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New Organizational Forms: Towards a Generative Dialogue:

Published on Dec 1, 2007in Organization Studies3.54
· DOI :10.1177/0170840607079531
Ian Palmer22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney),
Jodie Benveniste3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney),
Richard Dunford14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Macquarie University)
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Abstract
The concept of `new organizational forms' has been with us for over 20 years, but little attention has been given to the diverse assumptions underlying various researchers' use of this term. We identify five areas where different assumptions are in use, underpinned by a variety of theoretical perspectives. We urge scholars to engage in a generative dialogue about new organizational forms across theoretical perspectives. The aim of a generative dialogue is to identify where areas of agreement about new organizational forms can be achieved and where differences can be accepted and respected.
  • References (85)
  • Citations (44)
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References85
Newest
Published on Mar 2, 2017
Gibson Burrell2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Gareth Morgan25
Estimated H-index: 25
Contents: Introduction. Part I In Search of a Framework: Assumptions about the nature of social science Assumptions about the nature of society Two dimensions: four paradigms. Part II The Paradigms Explored: Functionalist sociology Functionalist organisation theory Interpretive sociology The interpretive paradigm and the study of organisations Radical humanism Anti-organisation theory Radical structuralism Radical organisation theory. Part III Conclusions: Future directions: theory and research....
Published on Apr 1, 2007in Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources0.89
Richard Dunford14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Macquarie University),
Ian Palmer22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)
+ 1 AuthorsJohn Crawford17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)
The new organizational forms literature argues that in a dynamic business environment, ‘new’ ways of organizing are required to ensure speed, flexibility and innovation. Originally it was asserted that the ‘new’ organizational practices, after a period of transition, would replace the ‘old’ practices, such as formalization and centralization. An alternative view has emerged recently which argues that ‘old’ and ‘new’ practices are compatible and can co-exist. The focus of this study was to test t...
Published on Mar 1, 2006in Journal of Management Inquiry1.99
Christian De Cock15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Emma Jeanes8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Exeter)
In this essay we put into question the pre-occupation with consensus and convergence that seems to characterize the field of OMT (Organization and Management Theory). Much effort has been directed to providing a model of unification legitimating the political containment of conflictual diversity. Even potentially controversial debates (such as the "Paradigm Wars") have taken on a rather tired quality as academics tend to look for the "middle ground" or are happy to retreat into private language ...
Published on Jan 1, 2006in American Behavioral Scientist1.44
Jesper Strandgaard Pedersen15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Ann Westenholz9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Frank Dobbin37
Estimated H-index: 37
Thirty years ago, new institutional theory challenged the then dominant functionalist explanations of organizational behavior by pointing to the role of meaning in the production and reproduction of organizational practices (Meyer & Rowan, 1977; Meyer & Scott, 1983). But new institutional theory was soon subject to both internal and external criticism for having, among other things, replaced the invisible hand of the market with the invisible hand of culture. In effect, it was difficult for the ...
Published on Dec 1, 2005in International Small Business Journal3.71
Lorraine Watkins-Mathys3
Estimated H-index: 3
(KUL: Kingston University),
Sid Lowe10
Estimated H-index: 10
(KUL: Kingston University)
There have been a number of debates recently around the development of paradigms and research methodologies in the field of small business and entrepreneurship research. This article focuses on paradigm commensurability by demonstrating how an interpretive framework can be used that, unlike Burrell and Morgan’s (1979) framework, eliminates walls between paradigms and enables paradigms to interpret other paradigms. The authors draw upon Capra’s (1997) conceptual triad to illustrate how a framewor...
Published on Mar 1, 2005in European Journal of Marketing1.72
Andrea Davies9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Leicester),
James A. Fitchett15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Nottingham)
Purpose – This paper is a practical attempt to contribute to the ongoing reappraisal of the dichotomies and categories that have become prevalent throughout marketing research.Design/methodology/approach – The paper reviews current literature on incommensurability and undertakes a comparative re‐examination of two studies.Findings – How the authors view their research is constituted in retrospective terms through a marketing and consumption logic based on the principles of division, distinction ...
Published on Oct 1, 2004in Industrial Management and Data Systems3.73
Liz Lee-Kelley17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Alf Crossman8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Anne Cannings1
Estimated H-index: 1
This paper uses social interaction theory and Tuckman's team development model to report and interpret the findings of a case‐based research into the forming and performance of eight internationally situated virtual project teams operating in the information technology industry. Its objective is to highlight the need to bridge the “gap” between the structural and process orientations of management and virtual team members' situational perceptions and psychological drivers (the “invisibles”). For...
