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The specialist nursing workforce caring for men with prostate cancer in the UK

Published on Mar 1, 2016in International Journal of Urological Nursing
· DOI :10.1111/ijun.12104
Alison Leary7
Estimated H-index: 7
(LSBU: London South Bank University),
Jane Brocksom3
Estimated H-index: 3
(St James's University Hospital)
+ 7 AuthorsPhilippa Aslet1
Estimated H-index: 1
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Abstract
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK accounting for 25% of all new cases of cancer. It is predicted to become the most common cancer overall by 2030. A national survey of the specialist nursing workforce caring for men with prostate cancer was completed across the four countries of the UK during June and July 2014. In total 302 specialist nurses completed the survey and data from 285 was used in the analysis. This is the biggest whole population survey of this workforce in recent years. The most common job title was clinical nurse specialist (185) and the most common band was agenda for change band 7 (174). However in Scotland 50% of the respondents stated that they were paid on band 6. Over half the group (158) had worked in prostate cancer care for more than 10 years. Few (48) had come into specialist posts from a specific specialist nurse development role. There is wide geographic variation in the provision of specialist nursing for men with prostate cancer. This is reflected in available hours and caseload sizes. The respondents reported frozen and vacant posts across the UK. This equated to 58·3 full time equivalents. The work of specialist nurses caring for men with prostate cancer is clinically complex and appears to cover most key times in the cancer journey. However workload appears to be limiting the care that the nurses are able to provide with over half the respondents (163) saying that they left work undone for patients.
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  • Citations (8)
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References7
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2012in British Journal of Cancer5.42
Jacob Maddams4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Martin Utley26
Estimated H-index: 26
(UCL: University College London),
Henrik Møller67
Estimated H-index: 67
BACKGROUND There are currently two million cancer survivors in the United Kingdom, and in recent years this number has grown by 3% per annum. The aim of this paper is to provide long-term projections of cancer prevalence in the United Kingdom. METHODS National cancer registry data for England were used to estimate cancer prevalence in the United Kingdom in 2009. Using a model of prevalence as a function of incidence, survival and population demographics, projections were made to 2040. Different ...
Published on Mar 1, 2012in Journal of Advanced Nursing2.38
Grainne Lowe3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Monash University),
Virginia Plummer11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Monash University)
+ 1 AuthorsLeanne Boyd4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Monash University)
Lowe G., Plummer V., O’Brien A.P. & Boyd L. (2012) Time to clarify – the value of advanced practice nursing roles in health care. Journal of Advanced Nursing68(3), 677–685. Abstract Aim. This article presents a discussion of the importance of providing meaningful advanced practice nursing role definition and clarity to improve international standards of nursing titles and scopes of practice. Background. A plethora of international literature exists discussing advanced practice nursing roles and ...
Published on Nov 1, 2011in British Journal of Cancer5.42
M Mistry1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
D M Parkin1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsPeter Sasieni48
Estimated H-index: 48
Quantifying the future burden of cancer incidence and mortality, in terms of expected numbers of cases and deaths, or rates of disease, is important in optimising the allocation of resources for screening, diagnostic, therapeutic and palliative services and to provide a baseline from which the success of future interventions can be judged (Bray and Moller, 2006). The future number of cases (or deaths) is a consequence of two components of change; the evolution of the size and age structure of th...
Published on Apr 1, 2011in European Journal of Oncology Nursing1.70
Carole Farrell6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Alexander Molassiotis Rn46
Estimated H-index: 46
(University of Manchester)
+ 1 AuthorsCathy Heaven11
Estimated H-index: 11
Abstract Purpose Revolutionary changes have taken place to nurses' roles and clinical responsibilities over the past decade, leading to new ways of working and higher levels of nursing practice. However, despite the development of nurse-led clinics and services within oncology there has been little formal evaluation. Methods A survey of 103 UK oncology specialist nurses was undertaken to explore their scope of practice, with emphasis on nurse-led services. Results The survey highlighted signific...
Published on Feb 1, 2010in European Journal of Oncology Nursing1.70
Paul Trevatt1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Royal London Hospital),
Alison Leary1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery)
Abstract Introduction At present no detailed data on the specialist cancer nursing workforce across different cancer types and populations is routinely collected in England, Wales or Northern Ireland. This has implications for workforce planning and the future provision of cancer services. Method In an attempt to establish a baseline of the workforce a census was taken. Data was collected via an Excel spreadsheet by Cancer Network Nurse Directors and Lead Nurses across England and Northern Irela...
