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A grounded exploration of organisational risk propensity

Published on Jul 1, 2009in Journal of Risk Research1.70
· DOI :10.1080/13669870802497751
I.A. Harwood13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Southampton),
Stephen Ward22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Southampton),
Chris Chapman22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Southampton)
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Abstract
Organisational risk propensity directly affects the decision-making behaviour of employees, with linked impacts on the ongoing prosperity of the organisation. The literature on an individual's risk behaviour is extensive. However, few studies investigate the risk propensity of an organisation. This study uses primary data from interviews within a major change programme in a FTSE100 pharmaceutical organisation to explore the characteristics of organisational risk propensity. The data are analysed using open coding procedures from Grounded Theory in order to fragment the category of 'organisational risk propensity' into some constituent properties and dimensions. An integrative framework is then inductively derived which provides insights into risk propensity within the case context; together with some cues for implementing changes to the organisation's risk propensity if so desired. The output from this research also provides a useful base from which to develop a survey instrument for assessing organisational risk propensity.
  • References (47)
  • Citations (19)
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References47
Newest
Published on Aug 1, 2010
Martyn Denscombe18
Estimated H-index: 18
Introduction Part one: Strategies Surveys Case studies Internet research Experiments Action research Ethnography Phenomenology Grounded theory Part two: Methods Questionnaires Interviews Observation Documents Part three: Analysis Quantitative data Qualitative data Writing up the research References Index.
Published on Mar 15, 2009
Jill Collis10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Roger Hussey10
Estimated H-index: 10
1. Understanding Research 2. Dealing with Practical Issues 3. Identifying your Paradigm 4. Designing the Research 5. Searching and Reviewing the Literature 6. Writing your Research Proposal 7. Collecting Qualitative Data 8. Analysing Qualitative Data 9. Integrated Qualitative Data Techniques 10. Collecting Data for Statistical Analysis 11. Analysing Data Using Descriptive Statistics 12. Analysing Data Using Inferential Statistics 13. Writing up the Research 14. Troubleshooting
Published on Jan 1, 2007in Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science
Damien J. Williams2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Jan Noyes24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UoB: University of Bristol)
Perceptions of risk are an inherent part of the decision-making process. What is more, risk perception can be understood as an individual's assessment of risk, and the adequacy of any risk assessment is reliant on the adequacy of the accessible risk information. Consequently, one way to understand the effect of risk perception on decision-making, and the approach taken in this literature review, is to understand how risk information is communicated and received by an individual. A number of fact...
Published on Jan 1, 2007in Journal of Risk Research1.70
J S Busby16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Lancaster University),
Simon Bennett7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Leicester)
A clear distinction is often drawn between the functions of production and protection in organisations. This implies that they have twin capacities -- for production and for protection -- that in some respects will be interdependent and in some independent. In the field of operations management productive capacity is a commonly used construct, and there has been some attempt to develop a parallel construct of protective capacity, but this has only been used to refer to capacity that protects pro...
Published on Dec 1, 2006in British Journal of Management2.75
I.A. Harwood13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Southampton)
Mergers and acquisitions are extremely sensitive, both within and outside the organizations involved. Confidentiality agreements are therefore essential for allowing teams the 'space' to develop potential scenarios for future integration. Despite the importance of confidentiality in practice, the subject has received little coverage in the management literature. By adopting a case-study approach, this research explores aspects of confidentiality in a four-year post-acquisition integration progra...
Published on Jul 1, 2006in Journal of Risk Research1.70
Maryline Specht1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Sorbonne),
François-Régis Chevreau1
Estimated H-index: 1
(ENSMP: Mines ParisTech),
Cédric Denis-Remis3
Estimated H-index: 3
(ENSMP: Mines ParisTech)
Culture is a fuzzy concept embracing overflowing definitions. Nevertheless, our research led us to use this terminology to refer to the set of shared representations used by a group to think and act. This restrictive sense of culture is based on a psychological perspective which has for a long time demonstrated the major role of social representations in human behaviours. Our research domain concerns workers' risk mastering activities implied by both daily behaviours and crises behaviours. Withi...
Published on Feb 1, 2006in International Journal of Project Management4.69
Chris Chapman22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Southampton),
Stephen Ward22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Southampton),
I.A. Harwood13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Southampton)
This paper explores connections between subjective judgements about uncertainty and corporate culture which are relevant to everyone interested in estimating project parameters or interpreting estimates prepared by others. The basis of the discussion is a simple example, drawn from an actual case. It involves estimating the uncertain duration of a project activity in an organisation with two common cultural conditions: a ‘conspiracy of optimism’, and ‘irrational objectivity’. After considering s...
Published on Jan 1, 2006in Journal of Business Research4.03
Jinsook Cho5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison),
Jinkook Lee22
Estimated H-index: 22
(OSU: Ohio State University)
Abstract We investigate the role of perceived risk in consumers' adoption of risk-reducing strategies in the context of household investment decisions. Specifically, we examine behavioral responses intended to handle both the uncertainty and importance dimensions of perceived risk, incorporating risk propensity as another construct affecting risk-induced behaviors. We find that higher self-efficacy, greater wealth position, and risk-taking propensity lower an individual's perceived risk for inve...
