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Spillover of Interpersonal Conflicts From Work into Nonwork: A Daily Diary Study

Published on Jul 1, 2015in Journal of Occupational Health Psychology5.13
· DOI :10.1037/a0038661
Inés Martínez-Corts3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Evangelia Demerouti60
Estimated H-index: 60
+ 1 AuthorsMarina Boz3
Estimated H-index: 3
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Abstract
This study among a heterogeneous sample of employees expands the Job-Demands (JD-R) theory by examining how interpersonal conflicts at work–task and relationship conflict–spillover into the nonwork domain on a daily basis. We hypothesized that daily personal resources can buffer the daily negative spillover of interpersonal conflicts from work into the nonwork domain. A total of 113 employees (n 565 occasions) filled in a daily diary questionnaire in the evening before bedtime over 5 consecutive working days. Results of multilevel analysis showed that the presence of daily personal resources is essential to buffer the spillover of interpersonal conflict at work to the nonwork domain. Specifically, on days that employees were not very optimistic or resilient, interpersonal conflicts resulted in higher strain-based work–life conflict experiences. These findings contribute to the JD-R theory and show how the unfavorable effects of daily interpersonal conflicts in the work domain may be avoided in the nonwork domain through enhancing personal resources. We discuss the implications for theory and practice.
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  • References (84)
  • Citations (17)
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References84
Newest
Evangelia Demerouti60
Estimated H-index: 60
(TU/e: Eindhoven University of Technology),
Sonja Rispens11
Estimated H-index: 11
(TU/e: Eindhoven University of Technology)
This commentary argues that the quality and usefulness of student-recruited data can be evaluated by examining the external validity and generalization issues related to this sampling method. Therefore, we discuss how the sampling methods of student- and non-student-recruited samples can enhance or diminish external validity and generalization. Next, we present the advantages of the student-recruited sampling method (heterogeneity of the sample, student learning, cost reduction, and elaborate re...
Published on Feb 11, 2014
Arnold B. Bakker97
Estimated H-index: 97
(Lingnan University),
Evangelia Demerouti60
Estimated H-index: 60
(TU/e: Eindhoven University of Technology)
This chapter outlines the building blocks of the job demands–resources (JD-R) theory, a theory that has been inspired by job design and job stress theories. Whereas job design theories have often ignored the role of job stressors or demands, job stress models have largely ignored the motivating potential of job resources. JD-R theory combines the two research traditions, and explains how job demands and (job and personal) resources have unique and multiplicative effects on job stress and motivat...
Published on Dec 1, 2013in Journal of Vocational Behavior3.39
Arnold B. Bakker97
Estimated H-index: 97
(Lingnan University),
Ana Isabel Sanz-Vergel14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid)
Abstract Two studies were conducted to examine how home healthcare nurses stay engaged in their work and maintain their psychological well-being. In Study 1, we hypothesized that nurses would perceive work pressure more as a hindrance demand than as a challenge demand, and that the reverse would be true for emotional demands. We approached 120 home healthcare nurses who filled in a survey. Results of a series of paired sample t-tests supported our hypotheses. In Study 2, we used the JD-R model t...
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Journal of Personnel Psychology1.05
Matthew J. W. McLarnon9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Mitchell G. Rothstein19
Estimated H-index: 19
This study sought to provide the initial psychometric evidence supporting a new measure of resiliency. In consideration of the shortcomings of previous measures, a more comprehensive measure was developed based on the theoretical model of King and Rothstein (2010). The resulting measure, the Workplace Resilience Inventory (WRI), encompasses an individual’s personal characteristics, social support network, initial responses to a significant and life changing event, and self-regulatory processes. ...
