Branding/Logomark minus arrow-point-to-down Citation Combined Shape Icon/Bookmark-empty Icon/Copy Icon/Collection Icon/Close Copy 7 Icon/List no author result Created with Sketch.
Loading Scinapse...
Discontinuous change in ice cover in Hudson Bay in the 1990s and some consequences for marine birds and their prey
Abstract
Arctic ice cover has changed strikingly since the mid-1990s, with the minimum ice extent in the northern hemisphere diminishing by 8.5% per decade since 1981. In the Canadian Arctic, ice cover in June and November showed a step change in the mid-1990s, with little reduction before that. There was a similar step change in northern Hudson Bay. A long-term dataset on marine birds at Coats Island, Nunavut, revealed that many changes in seabird biology also exhibited an abrupt change at, or soon after, the change in ice conditions. This applied to their diet that switched in the 1990s from one dominated by Arctic cod, Boreogadus saida, to one dominated by capelin, Mallotus villosus. Evidence from the proportion of Arctic cod in adult diets suggested that the length of the open-water season may be a good predictor of the switch between Arctic cod and capelin. Other changes, in nestling growth and population trend, may relate to the same ecosystem changes that led to the switch in diet. Abrupt changes, as in the breeding biology of murres at Coats Island, would seem to be characteristic of ecosystem alterations driven by climate change.

You will get better papers this time

Or are you looking for…
  • Full text
  • References (43)
  • Cited By (27)
  • References (43)
  • Cited By (27)
Klaus P. Hochheim9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Manitoba),
David G. Barber38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Manitoba),
Jennifer V. Lukovich11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Manitoba)
We present an overview of changes in Hudson Bay sea ice in the context of thermodynamic forcing due to increased surface air temperatures and dynamic wind and current forcing mechanisms. Examined in particular is the correspondence between sea ice extent, surface air temperatures, and atmospheric indices during spring and fall from 1980 to 2005. Changes in the timing of freeze-up and break-up over the last several decades were significant. In the spring, temperature trends were consistently posi...
21 Citations Source Cite
Manuel Barange32
Estimated H-index: 32
,
Roger P. Harris45
Estimated H-index: 45
The ocean is a vital component of the metabolism of the Earth and plays a key role in global change. In fact, the oceans cover so much of the Earth's surface that our planet has been described as the Water Planet, and it could be argued that its most extensive ecosystems are marine. Marine ecosystems are inextricably involved in the physical, chemical, biological and societal processes of global change. It is impossible to describe and understand the Earth system without understanding the ocean,...
58 Citations Download PDF Cite
K. P. Hochheim1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Manitoba),
David G. Barber38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Manitoba)
[1] The principal objective of this study is to describe the autumn sea ice regime of Hudson Bay in the context of atmospheric forcing from 1980 to 2005. Both gridded Canadian Ice Service (CIS) data and Passive Microwave (PMW) data are used to examine the freezeup period for weeks of year (WOY) 43–52. Sea ice concentration (SIC) anomalies reveal statistically significant trends, ranging from −23.3% to −26.9% per decade, during WOY 43–48 using the CIS data and trends ranging from −12.7% to −16.8%...
45 Citations Download PDF Cite
David B. Enfield30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory),
Dennis A. Mayer16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory)
Past analyses of tropical Atlantic sea surface temperature variability have suggested a dipole behavior between the northern and southern tropics, across the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). By analyzing an improved 43-year (1950-1992) record of SST (Smith et al., 1996) and other data derived from the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS), it is shown that the regions north and south of the ITCZ are statistically independent of each other at the seasonal to interannual timescales...
589 Citations Download PDF Cite
2011 in Marine Biology [IF: 2.21]
Anthony J. Gaston38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Carleton University),
Paul A. Smith17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Carleton University),
Laura McFarlane Tranquilla7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Memorial University of Newfoundland)
... more
The non-breeding movements of marine birds were poorly known until recently, but this information is essential to understanding the risk to different geographical populations from events on the wintering grounds. We tracked the migration routes and wintering areas of Thick-billed Murre Uria lomvia from two breeding colonies in eastern Canada: Coats Island in northern Hudson Bay and The Minarets, Baffin Island, during the period August 2007–May 2008 using geolocation loggers. Birds from The Minar...
