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Influence of short stature on the change in pulse pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure from age 36 to 53 years: an analysis using multilevel models

Published on Aug 1, 2005in International Journal of Epidemiology7.34
· DOI :10.1093/ije/dyi071
Claudia Langenberg81
Estimated H-index: 81
(UCL: University College London),
Rebecca Hardy71
Estimated H-index: 71
+ 2 AuthorsMichael Wadsworth55
Estimated H-index: 55
Cite
Abstract
Background Previous cross-sectional analyses of this cohort have shown that short height and leg length are associated with higher pulse pressure and systolic blood pressure in middle age. It is unclear how these adult measures of childhood growth influence the change in blood pressure as it increases with age. Methods Multilevel models were fitted to investigate associations between components of height and the change in blood pressure between 36, 43, and 53 years in a prospective national cohort of 1472 men and 1563 women followed-up since birth in 1946. Results Shorter height and leg length, but not trunk length, were associated with higher blood pressure, similarly in men and women. Longitudinal analyses showed that the effects of both height and leg length on pulse pressure and systolic blood pressure became significantly stronger with age. For example, the change in systolic blood pressure was found to be � 0.021 mm Hg (95% confidence interval � 0.029 to � 0.013) per year lower for every centimetre increase in leg length (P � 0.001). In other words, the increase in systolic blood pressure over a 10 year period of a participant whose legs were 10 centimetres shorter was 2.1 mm Hg higher (P � 0.001), compared with a taller participant. Associations were independent of a number of potential confounders. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that short people may be more susceptible to the effects of ageing on the arterial tree. Childhood growth may contribute to the tracking of cardiovascular risk throughout life.
  • References (36)
  • Citations (35)
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References36
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2015
Jon Rasbash31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Fiona Steele27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UoB: University of Bristol)
+ 2 AuthorsIan Lang1
Estimated H-index: 1
All statistical modelling was carried out using MLwiN v.2.22 (24). Likelihood Rasbash J, Steele F, Browne WJ, Goldstein H. A User's Guide to MLwiN, v2.10. A User's Guide to MLwiN. Version 2.26 by Jon Rasbash, Fiona Steele. William J. Browne & Harvey Goldstein. Centre for Multilevel Modelling. University. The multilevel analysis was performed with the computer program MlwiN, all other analyses were performed using A User's Guide to MLwiN Version 1.0.
Published on Jan 21, 2008in Acta Paediatrica2.27
Kim F. Michaelsen74
Estimated H-index: 74
,
Pia Sauer Larsen1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsGösta Samuelson29
Estimated H-index: 29
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
Michaelsen KF, Larsen PS, Thomsen BL, Samuelson G. The Copenhagen cohort study on infant nutrition and growth: duration of breast feeding and influencing factors. Acta Paediatr 1994;83:565–71. Stockholm. ISSN 0803–5253 Duration of breast feeding was studied in 249 randomly chosen, healthy, term infants of Danish origin of which 80.7% participated. Breast feeding was initiated by 99.5% of the mothers. At 3, 6 and 9 months, 71%, 52% and 33%, respectively, were still breast feeding. Only 1 infant (...
Published on May 7, 2005in The Lancet59.10
Rebecca Hardy71
Estimated H-index: 71
,
D Kuh2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 1 AuthorsMej Wadsworth7
Estimated H-index: 7
Published on Jan 1, 2005
GillJeff22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UF: University of Florida)
Published on Jul 1, 2004in Heart5.08
Debbie A. Lawlor112
Estimated H-index: 112
,
Mark Taylor17
Estimated H-index: 17
+ 2 AuthorsShanil Ebrahim35
Estimated H-index: 35
Objective: To assess the associations between components of adult height and coronary heart disease (CHD) in postmenopausal women. Methods: Cross sectional analysis of 4286 women randomly selected from 23 British towns. The association of components of adult height with prevalent CHD (n = 694) were assessed. Results: Shorter stature, shorter leg length, and trunk length were all associated with CHD in age adjusted analyses. The association between trunk length and CHD was attenuated to the null ...
Published on Dec 1, 2003in Social Science & Medicine3.09
Mej Wadsworth7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Medical Research Council),
S.L Butterworth2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Medical Research Council)
+ 5 AuthorsM Connor2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Medical Research Council)
Although the life course prospective study design has many benefits, and information from such studies is in increasing demand for scientific and policy purposes, it has potential inherent design problems associated with its longevity. These are in particular the fixed sample structure and the data collected in early life, which are each determined by the scientific principles of another time and the risk over time of increased sample loss and distortion through loss. The example of a national b...
Published on Oct 1, 2003in The Lancet59.10
Rebecca Hardy71
Estimated H-index: 71
(Medical Research Council),
Diana Kuh79
Estimated H-index: 79
(Medical Research Council)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael Wadsworth8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Medical Research Council)
Summary Background The negative effect of birthweight on systolic blood pressure has been suggested to be initiated in utero and amplified with age. We aimed to investigate this hypothesis. Methods A sample of 3634 people from a birth cohort study of men and women born in Britain in 1946 were included in analyses. Cohort members have been contacted regularly since birth, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured at ages 36, 43, and 53 years. Multilevel models, with blood pressure ...
Published on Sep 1, 2003in American Journal of Epidemiology4.47
Yun-Mi Song32
Estimated H-index: 32
,
George Davey-Smith177
Estimated H-index: 177
,
Joohon Sung30
Estimated H-index: 30
To examine the relation of adult height with mortality, the authors conducted a cohort study of 386,627 middle-aged South Korean male civil servants from 1992 to 1998. An inverse association between height and all-cause mortality (14,003 deaths) was observed after adjustment for socioeconomic position and major behavioral risk factors. The adjusted relative risk for all-cause mortality associated with a 5-cm increment in height was 0.97 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 0.98). There was little evi...
