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Evaluation criteria to assess the value of identification sources for horizon scanning

Published on Jul 1, 2010in International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care 1.42
· DOI :10.1017/S026646231000036X
Joanna Smith3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Birmingham),
Alison Cook9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Birmingham),
Claire Packer11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Birmingham)
Cite
Abstract
Objectives: The English National Horizon Scanning Centre routinely scans thirty-five sources to identify new and emerging health technologies. The aim of the study was to develop and apply evaluation criteria and scores to assess the value of sources, and to identify a cutoff score below which sources would be recommended for removal from routine horizon scanning. Criteria to evaluate each source scanned could result in a more efficient approach in the selection process. Methods: Evaluation criteria were developed following a review of the literature and discussions with horizon analysts. Proposed criteria were piloted on a random selection of six sources, and then applied to all thirty-five sources. The criteria were assessed using the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Results: Eight criteria were identified as being most relevant for assessing the value of scanning sources. The three most important (primary) criteria were coverage (approximate percentage of relevant information), quality (reliable, accurate, objective), and efficiency (estimated time to identify one potentially significant health technology or other relevant information). Seven sources fell beneath the cutoff score and were recommended for removal from routine scanning. Conclusions: The criteria were considered useful in the assessment of current sources, and have the potential to be used to assess new ones. These criteria may be useful for other horizon scanning centers to pilot and validate.
  • References (8)
  • Citations (10)
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References8
Newest
Published on Aug 1, 2008in Health Policy 2.08
C. Wild16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Thomas Langer2
Estimated H-index: 2
Objectives All western healthcare systems are confronted with a rising number of new health technologies. To support decision-making processes with sound information about new health technologies, some countries have established "Horizon Scanning Systems (HSS)". This paper gives an overview of processes and practices of HSS.Method The paper is based on a literature review (Medline and Embase) and on unpublished information gathered from HSS-agencies.Results The 13 current HSS have been collabora...
Published on Jan 1, 2007in Social Science & Medicine 3.09
Karla Douw6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Southern Denmark),
Hindrik Vondeling14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Southern Denmark)
 Several countries have systems in place to support the managed entry of new health technologies. The big challenge for these so-called horizon-scanning systems is to select those technologies that require decision support by means of an early evaluation. Clinical experts are considered a valuable source of information on new health technologies, but research on the relevance of their input is scarce. In 2000, we asked six Danish expert oncologists to predict whether a sample of 19 new anticanc...
Published on Mar 31, 2003in Journal of Medical Internet Research 4.95
Karla Douw6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Hindrik Vondeling14
Estimated H-index: 14
+ 1 AuthorsSue Simpson13
Estimated H-index: 13
BACKGROUND: A number of countries worldwide have structured horizon scanning systems which provide timely information on the impact of new health technologies to decision makers in health care. In general, the agencies that are responsible for horizon scanning have limited resources in terms of budget and staff. In contrast, the number of new and emerging health technologies, i.e. pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and medical and surgical procedures, is growing rapidly. This requires the Horizon...
Published on Nov 13, 1999in BMJ 27.60
Andrew Stevens30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Birmingham),
Ruairidh Milne27
Estimated H-index: 27
+ 1 AuthorsJohn Gabbay24
Estimated H-index: 24
Of the three major pressures on health services worldwide—changing demography, growing expectations, and new healthcare interventions (technologies) —the last is generating the most concern and the most dramatic responses. New healthcare technologies are becoming more numerous, more expensive, and possibly more effective than ever before. About 50 new drugs are launched each year, and the number of new devices, procedures, and ways of providing care is growing all the time. #### Summary points N...
Glenn Robert29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Southampton),
John Gabbay24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Southampton),
Andrew Stevens30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Birmingham)
The purpose of this survey was to assess potential information sources for identifying new health care technologies. A three-round Delphi study was conducted, involving 38 selected experts who suggested and assessed potential sources by applying agreed criteria. Twenty-six potential information sources were considered. Timeliness, time efficiency, and sensitivity were important criteria in determining which were the most important sources. The eight recommended sources were: pharmaceutical journ...