33 Citations Source Cite
Anthony J. Gaston38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Canadian Wildlife Service),
J. Mark Hipfner18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
A. Poole57
Estimated H-index: 57
... more
80 Citations Source Cite
2011 in Journal of Marine Systems [IF: 2.51]
Klaus P. Hochheim9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Manitoba),
Jennifer V. Lukovich11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Manitoba),
David G. Barber38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Manitoba)
Abstract In this study we show recent trends in sea ice concentration (SIC) and sea ice extent (SIE) in Hudson Bay (HB) using Canadian Ice Service (CIS) data and passive microwave (PMW) data for the spring period, week of year (WOY) 24–30. Reductions in sea ice concentration and sea ice extent are examined in light of thermodynamic and dynamic forcing of sea ice. Results show surface air temperature (SAT) anomalies surrounding Hudson Bay have been increasing by 0.26 to 0.30 °C/decade from 1960 t...
37 Citations Source Cite
1985 in Canadian Journal of Zoology [IF: 1.18]
A. J. Gaston1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
D. G. Noble1
Estimated H-index: 1
We collected feeding adult Thick-billed Murres at several different localities within the foraging range of the colonies at Digges Sound through the breeding seasons in 1980, 1981, and 1982. Examination of prey remains from the stomach and foregut showed that the majority of birds contained prey covering a range of sizes from 0.01 to 47 g wet weight at ingestion. The total energy equivalent of prey found in the majority of stomachs was less than 10% of the birds' probable daily requirements. Com...
26 Citations Source Cite
Kenneth P. Burnham55
Estimated H-index: 55
,
David R. Anderson53
Estimated H-index: 53
The second edition of this book is unique in that it focuses on methods for making formal statistical inference from all the models in an a priori set (Multi-Model Inference). A philosophy is presented for model-based data analysis and a general strategy outlined for the analysis of empirical data. The book invites increased attention on a priori science hypotheses and modeling. Kullback-Leibler Information represents a fundamental quantity in science and is Hirotugu Akaike's basis for model sel...
23.8k Citations Source Cite
  • References (43)
  • Cited By (27)
2015 in Progress in Oceanography [IF: 4.27]
George J. Divoky1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Paul M. Lukacs18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Montana),
Matthew L. Druckenmiller3
Estimated H-index: 3
Recent major reductions in summer arctic sea ice extent could be expected to be affecting the distributions and life histories of arctic marine biota adapted to living adjacent to sea ice. Of major concern are the effects of ice reductions, and associated increasing SST, on the most abundant forage fish in the Arctic, Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), the primary prey for the region’s upper trophic level marine predators. The black guillemot (Cepphus grylle mandtii) is an ice-obligate diving seabir...
22 Citations Download PDF Cite
2015 in Arctic [IF: 1.14]
Brent G. Young3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Steven H. Ferguson25
Estimated H-index: 25
,
Nicholas J. Lunn12
Estimated H-index: 12
We conducted systematic aerial surveys of ringed seals along strip transects in western Hudson Bay (WHB), Canada, in late May to early June of 1995–97, 1999, 2000, 2007–10, and 2013. The density of ringed seals hauled out on ice over the entire study area ranged from 1.22 seals/km2 in 1995, to 0.20 seals/km2 in 2013. Density estimates varied significantly over the study period and, with the exception of 2013, appeared to follow a cyclical pattern. Although density estimates also appear to follow...
3 Citations Source Cite
2014 in Marine Pollution Bulletin [IF: 3.24]
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Carleton University),
Anthony J. Gaston38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Carleton University),
Kyle H. Elliott23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Manitoba)
... more
Abstract Twelve marine fish species collected from a thick-billed murre ( Uria lomvia ) breeding colony in northern Hudson Bay in the Canadian Arctic during 2007–2009 were analyzed for legacy organochlorines (e.g. PCBs, DDT), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), perfluorinated carboxylates (PFCAs) and sulfonates (PFSAs), and total mercury (Hg). No one species of prey fish had the highest levels across all contaminant groups analyzed. For the two pelagic fish species sampled, concentrations of...