Published on Feb 3, 2004in ACM Sigmis Database
Anne Powell9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SIUE: Southern Illinois University Edwardsville),
Gabriele Piccoli24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Cornell University),
Blake Ives27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UH: University of Houston)
Information technology is providing the infrastructure necessary to support the development of new organizational forms. Virtual teams represent one such organizational form, one that could revolutionize the workplace and provide organizations with unprecedented levels of flexibility and responsiveness. As the technological infrastructure necessary to support virtual teams is now readily available, further research on the range of issues surrounding virtual teams is required if we are to learn h...
Cited By44
Newest
Published on Jan 8, 2019in Production Planning & Control3.34
Maxwell Chipulu7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Southampton),
Udechukwu Ojiako11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UOS: University of Sharjah)
+ 8 AuthorsStuart Maguire14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Sheffield)
Driven by an interest in developing a deeper understanding of stakeholder interests, this study undertakes a dimensional analysis of how different stakeholders assess project outcomes. Most importantly, in our analysis, we take into consideration the largely unaccounted-for conceptual difference between project success and project failure. Data were collected over a two-year period (between 2013 and 2015) from 1631 project stakeholders in nine countries. We analysed the survey data using three-w...
Published on 2019in Economic & Industrial Democracy1.56
Jonathan Morris22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Cardiff University),
John Hassard34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Manchester)
+ 1 AuthorsTakahiro Endo (Hitotsubashi University)
Published on Jul 1, 2019
Luc Brès3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Laval University),
Szilvia Mosonyi (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)+ 4 AuthorsChristopher Wickert9
Estimated H-index: 9
(VU: VU University Amsterdam)
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Scandinavian Journal of Management1.42
Mona Florian (European University Viadrina)
Abstract This article investigates the role of bureaucratic organizing in a grassroots volunteer organization, which emerged during the so-called refugee crisis in an emergency refugee shelter in Germany. Most research agrees that this type of organization is by definition counter-bureaucratic. In the organization I studied, however, volunteers adopted, accepted and acclaimed bureaucratic organizing as the only, natural and self-evident way of making the grassroots work. Drawing on ethnographic ...
Published on Jan 1, 2017
Stephen Cummings13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Victoria University of Wellington),
Todd Bridgman11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Victoria University of Wellington)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael Rowlinson23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Exeter)
Existing narratives about how we should organize are built upon, and reinforce, a concept of 'good management' derived from what is assumed to be a fundamental need to increase efficiency. But this assumption is based on a presentist, monocultural, and generally limited view of management's past. A New History of Management disputes these foundations. By reassessing conventional perspectives on past management theories and providing a new critical outline of present-day management, it highlights...
Published on Jan 1, 2017
Aaron Smith24
Estimated H-index: 24
(RMIT: RMIT University),
Fiona Sutherland2
Estimated H-index: 2
(La Trobe University),
David Gilbert5
Estimated H-index: 5
(RMIT: RMIT University)
This chapter charts the evolution of organizing forms, in particular the nature and scope of exploration and exploitation as complementary forces stimulating change and continuity. The chapter contextualizes the emergence of ambidexterity as the capacity to both use and refine existing knowledge while also creating new knowledge. Further, ambidexterity capability may be leveraged through a duality-based organizing forms architecture, providing the means for enabling organizations to explore and ...
Published on Jan 1, 2017
Maria Carmela Annosi3
Estimated H-index: 3
(WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre),
Federica Brunetta4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Libera Università Internazionale degli Studi Sociali Guido Carli)
In this chapter, the reader, relying on an in-depth description of contemporary forms of production and work organization, will become familiar with the key concepts tied to new organizational forms. More specifically, this chapter focuses on (1) how and why new forms of organizations have come to replace traditional and hierarchical organizational forms; (2) how new organizational forms are conceived to enhance the creative and competitive potential of employees in organizations; (3) how new or...
Published on Jun 10, 2016in Human Relations3.37
Jonathan Morris22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Cardiff University),
Catherine Farrell11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UNSW: University of New South Wales),
Michael Ivor Reed13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Cardiff University)
Whereas historically the UK television industry has been characterized by hierarchy and vertical integration of programme production within a few large broadcasters, new neo-bureaucratic temporary organizational forms have proliferated in the industry in the past 20 years. This has been a product of a variety of factors, including globalization, technological change in the industry, deregulation and cost-cutting. This article draws on research involving 75 participants working in the large broad...
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Scandinavian Journal of Management1.42
Simon Dischner2
Estimated H-index: 2
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf)
Abstract Knowledge about the influence of organizational structure and organizational form on counterproductive work behavior (CWB) has been limited, fragmented, and inconsistent. The contradictory findings from empirical studies were in line with the contradictory predictions of the bureaucracy and post-bureaucracy theories. These theories have opposing views regarding the influence of organizational structure elements and forms on CWB. To perform a competitive test of the bureaucratic and post...