Match!

Supervisors' exceedingly difficult goals and abusive supervision: The mediating effects of hindrance stress, anger, and anxiety

Published on Apr 1, 2014in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
· DOI :10.1002/job.1879
Mary B. Mawritz10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Drexel University),
Robert Folger I49
Estimated H-index: 49
(UCF: University of Central Florida),
Gary P. Latham69
Estimated H-index: 69
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Cite
Abstract
Summary This study examined a contextual predictor of abusive supervision. Specifically, we hypothesized that job goals that are judged by supervisors to be exceedingly difficult to attain is a predictor of subordinate-rated abusive supervisory behavior. Drawing on the cognitive theory of stress, we hypothesized that exceedingly difficult job goals assigned to supervisors predict abusive behavior directed at their subordinates, as mediated by the supervisors' hindrance stress and emotions (e.g., anger and anxiety). We collected data from employees and their immediate supervisors to test this theoretical model (N = 215 matched pairs). The results of this multisource field study provided support for the hypothesized relationships. In particular, assigned job goals that were appraised by supervisors as exceedingly difficult to attain predicted their hindrance stress. Also, hindrance stress was positively related to anger and anxiety, which in turn predicted abusive supervision. Theoretically, these findings contribute to research on goal setting, stress, and abusive supervision. In addition, these findings are practically important in that they provide suggestions on how to minimize abusive supervision in organizations. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • References (59)
  • Citations (48)
Cite
References59
Newest
Kevin Daniels32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UEA: University of East Anglia),
Varuni Wimalasiri5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Exeter)
+ 1 AuthorsAlistair Cheyne11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Lboro: Loughborough University)
Affective well-being is influenced by individuals' momentary beliefs concerning events' impact on goals. We examined within-day beliefs concerning problem-solving demands' adverse impact on an important work goal (work performance). Participants (N = 68) provided data up to four times per day for one working week. Hourly beliefs about problem-solving demands' adverse impact on performance were associated with end-of-hour anxious affect and inversely associated with end-of-hour motivated pleasant...
Published on Jun 1, 2012in Personnel Psychology6.93
Mary B. Mawritz10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Drexel University),
David M. Mayer31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UM: University of Michigan)
+ 2 AuthorsSophia V. Marinova13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)
Much of the abusive supervision research has focused on the supervisor– subordinate dyad when examining the effects of abusive supervision on employee outcomes. Using data from a large multisource field study, we extend this research by testing a trickle-down model of abusive supervision across 3 hierarchical levels (i.e., managers, supervisors, and employees). Drawing on social learning theory and social information processing theory, we find general support for the study hypotheses. Specifical...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
Rebecca L. Greenbaum11
Estimated H-index: 11
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater),
Mary B. Mawritz10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Drexel University),
Gabi Eissa4
Estimated H-index: 4
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater)
We propose that an employee's bottom-line mentality may have an important effect on social undermining behavior in organizations. Bottom-line mentality is defined as 1-dimensional thinking that revolves around securing bottom-line outcomes to the neglect of competing priorities. Across a series of studies, we establish an initial nomological network for bottom-line mentality. We also develop and evaluate a 4-item measure of bottom-line mentality. In terms of our theoretical model, we draw on soc...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
Marie S. Mitchell13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Maureen L. Ambrose29
Estimated H-index: 29
This research examines employees' behavioral reactions to perceived supervisor aggression. The goal is to understand what makes employees react constructively or destructively to aggression. Three types of behavioral reactions are investigated: retaliation, coworker displaced aggression, and problem solving. We suggest employee reactions are influenced by individual and situational characteristics. We test these ideas by examining the moderating effects of 1 individual factor (locus of control) ...
David M. Mayer31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UM: University of Michigan),
Stefan Thau15
Estimated H-index: 15
(LBS: London Business School)
+ 2 AuthorsDavid De Cremer51
Estimated H-index: 51
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)
Integrating self-uncertainty management and thwarted needs perspectives on leader mistreatment and workplace deviance, we examine when and why leader mistreatment is associated with workplace deviance. We propose that competence uncertainty strengthens the relationship between leader mistreatment and workplace deviance and that hostility mediates this interactive effect. Four field studies and one experiment support the hypotheses. The first two studies provide evidence for the predicted interac...
Published on Oct 1, 2011in Journal of Vocational Behavior3.39
Jennica R. Webster6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Marquette University),
Terry A. Beehr53
Estimated H-index: 53
(CMU: Central Michigan University),
Kevin G. Love9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CMU: Central Michigan University)
Abstract Interest regarding the challenge-hindrance occupational stress model has increased in recent years, however its theoretical foundation has not been tested. Drawing from the transactional theory of stress, this study tests the assumptions made in past research (1) that workload and responsibility are appraised as challenges and role ambiguity and role conflict are appraised as hindrances, and (2) that these appraisals mediate the relationship between these stressors and outcomes (i.e., s...
Published on Apr 1, 2011in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
M. Sandy Hershcovis13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UM: University of Manitoba)
Research in the field of workplace aggression has rapidly developed in the last two decades, and with this growth has come an abundance of overlapping constructs that fall under the broad rubric of workplace aggression. While researchers have conceptually distinguished these constructs, it is unclear whether this proliferation of constructs is adding appreciably to our knowledge, or whether it is constraining the questions we ask. In this paper, I consider five example constructs (i.e., abusive ...
