Match!

The determinants of driving aggression among Polish drivers

Published on Nov 1, 2014in Transportation Research Part F-traffic Psychology and Behaviour
· DOI :10.1016/j.trf.2014.09.007
Aneta Przepiorka14
Estimated H-index: 14
(KUL: John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin),
Agata Błachnio13
Estimated H-index: 13
(KUL: John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin),
David L. Wiesenthal15
Estimated H-index: 15
(York University)
Sources
Abstract
Abstract The present study examined the relationships between narcissism, self-esteem, driving anger, and driving aggression in an Internet survey of 334 Polish drivers using the Polish versions of the Driving Anger Scale (DAS), the Driving Vengeance Questionnaire (DVQ), Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale, the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI), and the Driving Behavior Survey (DBS). High levels of narcissism and low self-esteem predicted driving aggression. Implications for improving road safety are discussed. We compare the findings with the most recent results from North America.
  • References (77)
  • Citations (10)
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
418 Citations
364 Citations
78% of Scinapse members use related papers. After signing in, all features are FREE.
References77
Newest
#1Avi BesserH-Index: 37
#2Virgil Zeigler-HillH-Index: 15
Last. Yuval NeriaH-Index: 38
view all 4 authors...
Objective: Diathesis-stress models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) hypothesize that exposure to trauma may interact with individual differences in the development of PTSD. Previous studies have not assessed immediate responses to a proximate stressor, but the current “natural laboratory” study was designed to empirically test the role that individual differences in pathological narcissism may play in the development of acute anxiety symptoms among civilians facing rocket and missile fire...
14 CitationsSource
#1Agata Błachnio (KUL: John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin)H-Index: 13
#2Aneta Przepiorka (KUL: John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin)H-Index: 14
Last. Mark J.M. Sullman (KUL: John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
1 Citations
#1Bryan D. Edwards (OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater)H-Index: 18
#2Christopher R. Warren (LBSU: California State University, Long Beach)H-Index: 7
Last. Rebecca Hoffner-Prillaman (VT: Virginia Tech)H-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
The present study examined narcissism and driving anger as explanations of aggressive driving behavior in young adults. Using a sample of 362 young adult drivers, we found that narcissism and driving anger were significant predictors of aggressive driving. Although driving anger was a stronger predictor of aggressive driving, narcissism was uniquely related to aggressive driving above and beyond driving anger. In addition, aggressive driving was a significant predictor of crashes and moving viol...
23 CitationsSource
#1Kevin L. Blankenship (Iowa State University)H-Index: 11
#2Sundé M. Nesbit (UNI: University of Northern Iowa)H-Index: 6
Abstract Stimuli present in aversive situations (even initially neutral stimuli) can become associated with aggressive feelings and thoughts become capable of acting as cues for aggressive thoughts. The present research examined whether driving stimuli can serve as triggers for aggression-related concepts for individuals predisposed to becoming angry while driving (i.e., high in self-reported trait driving anger). Using the General Aggression Model ( Anderson & Bushman, 2002 ) as a guide, two st...
7 CitationsSource
#1Kostas A. Fanti (UCY: University of Cyprus)H-Index: 24
#2Chara A. Demetriou (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
Last. Eva R. Kimonis (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 30
view all 3 authors...
Callous-unemotional traits are believed to be a childhood precursor to psychopathy, and among youth with conduct problems they designate those showing a particularly severe, stable, and aggressive pattern of antisocial behavior. Youth with callous-unemotional traits are a heterogeneous population and, analogous to adults with psychopathy, research suggests that lower anxious primary and high-anxious secondary variants exist. Using a community sample of 2,306 Greek-Cypriot adolescents (M age = 16...
61 CitationsSource
#1A BenerH-Index: 5
#2Elnour E. DafeeahH-Index: 10
Last. Timo Juhani LajunenH-Index: 32
view all 10 authors...
The aim of the present study was to assess drivers' gender and age related differences in the associations between high risk taking behavior and Road Traffic Crashes in Qatar. This is a cross sectional study in which a multistage stratified cluster sampling was performed. Of 2400 drivers aged 20 years and above approached, 1824 drivers agreed to participate in the survey (76%). The study was based on a face to face interview with a designed questionnaire including Driver Behaviour Questionnaire ...
