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Discontinuous change in ice cover in Hudson Bay in the 1990s and some consequences for marine birds and their prey

Published on Sep 1, 2012in Ices Journal of Marine Science 3.37
· DOI :10.1093/icesjms/fss040
Anthony J. Gaston15
Estimated H-index: 15
(EC: Environment Canada),
Paul A. Smith18
Estimated H-index: 18
(EC: Environment Canada),
Jennifer F. Provencher14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UVic: University of Victoria)
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Abstract
Arctic ice cover has changed strikingly since the mid-1990s, with the minimum ice extent in the northern hemisphere diminishing by 8.5% per decade since 1981. In the Canadian Arctic, ice cover in June and November showed a step change in the mid-1990s, with little reduction before that. There was a similar step change in northern Hudson Bay. A long-term dataset on marine birds at Coats Island, Nunavut, revealed that many changes in seabird biology also exhibited an abrupt change at, or soon after, the change in ice conditions. This applied to their diet that switched in the 1990s from one dominated by Arctic cod, Boreogadus saida, to one dominated by capelin, Mallotus villosus. Evidence from the proportion of Arctic cod in adult diets suggested that the length of the open-water season may be a good predictor of the switch between Arctic cod and capelin. Other changes, in nestling growth and population trend, may relate to the same ecosystem changes that led to the switch in diet. Abrupt changes, as in the breeding biology of murres at Coats Island, would seem to be characteristic of ecosystem alterations driven by climate change.
  • References (43)
  • Citations (28)
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References43
Newest
Published on May 21, 2012in Marine Ecology Progress Series 2.36
Paul A. Smith18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
Conditions in arctic marine environments are changing rapidly, and understanding the link between environmental and demographic parameters could help to predict the conse- quences of future change for arctic seabirds. Over 20 yr (1988 to 2007), we studied colony atten- dance, adult survival and reproductive success of thick-billed murres, as well as the departure masses and diets of their chicks at Coats Island, Nunavut, Canada (62.95° N, 82.00° W). We eval- uated how each parameter responded to...
24 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 21, 2012in Marine Ecology Progress Series 2.36
Jennifer F. Provencher14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UVic: University of Victoria),
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
+ 1 AuthorsH.G. Gilchrist7
Estimated H-index: 7
Seabird diet indicates changing Arctic marine communities in eastern Canada J. F. Provencher*, A. J. Gaston, P. D. O’Hara, H. G. Gilchrist Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3N5, Canada Science and Technology Branch, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3, Canada Canadian Wildlife Service, Sidney, British Columbia V8L 4B2, Canada
49 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2012in Global Change Biology 8.88
Matthew Spencer20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Liverpool),
Nova Mieszkowska29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom)
+ 15 AuthorsCallan Duck14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Sea Mammal Research Unit)
Regime shifts are sudden changes in ecosystem structure that can be detected across several ecosystem components. The concept that regime shifts are common in marine ecosystems has gained popularity in recent years. Many studies have searched for the step-like changes in ecosystem state expected under a simple interpretation of this idea. However, other kinds of change, such as pervasive trends, have often been ignored. We assembled over 300 ecological time series from seven UK marine regions, c...
16 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2011in Journal of Marine Systems 2.54
Klaus P. Hochheim9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Jennifer V. Lukovich12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UM: University of Manitoba),
David G. Barber37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UM: University of Manitoba)
Abstract In this study we show recent trends in sea ice concentration (SIC) and sea ice extent (SIE) in Hudson Bay (HB) using Canadian Ice Service (CIS) data and passive microwave (PMW) data for the spring period, week of year (WOY) 24–30. Reductions in sea ice concentration and sea ice extent are examined in light of thermodynamic and dynamic forcing of sea ice. Results show surface air temperature (SAT) anomalies surrounding Hudson Bay have been increasing by 0.26 to 0.30 °C/decade from 1960 t...
37 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2011in Marine Biology 2.13
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Carleton University),
Paul A. Smith18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Carleton University)
+ 7 AuthorsRichard A. Phillips47
Estimated H-index: 47
(NERC: Natural Environment Research Council)
The non-breeding movements of marine birds were poorly known until recently, but this information is essential to understanding the risk to different geographical populations from events on the wintering grounds. We tracked the migration routes and wintering areas of Thick-billed Murre Uria lomvia from two breeding colonies in eastern Canada: Coats Island in northern Hudson Bay and The Minarets, Baffin Island, during the period August 2007–May 2008 using geolocation loggers. Birds from The Minar...