14 Citations Source Cite
Marianne Marcoux8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Bailey C. McMeans17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Aaron T. Fisk44
Estimated H-index: 44
... more
The diet of individuals within a species commonly differs among sex and age classes because of differences in energy requirements and physiological needs. Belugas Delphinapterus leucas show a high level of sexual habitat segregation and dimorphism that could result in differ- ences in diet between the sexes. Here, we used stable isotopes of carbon (δ 13 C) and nitrogen (δ 15 N) from muscle and skin samples of 88 belugas, and likely prey species, to investigate how beluga diet in Cumberland Sound...
27 Citations Download PDF Cite
2014 in Marine Mammal Science [IF: 1.91]
Brent G. Young3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Manitoba),
Steven H. Ferguson25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Manitoba)
Trends toward increased temperatures, reduced sea ice extent, and longer open water seasons have resulted in changing Arctic ecosystem dynamics. Expected changes include shifts in distribution and abundance of prey species for seabirds and marine mammals. Using stable isotope analysis, we studied spatial and interannual variation in ringed seal (Pusa hispida) feeding ecology in Hudson Bay in relation to environmental variables, between 2003 and 2010. Ringed seal muscle and hair samples collected...
12 Citations Source Cite
2013 in Biological Conservation [IF: 4.66]
Anthony J. Gaston38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Carleton University),
Kyle H. Elliott23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Manitoba),
Yan Ropert-Coudert27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Strasbourg)
... more
Abstract Mapping areas of conservation concern for wildlife in the Arctic is urgently required to evaluate the impact of accelerating development in northern regions. There is substantial evidence that large seabird colonies reduce the availability of food in adjacent waters, creating a zone known as “Ashmole’s Halo”. Given the existence of the halo, Central Place Foraging theory (CPF) allows us to make predictions about the distribution of food and birds at different distances from the colony. ...
17 Citations Source Cite
2012 in Biodiversity
Anthony J. Gaston38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Carleton University),
Maria Gavrilo9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute),
Christine Eberl2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Carleton University)
The dispersal abilities of terrestrial mammals are severely constrained by water crossings, resulting in islands generally supporting less diverse mammal faunas than similar continental areas. In ice-affected Arctic regions, seasonal or permanent ice cover provides a bridging mechanism for dispersal, allowing water gaps to be crossed more rapidly and with less energy cost than is entailed in swimming. Consequently, islands that might be out of reach if waters were open become much more readily c...
3 Citations Download PDF Cite
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Carleton University),
Anthony J. Gaston38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Carleton University),
Keith A. Hobson83
Estimated H-index: 83
(Environment Canada)
... more
Abstract Some Arctic food web structures are being affected by climate change with potential consequences for long-term trends of environmental contaminants. We examined the effects of changes in trophic position of an Arctic-breeding seabird, the thick-billed murre ( Uria lomvia ), on declining rates of six major organochlorines (hexachlorobenzene, heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane, dieldrin, p,p ′-DDE and Σ 69 PCB) at two breeding colonies in the Canadian Arctic, one in northern Hudson Bay and ...
13 Citations Source Cite
2014 in Environmental Research [IF: 4.73]
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Carleton University),
Anthony J. Gaston38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Carleton University),
Robert J. Letcher66
Estimated H-index: 66
(Carleton University)
... more
Abstract A suite of chlorinated, brominated and fluorinated organic contaminants were measured in livers of adult thick-billed murres ( Uria lomvia ) and northern fulmars ( Fulmarus glacialis ) from several locations in the eastern Canadian Arctic during 2007–2008. Thick-billed murres were collected from five colonies (Coats Island, Digges Island, Akpatok Island, Prince Leopold Island, Minarets) and northern fulmars from two colonies (Prince Leopold Island, Minarets). Legacy organochlorines (e.g...
7 Citations Source Cite
2014 in PLOS ONE [IF: 2.77]
Barry G. Robinson5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Alberta),
Alastair Franke7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Alberta),
Andrew E. Derocher49
Estimated H-index: 49
(University of Alberta)
Climate change is occurring more rapidly in the Arctic than other places in the world, which is likely to alter the distribution and abundance of migratory birds breeding there. A warming climate can provide benefits to birds by decreasing spring snow cover, but increases in the frequency of summer rainstorms, another product of climate change, may reduce foraging opportunities for insectivorous birds. Cyclic lemming populations in the Arctic also influence bird abundance because Arctic foxes be...
15 Citations Source Cite

You will get better papers this time

Or are you looking for…