5 Citations
#1Beatriz González-Iglesias (University of Santiago de Compostela)H-Index: 9
#2José Antonio Gómez Fraguela (University of Santiago de Compostela)H-Index: 14
Last. María Ángeles Luengo-Martín (University of Santiago de Compostela)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
In this work, we examined the contribution of anger-related variables to explaining traffic rule violations with control for the effect of variables such as age, gender and annual mileage. Also, we explored gender differences in driving-elicited anger and its forms of expression with provision for exposure in terms of mileage. In addition, we studied male and female driving habits in relation to individual histories of fines and accidents with a view to identifying the role of drivers’ anger in ...
82 CitationsSource
#1Peter Fischer (University of Regensburg)H-Index: 25
#2Joachim I. Krueger (Brown University)H-Index: 35
Last. Evelyn Vingilis (UWO: University of Western Ontario)H-Index: 27
view all 6 authors...
Media contents that glorify risk-taking (e.g., video games that simulate illegal street racing, TV depictions of dangerous extreme sports or stunts) are becoming increasingly popular. Theory and research suggest that risk glorification is associated with risk-taking among the audience. Until recently the evidence was limited in three ways: First, most studies, being correlational, did not permit clear causal inferences. Second, we did not know the strength of the effect of different types of med...
11 CitationsSource
#1Vanessa PiccirilliH-Index: 1
The present study examined the complex relationship between narcissism and perceptions of aggression by conceptualizing these constructs using a path analysis model. High levels of affect intensity and low levels of attributional complexity were identified as potential mediators for the relationship between narcissism and perceptions of aggression. Participants first completed four self-report measures and were primed by writing an essay about a time they felt insulted (v. control). They then an...
1 Citations
#1Christine M. Wickens (York University)H-Index: 15
#2David L. Wiesenthal (York University)H-Index: 15
Last. Gordon L. Flett (York University)H-Index: 65
view all 4 authors...
Two studies tested the applicability of Weiner's (1995, 1996, 2001, 2006) attributional model of social conduct to roadway environments. This model highlights the role of inferences of responsibility after making causal judgments for social transgressions. Study 1 employed written scenarios where participants were asked to imagine themselves driving on a major highway. The degree of controllability and intentionality of the driving act was manipulated experimentally by altering the specific even...
43 CitationsSource
Cited By10
Newest
#1Mark J.M. Sullman (University of Nicosia)H-Index: 22
#2Amanda N. Stephens (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 17
Last. Joanne E. Taylor (Massey University)H-Index: 17
view all 3 authors...
Abstract It is well established that angry and, subsequently, aggressive drivers pose a problem for road safety. Over recent years, there has been an increase in the number of published studies examining driver anger, particularly using the Driving Anger Scale (DAS). The DAS measures six broad types of situations likely to provoke anger while driving (i.e., police presence, illegal driving, discourtesy, traffic obstructions, slower drivers, and hostile gestures). The majority of the recent studi...
1 CitationsSource
#1John P. K. Bernstein (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 3
#2Matthew Calamia (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 7
Abstract Objective A wide variety of driving self-report measures are purported to assess drivers’ behaviors and emotions. However, little is known about the underlying factor structure of these measures. This study examined the factor structure of several self-report measures frequently utilized in the assessment of driving-related behaviors and emotions. Design Cohort survey in a large sample (n = 287) of young adults (mean age = 19.91 years, SD = 1.65). Results Exploratory factor analysis rev...
2 CitationsSource
#1Xinyu Du (Liaoning Normal University)H-Index: 1
#2Yue Shen (Liaoning Normal University)H-Index: 1
Last. Jinfei Ma (Liaoning Normal University)H-Index: 1
view all 4 authors...
Abstract The purpose of this study was to systematically investigate the factors that influence driver aggression by using a combination of attribution theory, planned behavior theory, and general aggression theory. Using the principle of convenience to select our sample size, we asked 308 Chinese drivers from Dalian to fill out a questionnaire. They ranged in age from 21 to 65 years (n = 297). Inspired by the Propensity for Angry Driving Scale (PADS) and the Driving Anger Scale (DAS), we formul...