Published on Oct 1, 2009in International Journal of Nursing Studies3.57
Emma Ream30
Estimated H-index: 30
('KCL': King's College London),
Jenifer Wilson-Barnett28
Estimated H-index: 28
('KCL': King's College London)
+ 3 AuthorsAlison Richardson45
Estimated H-index: 45
('KCL': King's College London)
Abstract Background Prostate cancer is prevalent worldwide. In England, men living with this malignancy often report unmet psychological, informational, urological and sexual needs. Their experience of care is correspondingly lower than that of other patient groups with cancer. To address this, prostate cancer clinical nurse specialist posts were established across England and Scotland. Their intent was to support men with this form of cancer, enhance symptom management and improve quality of se...
Published on Apr 1, 2006in Journal of Nursing Care Quality1.50
Kevin Armstrong3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Heather K. Spence Laschinger67
Estimated H-index: 67
Nurse managers are seeking ways to improve patient safety in their organizations. At the same time, they struggle to address nurse recruitment and retention concerns by focusing on the quality of nurses' work environment. This exploratory study tested a theoretical model, linking the quality of the
Cited By8
Newest
Published on May 1, 2019in European Journal of Oncology Nursing1.70
Olivia Cook2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Olivia Cook (Monash University, Peninsula campus)+ 1 AuthorsSusan Lee9
Estimated H-index: 9
Abstract Purpose To determine how members of gynaecological oncology multidisciplinary teams experience and perceive the specialist nurse role. Methods Members of gynaecological oncology multidisciplinary teams were recruited via two professional organisations to participate in an online qualitative survey. Survey responses were subjected to an inductive content analysis and categorised according to meaning. Results Sixty-six (n = 66) multidisciplinary team members participated in the online sur...
Published on May 1, 2019in International Journal of Nursing Studies3.57
Geoffrey Punshon3
Estimated H-index: 3
(LSBU: London South Bank University),
Katrina Maclaine1
Estimated H-index: 1
(LSBU: London South Bank University)
+ 3 AuthorsAlison Leary7
Estimated H-index: 7
(LSBU: London South Bank University)
Aims and objectives/background: Nursing is a predominantly female profession. This is reflected in the demographic of nursing around the world. Some authors have noted that despite being a gendered profession men are still advantaged in terms of pay and opportunity. The aim of this study was to examine if the so called glass escalator in which men are advantaged in female professionals still exists. Design and method: Descriptive statistics of the routinely collected national workforce datasets ...
Is the Lymphoedema Genitourinary Cancer Questionnaire (LGUCQ) useful to men treated for genitourinary cancer through facilitating symptom disclosure? Lymphoedema can be debilitating and progressive and its association with bladder, prostate, testicular and penile cancer, either as a consequence of treatment or progressive disease is well recognized. However, lymphoedema is generally unrecognized during follow‐up. Research on genitourinary cancer‐related lymphoedema is sparse with a lack of relia...
Published on Jul 30, 2018in Journal of Crohns & Colitis7.83
Alison Leary7
Estimated H-index: 7
(LSBU: London South Bank University),
I Mason3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Royal Free Hospital),
Geoffrey Punshon3
Estimated H-index: 3
(LSBU: London South Bank University)
Background and Aims Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are the most common forms of inflammatory bowel disease affecting 1 in 250 of the population in the UK. It is accepted that access to a specialist nurse service improves patient experience and outcome. National Standards for inflammatory bowel disease care (2013) defined the number of nurse specialists required at 1.5 full time equivalent per 250,000 population. The aim of this study was to determine if these standards were being met and...
Sean Diver1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
G Avalos19
Estimated H-index: 19
(National University of Ireland, Galway)
+ 1 AuthorsMaura Dowling17
Estimated H-index: 17
(National University of Ireland, Galway)
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Journal of Clinical Nursing1.76
Alison Leary7
Estimated H-index: 7
(LSBU: London South Bank University),
Katrina Maclaine1
Estimated H-index: 1
(LSBU: London South Bank University)
+ 2 AuthorsGeoffrey Punshon3
Estimated H-index: 3
(LSBU: London South Bank University)
Aims and objectives/background The work of specialist nursing has been under scrutiny for many years in the UK due to a perception that it is not cost-effective. A common issue is the lack of consistency of job titles, which causes confusion to the public, employing organisations, colleagues and commissioners of services. Lack of consistency has implications for the wider perception of advanced specialist practice in the worldwide community and the workforce more generally. This study aims to un...
Published on Aug 1, 2017in European Journal of Oncology Nursing1.70
Alastair D. Lamb12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Sue Thompson (Peterborough City Hospital)+ 25 AuthorsNaomi Wright
Thank you to The Urology Foundation (#REPRO15) (Small Project Award 2015) for their support in funding the consensus meeting.
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Clinical Nurse Specialist0.77
Geoffrey Punshon3
Estimated H-index: 3
(LSBU: London South Bank University),
Ruth Endacott30
Estimated H-index: 30
+ 8 AuthorsPaul Trevatt4
Estimated H-index: 4
(LSBU: London South Bank University)
This article is freely available via Open Access, please click on the Additional Link above to access the full text from the publisher's site.