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Journal of Occupational Health Psychology5.13
Laurenz L. Meier27
Estimated H-index: 27
(USF: University of South Florida),
Sven Gross5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Bern)
+ 1 AuthorsNorbert K. Semmer41
Estimated H-index: 41
(University of Bern)
Our research examined short-term within-person effects of relationship and task conflict on angry mood and somatic complaints. We assumed that conflicts of both kinds would be prospectively related to both indicators of impaired well-being, that the effect of relationship conflict would be stronger than the effect of task conflict, and that the effect of relationship conflict would be stronger when task conflict is low than when it is high. We tested our hypotheses with a daily diary study with ...
Published on Jan 1, 2013
Kim van Erp4
Estimated H-index: 4
(TU/e: Eindhoven University of Technology),
Josette Gevers7
Estimated H-index: 7
(TU/e: Eindhoven University of Technology)
+ 1 AuthorsEvangelia Demerouti60
Estimated H-index: 60
(TU/e: Eindhoven University of Technology)
Werknemers in de dienst- en hulpverlenend e sector krijgen vaak te maken met omstanders die hen in hun werkzaamheden belemmeren. In de wetenschappelijke literatuur is het specifieke fenomeen omstanderconflict echter nog onderbelicht. In dit artikel positioneren we omstanderconf lict in de bestaande conflictliteratuur. Door literatuur op het gebied van conflict, interrupties, en agressie op de werkvloer te integreren, ontstaat een categorisering waaruit verschillende typen omstanderconflict naar ...
Published on Sep 14, 2012in Career Development International1.56
Jack K. Ito9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Regina),
Céleste M. Brotheridge20
Estimated H-index: 20
Purpose – This article seeks to apply the challenge–hindrance conceptualization of demands to a model that relates stressors to emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction. Supervisory support, a resource, is posited as a precursor to demands, and work–family conflict (WFC) and interpersonal conflict (IPC) at work are expected to mediate the demand–strain and job satisfaction relationships.Design/methodology/approach – This cross‐sectional self‐report survey included a sample of 600 government emp...
Despoina Xanthopoulou21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UoC: University of Crete),
Arnold B. Bakker97
Estimated H-index: 97
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)
+ 1 AuthorsWilmar B. Schaufeli103
Estimated H-index: 103
(UU: Utrecht University)
This diary study tests the broaden-and-build theory in the work context and expands it by examining job resources as potential antecedents of positive emotions on a daily basis. We hypothesized that general perceptions of job resources (autonomy, supervisory coaching, and the psychological climate of cooperation and warmth) relate indirectly to employees' daily personal resources (self-efficacy, self-esteem, and optimism) through daily manifestations of the job resources and daily positive emoti...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
Paraskevas Petrou10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UU: Utrecht University),
Evangelia Demerouti60
Estimated H-index: 60
(TU/e: Eindhoven University of Technology)
+ 2 AuthorsJørn Hetland28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Bergen)
Summary This study focused on daily job crafting and explored its contextual determinants and one motivational outcome (i.e., work engagement). Job crafting was conceptualized as “seeking resources, ”“ seeking challenges,” and “reducing demands.” Participants were 95 employees from several organizations who completed a 5-day diary survey. As hypothesized, we found a 3-factor structure for the job crafting instrument, both at the general and day levels. We hypothesized and found that the combinat...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
Frank de Wit6
Estimated H-index: 6
(LEI: Leiden University),
Lindred L. Greer22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UvA: University of Amsterdam),
Karen A. Jehn38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Melbourne Business School)
Since the meta-analysis by De Dreu and Weingart (2003a) on the effects of intragroup conflict on group outcomes, more than 70 new empirical studies of conflict have been conducted, often investigating more complex, moderated relationships between conflict and group outcomes, as well as new types of intragroup conflict, such as process conflict. To explore the trends in this new body of literature, we conducted a meta-analysis of 116 empirical studies of intragroup conflict (n = 8870 groups) and ...
