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Children and Disasters: Understanding Vulnerability, Developing Capacities, and Promoting Resilience - An Introduction

Published on Jan 1, 2008in Children, Youth and Environments
Lori Peek18
Estimated H-index: 18
Abstract
This comprehensive overview of the literature on children and disasters argues that scholars and practitioners should more carefully consider the experiences of children themselves. As the frequency and intensity of disaster events increase around the globe, children are among those most at risk for the negative effects of disaster. Children are psychologically vulnerable and may develop post-traumatic stress disorder or related symptoms; are physically vulnerable to death, injury, illness, and abuse; and often experience disruptions or delays in their educational progress as a result of disasters. Children have special needs and may require different forms of physical, social, mental, and emotional support than adults. However, children also have the capacity to contribute to disaster preparedness, response, and recovery activities. In order to promote children’s resilience to disasters, we must improve their access to resources, empower them by encouraging their participation, offer support, and ensure equitable treatment.
  • References (60)
  • Citations (139)
References60
Newest
Published on Sep 20, 2010in Disasters1.80
J.P.W. Rivers1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Lond: University of London)
Little attention has been given to differential survival between the sexes in disasters. Discussions concerned with victimization in natural disasters have focused primarily in terms of class. In this article an analysis of victimization in terms of sex and the sporadic evidence for the marked differential in morbidity and mortality of the two sexes found in many disaster situations is presented. Disaster victims are presented as event victims (those killed or injured by a catastrophe) and conte...
Published on Jan 1, 2008in Children, Youth and Environments
Ted Mitchell1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Katharine Haynes19
Estimated H-index: 19
+ 2 AuthorsKatie Oven9
Estimated H-index: 9
Disaster management is dominated by top-down relief efforts that assume children and youth are passive victims with no role in communicating risks or preventing and responding to disasters. This article challenges these assumptions and critically assesses prevailing theoretical models of risk communication using two case studies that highlight the unique needs and potential roles of children and youth as resources or receivers of disaster management information. These studies in El Salvador and ...
Published on Jan 1, 2008
Bernard Manyena6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Maureen Fordham12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Andrew Collins12
Estimated H-index: 12
The growing recognition of the vulnerability of children to disasters has added a new impetus to the concept of their involvement in disaster risk reduction programs. Involving children in disaster risk reduction is among those aspects promoted in the Hyogo Framework for Action 2005–2015 to enhance the resilience of disaster-affected communities. This article presents the results from a research study which investigated the involvement of children in disaster risk reduction programs in Binga Dis...
Published on Jan 1, 2008
Marisa O. Ensor6
Estimated H-index: 6
This paper explores the experiences of Honduran migrant children in New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Some had migrated to this city after Hurricane Mitch devastated their already poverty-stricken country in 1998, but many of them were forced to relocate again after Katrina. Many others have only recently arrived in New Orleans to join relatives attracted by the construction boom that followed the disaster. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Honduras and New Orleans, I examine t...
Published on Jan 1, 2008in Children, Youth and Environments
Kevin R. Ronan26
Estimated H-index: 26
,
Kylie Crellin4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 3 AuthorsJulia Becker17
Estimated H-index: 17
This paper combines the findings of research aimed at assisting children, youth, and families to more effectively cope with the effects of disasters with a review of the relevant literature. We briefly review the effects of disasters on children, summarizing theory and research on risk and protective factors, interventions following a hazardous event, and promoting children’s resilience. We also look at the role of preventive interventions in assisting children and their families to prepare both...
Published on Jan 1, 2008in Children, Youth and Environments
Inka Weissbecker14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Sandra E. Sephton33
Estimated H-index: 33
+ 1 AuthorsDavid Simpson85
Estimated H-index: 85
Disasters have increased in incidence worldwide and children are especially vulnerable to their effects. Childhood is a unique period during which physical, mental and social development and growth take place. Psychological damage at th stage can affect children for years to come. To outline the psychological and physiological impacts of disaster on children and shed light on possible interventions, the authors reviewed the empirical literature utilizing search databases such as PsychInfo as wel...
Published on Jan 1, 2008
Sammy Zahran26
Estimated H-index: 26
,
Lori Peek18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Samuel D. Brody31
Estimated H-index: 31
This research note examines children’s mortality resulting from forces of nature, including heat exposure, cold exposure, storms and flooding, lightning strikes, avalanches, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions. Data indicate that in the United States, children’s risk of death resulting from natural disasters is relatively low. However, differential risks exist depending on the type of hazard agent involved and between youth populations based on age, gender, and race. Specifically, analyses of mo...