34 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2011in Atmospheric Research 4.11
Juergen Bader19
Estimated H-index: 19
(MPG: Max Planck Society),
Michel D. S. Mesquita10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research)
+ 3 AuthorsMartin W. Miles13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research)
The Arctic has undergone substantial changes over the last few decades in various cryospheric and derivative systems and processes. Of these, the Arctic sea ice regime has seen some of the most rapid change and is one of the most visible markers of Arctic change outside the scientific community. This has drawn considerable attention not only from the natural sciences, but increasingly, from the political and commercial sectors as they begin to grapple with the problems and opportunities that are...
106 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 5, 2011in Journal of Geophysical Research 3.23
Adrienne Tivy9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks),
Stephen E. L. Howell21
Estimated H-index: 21
(EC: Environment Canada)
+ 5 AuthorsJohn J. Yackel20
Estimated H-index: 20
(U of C: University of Calgary)
[1] The Canadian Ice Service Digital Archive (CISDA) is a compilation of weekly ice charts covering Canadian waters from the early 1960s to present. The main sources of uncertainty in the database are reviewed and the data are validated for use in climate studies before trends and variability in summer averaged sea ice cover are investigated. These data revealed that between 1968 and 2008, summer sea ice cover has decreased by 11.3% ± 2.6% decade−1 in Hudson Bay, 2.9% ± 1.2% decade−1 in the Cana...
90 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2011in Journal of Field Ornithology 1.85
Donald E. Lyons12
Estimated H-index: 12
(USGS: United States Geological Survey),
Daniel D. Roby29
Estimated H-index: 29
(USGS: United States Geological Survey)
For seabirds raising young under conditions of limited food availability, reducing chick provisioning and chick growth rates are the primary means available to avoid abandonment of a breeding effort. For mostseabirds,however,baselinedatacharacterizingchickgrowthanddevelopmentunderknownfeedingconditions are unavailable, so it is difficult to evaluate chick nutritional status as it relates to foraging conditions near breeding colonies. To address this need, we examined the growth and development o...
15 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 12, 2010in Aquatic Biology 1.30
Emma L. Orlova4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Galina B. Rudneva4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 3 AuthorsAlexandr S. Yurko1
Estimated H-index: 1
Capelin Mallotus villosus is one of the most abundant fish species in the Barents Sea and is a critical link between zooplankton and commercial species such as Atlantic cod. Climatic condi- tions influence the population structure, feeding, and biological condition of capelin by affecting their distribution and that of their zooplankton prey. We sampled more than 1500 stomachs of capelin from 1978, 2002, 2003, 2006, and 2007 spanning years with cold, moderate, and warm climatic conditions, and e...
29 Citations Source Cite
Cited By28
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Journal of Paleolimnology 2.01
Kristopher R. Hadley6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Queen's University),
Andrew M. Paterson27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Ontario Ministry of the Environment)
+ 4 AuthorsJohn P. Smol77
Estimated H-index: 77
(Queen's University)
The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) region of the far north of Ontario (Canada) is expected to undergo considerable physical, chemical and biological change as a result of ongoing climatic change. Previous research in the region has shown marked limnological changes during the past ~ 20 years in relatively deep lakes that have been attributed to increased air temperatures and changes in sea ice phenology in Hudson Bay since the mid-1990s. Here, we present diatom assemblage, primary production and geoc...