Published on Mar 1, 2003in Journal of Hypertension4.25
Claudia Langenberg81
Estimated H-index: 81
,
Rebecca Hardy71
Estimated H-index: 71
+ 1 AuthorsMichael Wadsworth55
Estimated H-index: 55
Objective To compare the effects of height, leg and trunk length on pulse pressure (PP), systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in men and women.Design Prospective, population-based, birth cohort study.Setting England, Scotland and Wales.Participants A total of 1472 men and 1563 women aged 53 years and followed since their birth in 1946.Main outcome measures PP, SBP and DBP at age 53 years.Results PP increased linearly with decreasing height and leg length in men and women [shortest c...
Cited By35
Newest
Published on May 3, 2019in Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine1.57
Terence T. Lao34
Estimated H-index: 34
,
Annie S.Y. Hui3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 1 AuthorsTak Yeung Leung41
Estimated H-index: 41
AbstractPurpose: The relationship between maternal height and gestational hypertensive disorders was examined in a cohort of Chinese gravidae managed in 1997–2013 to clarify the association between short stature with preeclampsia (PE) and gestational hypertension (GH).Materials and methods: Retrospective study of 87 290 gravidae categorized by their height into four quartile groups. The impact of short stature, defined as height in the lowest quartile, on incidence of PE and GH was studied in re...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Medicine1.87
Brianna Bourgeois3
Estimated H-index: 3
(LSU: Louisiana State University),
Krista Watts1
Estimated H-index: 1
(USMA: United States Military Academy)
+ 5 AuthorsSteven B. Heymsfield62
Estimated H-index: 62
(LSU: Louisiana State University)
Published on Apr 3, 2017in Annals of Human Biology1.59
Santiago Rodríguez López7
Estimated H-index: 7
(CONICET: National Scientific and Technical Research Council),
Isabela M. Benseñor47
Estimated H-index: 47
(USP: University of São Paulo)
+ 2 AuthorsPaulo A. Lotufo56
Estimated H-index: 56
(USP: University of São Paulo)
AbstractBackground: Maternal education influences skeletal growth and offspring adult blood pressure (BP). Height components are negatively associated with BP in high-income countries.Aim: To evaluate the association between maternal education and offspring adult systolic and diastolic BP (SBP/DBP), assessing whether different height components might mediate such an association.Subjects and methods: Simple mediation modelling was used to evaluate the maternal education-offspring SBP/DBP associat...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Journal of Reproduction and Development1.50
Joon Hyouk Choi2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Jeju National University),
Jinseok Kim9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Jeju National University)
Published on Dec 1, 2016in BMC Cardiovascular Disorders1.95
Kevin Y. Taing1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U of T: University of Toronto),
Michael E. Farkouh48
Estimated H-index: 48
(U of T: University of Toronto)
+ 2 AuthorsPrabhat Jha50
Estimated H-index: 50
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Background A determinant of blood pressure is adiposity; however, there are uncertainties surrounding whether general or central adiposity is the more important determinant of blood pressure. Further, inconsistent results exist for the relationships of anthropometric measures with blood pressure and hypertension, and whether these relationships differ substantially by age and sex is unclear. We aimed to elucidate the associations of anthropometric measures of general and central adiposity with b...
Published on Jan 1, 2016
Jonathan C. K. Wells60
Estimated H-index: 60
A multidisciplinary analysis of the role of nutrition in generating hierarchical societies and cultivating a global epidemic of chronic diseases.
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Future Cardiology
Rebecca Hardy71
Estimated H-index: 71
(UCL: University College London),
Debbie A. Lawlor112
Estimated H-index: 112
,
Diana Kuh79
Estimated H-index: 79
ABSTRACT A life course approach in epidemiology investigates the biological, behavioral and social pathways that link physical and social exposures and experiences during gestation, childhood, adolescence and adult life, and across generations, to later-life health and disease risk. We illustrate how a life course approach has been applied to cardiovascular disease, highlighting the evidence in support of the early origins of disease risk. We summarize how trajectories of cardiometabolic risk fa...
Published on Aug 1, 2014in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism5.61
Thang S. Han38
Estimated H-index: 38
(National Health Service),
Gerard S. Conway57
Estimated H-index: 57
(UCL: University College London)
+ 6 AuthorsR. J. M. Ross49
Estimated H-index: 49
(University of Sheffield)
Context: Treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) in childhood focuses on growth and development and adult final height (FH) is a measure of effective treatment. We hypothesized that shorter adults will have more severe underlying disease and worse health outcomes. Methods: This was a cross-sectional analysis of 199 adults with CAH. FH and quality of life were expressed as z-scores adjusted for midparental target height or UK population height. Results: FH correlated inversely with age ...
Published on Feb 1, 2014in International Journal of Epidemiology7.34
Nolwenn Regnault8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UM: University of Miami),
Ken Kleinman73
Estimated H-index: 73
(UM: University of Miami)
+ 3 AuthorsMatthew W. Gillman102
Estimated H-index: 102
(UM: University of Miami)
Background In children being taller is associated with higher blood pressure (BP), but few studies have divided height into its components: trunk and leg length. We examined the associations of total height, trunk length and leg length with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP) and pulse pressure (PP) at early childhood and mid-childhood visits, as well as change between the two visits. Methods We obtained five measures of SBP and DBP at the early childhood visit (N = 1153, follow-up rate = 54%)...