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Ten Steps for Setting Up an Online Journal Club

Published on Jan 21, 2015in Journal of Continuing Education in The Health Professions 1.26
· DOI :10.1002/chp.21275
Teresa M. Chan16
Estimated H-index: 16
(McMaster University),
Brent Thoma15
Estimated H-index: 15
(U of S: University of Saskatchewan)
+ 6 AuthorsMichelle Lin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
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Abstract
© 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education. Journal clubs have an extensive history that dates back to the time of Sir William Osler. They provide a venue to discuss the latest medical literature among groups of peers and are an innovative method for translating knowledge into practice within individual institutions. With advances in social media, journal clubs are poised to take an evolutionary step by harnessing digital connectivity. Online journal clubs are uniting hundreds of medical practitioners from around the world under the banner of one cause: enhancing knowledge translation of the medical literature without the limitations of geography. This article describes 10 steps for creating online journal clubs based on the experiences of a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and medical educators.
  • References (19)
  • Citations (27)
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References19
Newest
Published on May 4, 2015in Medical Teacher 2.71
Esther K. Choo14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Brown University),
Megan L. Ranney18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Brown University)
+ 6 AuthorsChristopher L. Carroll20
Estimated H-index: 20
Twitter is a tool for physicians to increase engagement of learners and the public, share scientific information, crowdsource new ideas, conduct, discuss and challenge emerging research, pursue professional development and continuing medical education, expand networks around specialized topics and provide moral support to colleagues. However, new users or skeptics may well be wary of its potential pitfalls. The aims of this commentary are to discuss the potential advantages of the Twitter platfo...
63 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2014in Emergency Medicine Journal 2.31
Mike D Cadogan5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SCGH: Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital),
Brent Thoma15
Estimated H-index: 15
(U of S: University of Saskatchewan)
+ 1 AuthorsMichelle Lin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
Disruptive technologies are revolutionising continuing professional development in emergency medicine and critical care (EMCC). Data on EMCC blogs and podcasts were gathered prospectively from 2002 through November 2013. During this time there was a rapid expansion of EMCC websites, from two blogs and one podcast in 2002 to 141 blogs and 42 podcasts in 2013. This paper illustrates the explosive growth of EMCC websites and provides a foundation that will anchor future research in this burgeoning ...
91 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2014in Journal of General Internal Medicine 4.61
Neil Mehta8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine),
Tabor E. Flickinger11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UVA: University of Virginia)
Journal clubs have long been a core component of medical education. Initially the purpose of the journal club was to update participants about key medical advances. As the medical literature expanded, journal clubs evolved into forums for discussion of advances in focused medical topics and activities to teach critical appraisal and evidence-based medicine.1 Low attendance and poor participation at face-to-face journal clubs led to experimentation with online synchronous or asynchronous journal ...
22 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2014in Journal of Graduate Medical Education
Lindsay Melvin3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Teresa M. Chan16
Estimated H-index: 16
Faculty and residents are faced with many competing demands on their time, including the need to stay current with the literature and new clinical developments in the specialty. Using technologies available at one’s fingertips allows us to stay current in our fields of interest as clinicians and educators but may seem overwhelming and intimidating at first. To address this challenge, we outline how Twitter can be used as a professional tool to efficiently stay up-to-date in medicine and educatio...
13 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2014in Annals of Emergency Medicine 5.21
Brent Thoma15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Harvard University),
Daniel M. Rolston3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles),
Michelle Lin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
In March 2014, Annals of Emergency Medicine continued a successful collaboration with an academic Web site, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM), to host another Global Emergency Medicine Journal Club session featuring the 2013 New England Journal of Medicine article "Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C (91.4°F) Versus 36°C (96.8°F) After Cardiac Arrest" by Nielsen et al. This online journal club used Twitter conversations, a live videocast with the authors, and detailed discussions o...
22 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2014in Annals of Emergency Medicine 5.21
Teresa M. Chan16
Estimated H-index: 16
(McMaster University),
Hans Rosenberg5
Estimated H-index: 5
(U of O: University of Ottawa),
Michelle Lin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
From January 20 to 24, 2014, Annals continued a successful collaboration with an academic Web site, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM), to host another Global Emergency Medicine Journal Club session featuring the 2013 Journal of the American Medical Association article "Clinical Decision Rules to Rule Out Subarachnoid Hemorrhage for Acute Headache" by Perry et al. This online journal club used the power of rapid Twitter conversations, a live videocast with the authors, and more detailed...
18 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2014in European Urology 17.30
Isaac Thangasamy5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Michael J. Leveridge11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Queen's University)
+ 3 AuthorsHenry H. Woo28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Sydney Adventist Hospital)
Abstract Background Online journal clubs have increasingly been utilised to overcome the limitations of the traditional journal club. However, to date, no reported online journal club is available for international participation. Objective To present a 12-mo experience from the International Urology Journal Club, the world's first international journal club using Twitter, an online micro-blogging platform, and to demonstrate the viability and sustainability of such a journal club. Design, settin...