Published on Jan 1, 2008in Children, Youth and Environments
A Westbrook Lauten1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
K Lietz1
Estimated H-index: 1
Through work with disaster-affected children throughout the world, the humanitarian community has incorporated child protection as an essential element of a country’s first response to crisis. Three principles have emerged. First, responders must be guided by a commitment to both assistance and protection of children. Second, child protection efforts should reflect the principle of family unity. Finally, response and reconstruction must be guided by the continuity principle. This principle focus...
Published on Jan 1, 2008
Sara Gill1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Lindsey Gulsvig1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Lori Peek18
Estimated H-index: 18
Published on Jan 1, 2008
Lori Peek18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Jeannette Sutton17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Judy Gump1
Estimated H-index: 1
This article extends the discussion of social support for child disaster survivors by providing a case study overview of the primary organization in the United States responsible for caring for young children in the aftermath of natural and humanmade disasters: Children’s Disaster Services (CDS), which is part of the Brethren Disaster Ministries of the Church of the Brethren General Board. We offer an overview of the history and purpose of the CDS program, describe the training and mobilization ...
Cited By139
Newest
Yi Qiang10
Estimated H-index: 10
(U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa)
Abstract This study provides a nationwide spatial assessment of flood exposure of critical infrastructures (CI) in the United States. By combining the FEMA flood maps and the USGS National Structure Database, the exposure of CI facilities to 100-year-flood was estimated for the country and states. Spatial analyses and statistical tests were conducted to analyze variations of flood exposure of the CIs in different states, counties, sectors and categories. At the national level, the ratios of CI f...
Published on Jun 24, 2019in Disasters1.80
Timothy J. Haney5
Estimated H-index: 5
(MRU: Mount Royal University),
Daran Gray-Scholz (MRU: Mount Royal University)
Published on Jan 24, 2019in Child Development5.02
Lisa Gibbs25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Melbourne),
Jane Nursey2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Melbourne)
+ 8 AuthorsRobyn Molyneaux1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Melbourne)
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Education and Urban Society0.97
Hoda Baytiyeh8
Estimated H-index: 8
(AUB: American University of Beirut)
From pre-disaster to recovery, education is a fundamental key in reducing the impacts of disasters on children, people, and communities. This article aims to highlight the key components that are necessary for building school resilience to earthquakes and to demonstrate that promotion of the seismic resilience of schools is not only critical for children’s safety and the continuity of their education but also for the effective post-earthquake recovery of communities. It is shown that promoting s...
Published on May 1, 2019in Violence Against Women1.64
Mieko Yoshihama21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UM: University of Michigan),
Tomoko Yunomae1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsReiko Masai1
Estimated H-index: 1
This study reports on 82 unduplicated cases of violence against women and children after the Great East Japan Disaster of March 2011. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire from informants who worked with the disaster-affected populations. In addition to domestic violence, reported cases involved sexual assault and unwanted sexual contact, including quid pro quo assault perpetrated by nonintimates. Perpetrators often exploited a sense of fear, helplessness, and powerlessness and us...
Kerrie Proulx (Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute), Frances E. Aboud36
Estimated H-index: 36
(McGill University)
Research on disaster risk reduction (DDR) initiatives for preschool-aged children is lacking and the potential contribution of young children (e.g. under 6 years old) to reducing the risks and impacts of natural disasters has been largely overlooked in DRR programming. Using a quasi-experimental evaluation design, this study examines the short-term effects of a preschool-based DRR program in rural Indonesia on children’s early learning and the quality of preschool settings. The randomly selected...
Elizabeth A. Newnham16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Harvard University),
Jessica Tearne (Curtin University)+ 6 AuthorsJennifer Leaning21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Harvard University)
Abstract There is great potential for adolescents to play an active role in disaster response. Yet a dearth of evidence limits efforts to provide age-appropriate services and roles after emergencies. Sixty-nine adolescents (51% female, ages 13–19) and 72 adults (47% female, ages 22–66) participated in key informant interviews and focus group discussions in disaster-affected areas of China and Nepal. Using inductive content analysis, several themes were identified as key to adolescents’ needs pri...
Published on Dec 3, 2018in European Journal of Psychotraumatology
Betty Pfefferbaum38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center),
Rose L. Pfefferbaum14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Community College of Philadelphia)
+ 0 AuthorsRichard L. Van Horn1
Estimated H-index: 1
(OU: University of Oklahoma)
ABSTRACTBackground: Millions of children are affected by disasters every year. Children need not be passive victims, however, but instead may contribute to disaster risk reduction activities.Objective: This paper provides a theoretical foundation for children’s involvement in disaster risk reduction activities.Method: The paper reviews and analyses the literature on children’s participation, on their developmental capacity to participate, and on disaster risk reduction activities involving child...
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