advancement in career development, seems to provide a fruitful scientific base for successful career intervention. The purpose of the study is exploratory, with the aim of providing new findings about the key predictors of this meta-compete...
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Zhou Jiang9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Griffith University)
Abstract This study is the first to test career adaptability as an antecedent of the job content plateau. Based on career construction theory and person-environment fit theory, it examined the mediating effects of person-job fit and person-organization fit on the relationship between career adaptability and the job content plateau. Results from 270 full time workers showed that employees with higher levels of career adaptability were less likely to experience job content plateaus. Partial mediat...