2 CitationsSource
#1Renan Pereira Monteiro (UFMT: Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso)H-Index: 3
#2Gabriel Lins de Holanda Coelho (Cardiff University)H-Index: 3
Last. Valdiney Veloso Gouveia (UFPB: Federal University of Paraíba)H-Index: 25
view all 5 authors...
Abstract The present study tested the role of various personality traits in explaining dangerous driving and involvement in accidents, using a contextual mediated model (N = 311). We initially found direct effects of personality traits on dangerous driving indicators (Big-5, Dark Triad, sensation seeking, aggression, and impulsivity). Subsequently, personality variables with predictive power were tested in the mediation model. Indirect effects of anger, psychopathy and sensation seeking on the h...
1 CitationsSource
#1Gabriel EscanésH-Index: 1
#2Fernando Martín Poó (CONICET: National Scientific and Technical Research Council)H-Index: 6
Abstract Angry driving is a risk factor for traffic crashes and injuries, however it has been understudied in Latin American countries. The main aim of the present study was to translate and adapt the short form of the Driving Anger Scale (DAS; Deffenbacher et al., 1994 ) to the Argentinean Spanish. We also included further situations linked to bad conditions of the road network in Argentina. The sample of the study included 988 Argentinean drivers from the general population. Exploratory and co...
4 CitationsSource
#1Başar Demir (METU: Middle East Technical University)H-Index: 2
#2Sıla Demir (METU: Middle East Technical University)H-Index: 1
Last. Türker Özkan (METU: Middle East Technical University)H-Index: 21
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Driver anger is an important individual difference variable that has been investigated extensively for understanding driving outcomes. The Driving Anger Expression Inventory (DAX – i.e., physical, verbal, use of vehicle as an aggression tool, and adaptive/constructive practices) and the Driver Behavior Questionnaire (DBQ – i.e., errors, lapses, and violations) are common outcome measures for investigating how people express their anger while driving. The current study aims to conduct a ...
8 CitationsSource
Abstract The aim of this paper was to evaluate the relationship between anger (trait and driving anger) and aggressive driving. In order to test these relationships, we conducted a systematic review of the literature on anger and aggressive driving. We identified 51 eligible studies that we included in this meta-analysis. Based on previous literature, we hypothesised that: (1) there is a positive relationship between anger and aggressive driving; (2) the relationship between anger and aggressive...
16 CitationsSource
#1Maria Eugènia Gras (University of Girona)H-Index: 7
#2Sílvia Font-Mayolas (University of Girona)H-Index: 13
Last. Mark J.M. Sullman (Cranfield University)H-Index: 22
view all 6 authors...
Abstract The main aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between resilience and the expression of driving anger. In addition, the adequacy of a Spanish version of a short form of the Driving Anger Expression inventory (DAX) was assessed, along with the relationships the DAX subscales had with gender, age, licence tenure, fines and crashes. The sample consisted of 2409 Spanish undergraduate students (mean age = 21.60; S.D. = 2.86; 60% women). A Spanish adaption of the Connor–Dav...
4 CitationsSource
Abstract The present study examined the potential relationships between the 7-factor (Raskin & Terry, 1988) and 3-factor (Ackerman et al., 2011) models of narcissism and state driving anger. A total of 205 (113 women and 92 men) participants were recruited from a student population through in-class announcements, on-campus posters, and word of mouth. All participants drove their regular commute and completed a state measure of anger immediately upon arrival at school while in their vehicle. As e...
5 CitationsSource
#1Avi BesserH-Index: 37
#2Virgil Zeigler-HillH-Index: 15
Last. Yuval NeriaH-Index: 38
view all 4 authors...
Objective: Diathesis-stress models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) hypothesize that exposure to trauma may interact with individual differences in the development of PTSD. Previous studies have not assessed immediate responses to a proximate stressor, but the current “natural laboratory” study was designed to empirically test the role that individual differences in pathological narcissism may play in the development of acute anxiety symptoms among civilians facing rocket and missile fire...
14 CitationsSource