Published on Jan 1, 1985
Thomas L. Saaty77
Estimated H-index: 77
(University of Pittsburgh),
Kevin P. Kearns12
Estimated H-index: 12
This chapter provides an overview of Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), which is a systematic procedure for representing the elements of any problem hierarchically. It organizes the basic rationality by breaking down a problem into its smaller constituent parts and then guides decision makers through a series of pair-wise comparison judgments to express the relative strength or intensity of impact of the elements in the hierarchy. These judgments are then translated to numbers. The AHP includes p...
Cited By10
Newest
Published on Jul 22, 2019in Ergonomics 2.18
Diana Rossi4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Brescia),
Filippo Marciano9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Brescia),
Paolo Cabassa1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Jan 1, 2018in IFAC-PapersOnLine
Filippo Marciano9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Brescia),
Diana Rossi4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Brescia)
+ 1 AuthorsPaola Cocca5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Brescia)
Abstract The objectives of this study are to develop an efficient and generally applicable multi-criteria methodology for choosing the optimal ultrasound device, and to apply it to a case study. The methodology is based on Analytic Hierarchy Process with a Goal (to satisfy company’s objectives in terms of ergonomics, i.e. to optimise workers’ well-being) and three levels of evaluation elements. It provides decision-makers of hospitals or diagnostic centres with a structured methodology to select...
Published on May 8, 2016in Journal of Public Health 1.65
Graham J. Urquhart1
Estimated H-index: 1
(PHE: Public Health England),
Patrick Saunders4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Staffordshire University)
Background:Systematic continuous thinking about the future helps organizations, professions and communities to both prepare for, and shape, the future. This becomes ever more critical given the accelerating rate at which new data emerge, and in some cases uncertainties around their reliability and interpretation. Businesses with the capability to filter and analyse vast volumes of data to create knowledge and insights requiring action have a competitive advantage. Similarly Government and the pu...
Published on Dec 1, 2015in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 2.07
Katharina Schmidt3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Leibniz University of Hanover),
Ines Aumann4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Leibniz University of Hanover)
+ 2 AuthorsJ.-Matthias Graf von der Schulenburg6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Leibniz University of Hanover)
Background The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), developed by Saaty in the late 1970s, is one of the methods for multi-criteria decision making. The AHP disaggregates a complex decision problem into different hierarchical levels. The weight for each criterion and alternative are judged in pairwise comparisons and priorities are calculated by the Eigenvector method. The slowly increasing application of the AHP was the motivation for this study to explore the current state of its methodology in th...
Published on Jan 1, 2015
Lars Gerhold4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Elmar Schüll2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 5 AuthorsAndreas Weßner (TUK: Kaiserslautern University of Technology)
Die zweite Gruppe beinhaltet Standards, die sich aus der Unterscheidung gegenuber anderen Formen der Beschaftigung mit der Zukunft ergeben und die die Befassung mit der Zukunft zur Zukunfts-Forschung machen.
Published on Jan 1, 2015
Paolo Lago1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Ilaria Vallone1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsMichele Tringali
This paper deals with a multi-criteria decision analysis used to identify technologies, which are worth to investigate in the context of Health Regional Trust. In particular, a duodenal-jejunal bypass sleeve, i.e., the EndoBarrier® (GI Dynamics, Australia), is studied and the management of the introduction and its proper use are methodically analyzed. The introduction of this device requires a preliminary study, which involves experts from Clinical Engineering Department of San Matteo Hospital (...
Published on Jun 1, 2014in The Patient: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research 2.67
J. Marjan Hummel9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UT: University of Twente),
John F. P. Bridges27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UT: University of Twente),
Maarten Joost IJzerman39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UT: University of Twente)
The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) has been increasingly applied as a technique for multi-criteria decision analysis in healthcare. The AHP can aid decision makers in selecting the most valuable technology for patients, while taking into account multiple, and even conflicting, decision criteria. This tutorial illustrates the procedural steps of the AHP in supporting group decision making about new healthcare technology, including (1) identifying the decision goal, decision criteria, and altern...
Published on Oct 1, 2013
Axel C. Mühlbacher16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Anika Kaczynski5
Estimated H-index: 5
Problem Regulatory decision bodies and clinical decision-makers have to decide on the approval, pricing and individualized treatment of patients. This decision is based on the assessment of the risk-benefit or cost-benefit ratios. The assessment of benefits often relies on multiple patient-relevant endpoints. Thereby the results of the clinical effects can be contrary. The more endpoints and the more heterogeneous the results, the more complex is the decision-making. The Analytic Hierarchy Proce...