Cited By17
Newest
Published on Aug 23, 2018in Applied Psychology3.27
David M. Fisher6
Estimated H-index: 6
(TU: University of Tulsa),
Jennifer M. Ragsdale4
Estimated H-index: 4
(TU: University of Tulsa),
Emily C.S. Fisher1
Estimated H-index: 1
(OU: University of Oklahoma)
Published on Jul 9, 2019in Current Psychology1.47
Yuanbo Gu (SNNU: Shaanxi Normal University), Ruimei Wang
Drawing on the job demands-resources model and effort-recovery model, this two-wave study among preschool teachers explored whether job demands (i.e., workload and surface acting) increase work–family conflict over time. The authors further predicted that job resources (i.e., supervisor support and the perceived meaning of work) as well as recovery experiences during after-work hours (i.e., psychological detachment and relaxation) act as buffers and mitigate the detrimental effects of job demand...
Published on Jun 19, 2019in International Journal of Conflict Management1.20
Vijay Kuriakose (CUSAT: Cochin University of Science and Technology), S. Sreejesh6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Indian Institute of Management Kozhikode)
+ 2 AuthorsShelly Jose
Purpose The primary objective of this paper is to extend the Activity Reduces Conflict Associated Strain (ARCAS) model. To test the ARCAS model, the study aims to examine the effect of process conflict on employee well-being and the role of negative affect as an intrapersonal mechanism linking process conflict and employee well-being. Further, to extend the emerging ARCAS model, the study examines whether the assumed indirect effect of process conflict on employee well-being through negative aff...
Published on May 1, 2019in International Journal of Stress Management2.18
Regina Kempen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Osnabrück),
Jens Roewekaemper (University of Osnabrück)+ 1 AuthorsKarsten Mueller5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Osnabrück)
Published on Apr 4, 2019in Applied Psychology3.27
Silja Hartmann1
Estimated H-index: 1
(LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich),
Matthias Weiss5
Estimated H-index: 5
(RUB: Ruhr University Bochum)
+ 1 AuthorsMartin Hoegl34
Estimated H-index: 34
(LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)
Øystein Løvik Hoprekstad (University of Bergen), Jørn Hetland28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Bergen)
+ 4 AuthorsStåle Einarsen51
Estimated H-index: 51
(University of Bergen)
ABSTRACTThe aim of the present study was to examine the relationships between daily exposure to negative acts and depressed mood on the same day and on the days following the exposure, and to test the hypothesis that these relationships would be stronger among those who have recently gone through a process of victimization from workplace bullying. The sample comprised 110 naval cadets participating in two different eleven-week tall ship voyages from Northern Europe to North America. Victimizatio...
Published on Jan 1, 2019
Johnna Capitano1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Kristie L. McAlpine , Jeffrey H. Greenhaus49
Estimated H-index: 49
Abstract A core concept of work–home interface research is boundary permeability – the frequency with which elements from one domain cross, or permeate, the boundary of another domain. Yet, there remains ambiguity as to what these elements are and how these permeations impact important outcomes such as role satisfaction and role performance. The authors introduce a multidimensional perspective of work–home boundary permeability, identifying five forms of boundary permeation: task, psychological,...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Journal of Vocational Behavior3.39
Franziska Baumeler2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Bern),
Claire S. Johnston7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Bern)
+ 1 AuthorsDaniel Spurk7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Bern)
Abstract A positive work–nonwork interface is an important aspect of successful career development because it is associated with satisfaction, positive health, and positive work outcomes. However, the role of proactive behaviors at work for work–nonwork enrichment mechanisms has thus far not received much attention. Based on the conservation of resource theory (Hobfoll, 1989) and work–family enrichment theory (Greenhaus & Powell, 2006), we investigated the instrumental (i.e., coworker support) a...
Published on Oct 23, 2018in Applied Psychology3.27
Lilian Gombert (Technical University of Dortmund), Wladislaw Rivkin5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Aston University),
Klaus-Helmut Schmidt23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Technical University of Dortmund)
View next paperThe thin line between work and home: The spillover and crossover of daily conflicts