90 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2014in Annals of Emergency Medicine 5.21
Ryan P. Radecki5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston),
Salim Rezaie5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio),
Michelle Lin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
The Annals November 2013 Journal Club issue marked one of the first collaborations with Academic Life in Emergency Medicine, a medical education blog, in an effort to promote a worldwide, transparent, online effort to perform critical appraisals of journal articles. The Global Emergency Medicine Journal Club was hosted on the blog for 1 week during November 18 to 24, 2013, with comments moderated on the blog and on Twitter. This summary article compiles the discussion and insights.
30 Citations Source Cite
Alexander M. Djuricich1
Estimated H-index: 1
Medical practice and medical journals must adapt to a constantly changing environment, in which social media plays an ever-increasing role. Social media platforms such as Twitter can provide an opportunity to disseminate information in innovative ways. The concept of evidence-based tweeting is introduced, especially as “tweeting the meeting” continues to expand within medical conferences and other venues important for continuing education for health care providers. Future social media strategies...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Annals of Emergency Medicine 5.21
Salim Rezaie5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Anand Swaminathan5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 2 AuthorsMichelle Lin18
Estimated H-index: 18
27 Citations Source Cite
Cited By27
Newest
Published on Jul 16, 2019in Contemporary Nurse 1.22
Paul Ross1
Estimated H-index: 1
(La Trobe University),
Rachel Cross2
Estimated H-index: 2
(La Trobe University)
Source Cite
Published on Sep 3, 2018in Therapeutic Innovation & Regulatory Science 0.90
Jimmy Gonzalez1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Western New England University),
Samantha Bryant (Silver Spring Networks)+ 3 AuthorsEvelyn R. Hermes-DeSantis4
Estimated H-index: 4
(RU: Rutgers University)
Pharmacy graduates interested in postdoctoral training opportunities in drug information or Medical Information have the option to pursue either a fellowship within the pharmaceutical industry or a clinical residency. Limited resources exist for pharmacy students to gain insight into the differences between drug information (DI) and medical information (MI) training programs. The purpose of this project is to identify available opportunities for postdoctoral training in DI or MI disciplines and ...
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Published on Jun 1, 2019
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Published on Apr 18, 2019in Medical Teacher 2.71
Andrew J. Admon3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UM: University of Michigan),
Viren Kaul (ISMMS: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)+ 3 AuthorsJeremy B. Richards8
Estimated H-index: 8
(BIDMC: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center)
AbstractLive discussions on the social media site Twitter or Twitter chats are gaining popularity as powerful tools for engaging a broad audience in an interactive discussion. Medical education, in...
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Published on Feb 1, 2019in The Clinical Teacher
Christie van Diggele2
Estimated H-index: 2
(USYD: University of Sydney),
Annette Burgess10
Estimated H-index: 10
(USYD: University of Sydney),
Craig Mellis38
Estimated H-index: 38
(USYD: University of Sydney)
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Medical Education Online 1.72
Karen A. Friedman3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Hofstra University),
Saori Wendy Herman2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Hofstra University),
Alice Fornari5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Hofstra University)
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in BMC Medical Education 1.87
Yajnavalka Banerjee (Dund.: University of Dundee), Aida J. Azar (University of Medicine and Health Sciences)+ 3 AuthorsDavid A. Davis20
Estimated H-index: 20
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Background Designers of undergraduate medical education (UME) need to address the exponentially expanding volume and variability of scientific knowledge, where by didactic teaching techniques need to be augmented by innovative student-centric pedagogical strategies and implementation of milieus, where information, communication and technology-enabled tools are seamlessly integrated, and lifelong information gathering, assimilation, integration and implementation is the ultimate goal. In UME, the...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports 2.40
Sagar Patel7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Cleveland Clinic),
Navneet S. Majhail42
Estimated H-index: 42
(Cleveland Clinic)
Purpose of Review Social media has dramatically changed the access and exchange of information in healthcare and beyond. A variety of platforms and resources exist allowing blood and marrow transplant providers, researchers, and patients to interact. We review the adoption of social media by the transplantation community.
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Published on Jun 29, 2018in Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Michael Gottlieb5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Rush University Medical Center),
Andrew King2
Estimated H-index: 2
(OSU: Ohio State University)
+ 2 AuthorsJohn Bailitz8
Estimated H-index: 8
Author(s): Gottlieb, Michael; King, Andrew; Byyny, Richard; Parsons, Melissa; Bailitz, John | Abstract: Journal clubs are an important tool for critically appraising articles and keeping up-to-date with the current literature. This paper provides a critical review of the literature on the design and structure of journal clubs in residency education with a focus on preparation, topic selection, implementation, and integration of technology. Recommendations for preparation include developing clear...
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Published on Mar 1, 2018in Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine 1.83
Brent Thoma15
Estimated H-index: 15
(U of S: University of Saskatchewan),
Heather Murray14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Queen's University)
+ 8 AuthorsCalvin Yeh4
Estimated H-index: 4
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Objective In 2015 and 2016, the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine (CJEM) Social Media (SoMe) Team collaborated with established medical websites to promote CJEM articles using podcasts and infographics while tracking dissemination and readership. Methods CJEM publications in the “Original Research” and “State of the Art” sections were selected by the SoMe Team for podcast and infographic promotion based on their perceived interest to emergency physicians. A control group was composed retros...
14 Citations Source Cite