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Published on Nov 1, 2017in Polar Biology 2.00
Marianne Falardeau2
Estimated H-index: 2
(McGill University),
Caroline Bouchard12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Laval University)
+ 1 AuthorsLouis Fortier39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Laval University)
An increasing number of boreal marine species are expected to invade the warming Arctic Ocean with the potential to displace endemic species. We provide first evidence that Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus) is expanding its range in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, a region far outside the species temperate-boreal traditional range south of the Bering Strait. To the best of our knowledge, supported by local Inuit knowledge, the species was not present in the area until the present decade...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 2, 2017in PeerJ 2.35
Steven H. Ferguson32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Brent G. Young3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UM: University of Manitoba)
+ 3 AuthorsOle Nielsen7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Fisheries and Oceans Canada)
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Global Change Biology 8.88
Sébastien Descamps17
Estimated H-index: 17
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute),
Jon Aars29
Estimated H-index: 29
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
+ 6 AuthorsHallvard Strøm16
Estimated H-index: 16
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
The Arctic is warming more rapidly than other region on the planet, and the northern Barents Sea, including the Svalbard Archipelago, is experiencing the fastest temperature increases within the circumpolar Arctic, along with the highest rate of sea ice loss. These physical changes are affecting a broad array of resident Arctic organisms as well as some migrants that occupy the region seasonally. Herein, evidence of climate change impacts on terrestrial and marine wildlife in Svalbard is reviewe...
30 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 30, 2016
Hermanni Kaartokallio21
Estimated H-index: 21
(SYKE: Finnish Environment Institute),
Mats A. Granskog24
Estimated H-index: 24
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
+ 1 AuthorsJouni Vainio5
Estimated H-index: 5
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Published on Nov 11, 2016in Science 41.04
Brett R. Scheffers18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UF: University of Florida),
Luc De Meester53
Estimated H-index: 53
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)
+ 14 AuthorsDavid Dudgeon41
Estimated H-index: 41
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
Most ecological processes now show responses to anthropogenic climate change. In terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecosystems, species are changing genetically, physiologically, morphologically, and phenologically and are shifting their distributions, which affects food webs and results in new interactions. Disruptions scale from the gene to the ecosystem and have documented consequences for people, including unpredictable fisheries and crop yields, loss of genetic diversity in wild crop varie...
165 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Ecological Applications 4.38
Nicholas J. Lunn13
Estimated H-index: 13
(U of A: University of Alberta),
Sabrina Servanty9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CSU: Colorado State University)
+ 3 AuthorsIan Stirling62
Estimated H-index: 62
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Changes in the abundance and distribution of wildlife populations are common consequences of historic and contemporary climate change. Some Arctic marine mammals, such as the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), may be particularly vulnerable to such changes due to the loss of Arctic sea ice. We evaluated the impacts of environmental variation on demographic rates for the Western Hudson Bay (WH), polar bear subpopulation from 1984 to 2011 using live-recapture and dead-recovery data in a Bayesian implem...
34 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 13, 2015in Arctic 1.43
Brent G. Young3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Steven H. Ferguson32
Estimated H-index: 32
,
Nicholas J. Lunn13
Estimated H-index: 13
We conducted systematic aerial surveys of ringed seals along strip transects in western Hudson Bay (WHB), Canada, in late May to early June of 1995–97, 1999, 2000, 2007–10, and 2013. The density of ringed seals hauled out on ice over the entire study area ranged from 1.22 seals/km2 in 1995, to 0.20 seals/km2 in 2013. Density estimates varied significantly over the study period and, with the exception of 2013, appeared to follow a cyclical pattern. Although density estimates also appear to follow...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2015in Progress in Oceanography 3.25
George J. Divoky12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Paul M. Lukacs18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UM: University of Montana),
Matthew L. Druckenmiller3
Estimated H-index: 3
Recent major reductions in summer arctic sea ice extent could be expected to be affecting the distributions and life histories of arctic marine biota adapted to living adjacent to sea ice. Of major concern are the effects of ice reductions, and associated increasing SST, on the most abundant forage fish in the Arctic, Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), the primary prey for the region’s upper trophic level marine predators. The black guillemot (Cepphus grylle mandtii) is an ice-obligate diving seabir...
27 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2015in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 4.53
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Carleton University),
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Carleton University)
+ 2 AuthorsMark L. Mallory18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Acadia University)
Abstract Some Arctic food web structures are being affected by climate change with potential consequences for long-term trends of environmental contaminants. We examined the effects of changes in trophic position of an Arctic-breeding seabird, the thick-billed murre ( Uria lomvia ), on declining rates of six major organochlorines (hexachlorobenzene, heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane, dieldrin, p,p ′-DDE and Σ 69 PCB) at two breeding colonies in the Canadian Arctic, one in northern Hudson Bay and ...
13 Citations Source Cite