Published on Jan 1, 2011in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
Simon Lloyd D. Restubog29
Estimated H-index: 29
(ANU: Australian National University),
Kristin L. Scott11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Clemson University),
Thomas J. Zagenczyk20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Clemson University)
We developed a model of the relationships among aggressive norms, abusive supervision, psychological distress, family undermining, and supervisor-directed deviance. We tested the model in 2 studies using multisource data: a 3-wave investigation of 184 full-time employees (Study 1) and a 2-wave investigation of 188 restaurant workers (Study 2). Results revealed that (a) abusive supervision mediated the relationship between aggressive norms and psychological distress, (b) psychological distress me...
Published on Feb 1, 2010in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
Ronald F. Piccolo19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Rollins College),
Rebecca L. Greenbaum11
Estimated H-index: 11
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater)
+ 1 AuthorsRobert Folger I49
Estimated H-index: 49
(College of Business Administration)
Summary In the current study, we draw on the original job characteristics model (JCM) and on an elaborated model of work design to examine relationships between ethical leadership, task significance, job autonomy, effort, and job performance. We suggest that leaders with strong ethical commitments who regularly demonstrate ethically normative behavior can have an impacton the JCM elementsof tasksignificance and autonomy, thereby affecting anemployee’s motivation (willingness to exert effort), wh...
Published on Feb 1, 2010in Journal of Vocational Behavior3.39
Jennica R. Webster2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CMU: Central Michigan University),
Terry A. Beehr53
Estimated H-index: 53
(CMU: Central Michigan University),
Neil D. Christiansen18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CMU: Central Michigan University)
Abstract This study investigated the processes whereby hindrance and challenge stressors may affect work behavior. Three mechanisms were examined to explain the differential effects these stressors have demonstrated: job satisfaction, strains, and work self-efficacy. A model is proposed in which both types of stressors will result in increases in strains, but that job satisfaction is primarily involved in the relationship between hindrance stressors and citizenship behavior, and efficacy is invo...
Cited By48
Newest
Published on 2019in Business Ethics: A European Review2.92
Samson Samwel Shillamkwese (USTC: University of Science and Technology of China), Hussain Tariq1
Estimated H-index: 1
(USTC: University of Science and Technology of China)
+ 2 AuthorsThomas N. Garavan35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Edinburgh Napier University)
Published on Feb 22, 2019in Personnel Psychology6.93
Thomas W. H. Ng40
Estimated H-index: 40
(HKU: University of Hong Kong),
Mo Wang30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UF: University of Florida)
Published on Oct 13, 2017in Journal of Business Ethics3.80
Fu Yang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(SWUFE: Southwestern University of Finance and Economics),
Jun Liu2
Estimated H-index: 2
(RUC: Renmin University of China)
+ 1 AuthorsYucheng Zhang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(HEBUT: Hebei University of Technology)
Past research suggests that spiritual leadership plays a pivotal role in enhancing employee job performance, yet we have little understanding of how and when spiritual leadership enhances employee job performance. The present study explores how and when spiritual leadership promotes job performance by examining relational energy as a mediator and leader integrity and relational energy differentiation as boundary conditions. We tested the theoretical model with data gathered across three phases o...
Dong Ju3
Estimated H-index: 3
(BNU: Beijing Normal University),
Mingpeng Huang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UIBE: Beijing Institute of Foreign Trade)
+ 3 AuthorsChen Chen (SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University)
Abstract While a large number of studies have shown the detrimental effects of abusive supervision on subordinates’ work attitudes and outcomes, little is known about how abusive supervision impacts supervisors themselves. Drawing upon self-perception theory and power-dependence theory, we take a unique actor-focused approach to examine how and when engaging in abusive supervisory behavior may benefit actors (i.e., supervisors). Specifically, we propose that abusive supervisory behavior is posit...
Published on Aug 26, 2019in Human Resource Management2.93
Saima Naseer2
Estimated H-index: 2
(IIUI: International Islamic University, Islamabad),
Magda Donia6
Estimated H-index: 6
(U of O: University of Ottawa)
+ 1 AuthorsFatima Bashir (IIUI: International Islamic University, Islamabad)
Published on Jul 6, 2019in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
Julie M. McCarthy15
Estimated H-index: 15
(U of T: University of Toronto),
Berrin Erdogan24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Exeter),
Talya N. Bauer32
Estimated H-index: 32
(PSU: Portland State University)
Published on Jul 16, 2019in Current Psychology1.47
Salim Khan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(HIT: Harbin Institute of Technology),
Dapeng Liang (HIT: Harbin Institute of Technology)+ 1 AuthorsSyed Jamal Shah1
Estimated H-index: 1
(HIT: Harbin Institute of Technology)
Drawing on moral disengagement theory, this study examined the interplay of perceived market competition threat, fear of failure, moral relativism, and moral disengagement. Perceived competitive threat was proposed to be positively related to moral disengagement, and fear of failure was proposed to mediate the relationship between perceived competitive threat and moral disengagement. Furthermore, moral relativism was anticipated to have a moderating effect on the direct and indirect relationship...
Published on Jan 10, 2019
Edwin A. Locke82
Estimated H-index: 82
,
Gary P. Latham69
Estimated H-index: 69
View next paperConsequences of Abusive Supervision