Published on Mar 1, 2005in Journal of Risk Research1.70
Nigel Nicholson37
Estimated H-index: 37
(LBS: London Business School),
Emma Soane21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Kingston Business School)
+ 1 AuthorsPaul Willman19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Oxford)
The concept of risk propensity has been the subject of both theoretical and empirical investigation, but with little consensus about its definition and measurement. To address this need, a new scale assessing overall risk propensity in terms of reported frequency of risk behaviours in six domains was developed and applied: recreation, health, career, finance, safety and social. The paper describes the properties of the scale and its correlates: demographic variables, biographical self-reports, a...
Cited By19
Newest
Nathan Zhang (Oxford Brookes University), Alexandros Paraskevas13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UWL: University of West London),
Levent Altinay28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Oxford Brookes University)
Abstract Despite a growing scholarly interest in risk management within the field of hospitality, risk appetite, which plays a key role in effective risk management, has not yet received wider attention. This paper contributes to our understanding of risk appetite by exploring the factors that influence risk appetite in a hotel company context. Through in-depth interviewing with risk appetite experts and corporate-level hotel executives, we identified two sets of factors (‘primary’ and ‘secondar...
Published on Oct 9, 2018in Journal of Risk Research1.70
Pierluigi Martino (UniPi: University of Pisa), Alessandra Rigolini2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UniPi: University of Pisa),
Giuseppe D’Onza3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UniPi: University of Pisa)
AbstractWe examine the influences of chief executive officer (CEO) personal characteristics on family firms’ strategic risk-taking. Building on upper echelons theory, we investigate the influences of CEO family relationships, the CEO professional education, other career experiences, tenure, and career horizon have on the risk level a company takes. By analyzing a sample of 107 Italian family firms listed on the Milan Stock Exchange, we find that company’s risk-taking significantly and negatively...
Published on Jul 1, 2018
Jose Irizar (University of Gloucestershire), Martin G Wynn3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Gloucestershire)
Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present a new maturity model for the assessment and on-going management of project risk management capability in the automotive industry. Design/methodology/approach: The research design is based on a multi-project case study analysis in a major German automotive company. The approach is qualitative and inductive, using 12 in-depth interviews with major stakeholders in the project management function in the company to provide data for the construction o...
Published on Jan 1, 2018
Among the tenets of enterprise risk management (ERM) is the need to instill a risk-aware culture throughout the firm. Yet, how to actually interpret and change organizational culture is generally missing from the ERM literature. Prior surveys found risk managers lacked useful information about organizational culture and cultural change to implement a “risk aware culture.” Our survey of risk managers found this gap persists. The disciplines of organizational studies, business anthropology and soc...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in The Qualitative Report
I.A. Harwood13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Rod Gapp3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Heather Stewart3
Estimated H-index: 3
This paper investigates the potential for Leximancer software to actively support the Grounded Theory (GT) analyst in assessing the ‘completeness’ of their study. The case study takes an existing GT study and retrospectively analyzes the data with Leximancer. The Leximancer output showed encouraging similarities to the main themes emerging from the GT analysis; but not sufficiently at the selective coding level to justifiably claim a definitive cross-check for overall theoretical saturation. Whi...
Published on Feb 25, 2014in Leadership & Organization Development Journal1.46
Tessa E. Basford6
Estimated H-index: 6
(GW: George Washington University)
Purpose – Despite the harmful impact of supervisor transgressions, they have received little empirical attention. The purpose of this paper is to addresses this important gap, examining the nature of transgressions committed at work by supervisors against subordinates. Design/methodology/approach – A critical incident technique was employed in which employees described a transgression committed by their supervisor. Qualitative responses were then analyzed, resulting in the emergence of superviso...
Margarita Georgousopoulou1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Southampton),
Max Chipulu6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 1 AuthorsJ.E.V. Johnson17
Estimated H-index: 17
Purpose – Current research in the area of risk management within small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) appears predisposed towards risk, predominantly dealing with the willingness of SMEs to take on losses. However, in this pilot study, the authors aim to focus on a different aspect of risk management in SMEs, namely the risk preferences. Risk preferences in this case are regarded as the willingness of SME proprietors to take on risks that are likely to lead to investment gains. Design/metho...
Published on Oct 1, 2013
Corporate real estate management has become the strategic management of the company’s real estate portfolio that also includes risk management, to protect the business against developments, which could jeopardise the continuity of the organisation. However, risk management tools just represent the infrastructural and technical precondition, but it also requires an appropriate risk culture by all employees for an effective and comprehensive risk management system. Due to diverse shortcomings iden...
Published on Jun 30, 2013in Brazilian Business Review
Flavia Cavazotte7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Cristiano José Pereira Duarte1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Anna Maria Calvão Gobbo1
Estimated H-index: 1
This study analyzed the influence of authentic leadership on the workers’ safety performance, investigating the psychological mechanisms that explain the connection between authenticity and workplace safety. In addition, individual characteristics that could affect this behavior were also surveyed. The study was conducted based on a sample of 186 workers involved in projects within the oil industry. Results suggested that authentic leadership is associated with the feedback provided by superviso...
Published on Feb 1, 2013in Global Strategy Journal2.73
P.D. Orberg Jensen12
Estimated H-index: 12
(CBS: Copenhagen Business School),
Bent Petersen26
Estimated H-index: 26
(CBS: Copenhagen Business School)
The global sourcing of services offers high returns but is also associated with high risks. The extent to which firms engage in ‘transformational’ global sourcing (i.e., global sourcing implying considerable changes in the home organization) chiefly depends on management’s comfort zone which, in turn, is determined by managers’ risk perceptions, risk tolerance, and ability to employ risk-reducing measures. Many firms move into transformational global sourcing more or less deliberately. However, ...