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Conflict on interprofessional primary health care teams – can it be resolved?

Published on Jan 1, 2011in Journal of Interprofessional Care1.77
· DOI :10.3109/13561820.2010.497750
Judith Belle Brown40
Estimated H-index: 40
(UWO: University of Western Ontario),
Laura Lewis3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UWO: University of Western Ontario)
+ 3 AuthorsM. Janet Kasperski6
Estimated H-index: 6
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Abstract
Increasingly, primary health care teams (PHCTs) depend on the contributions of multiple professionals. However, conflict is inevitable on teams. This article examines PHCTs members' experiences with conflict and responses to conflict. This phenomenological study was conducted using in-depth interviews with 121 participants from 16 PHCTs (10 urban and 6 rural) including a wide range of health care professionals. An iterative analysis process was used to examine the verbatim transcripts. The analysis revealed three main themes: sources of team conflict; barriers to conflict resolution; and strategies for conflict resolution. Sources of team conflict included: role boundary issues; scope of practice; and accountability. Barriers to conflict resolution were: lack of time and workload; people in less powerful positions; lack of recognition or motivation to address conflict; and avoiding confrontation for fear of causing emotional discomfort. Team strategies for conflict resolution included interventions by tea...
  • References (23)
  • Citations (87)
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References23
Newest
Published on Oct 26, 2008in Social Work in Health Care1.10
Jane Isaacs Lowe3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Marjatta Herranen3
Estimated H-index: 3
Out of the recognition that chronic renal failure has psychological and social as well as medical ramifications, the renal treatment team is composed of different professionals. As these disciplines respond to the psychosocial and medical dimensions, potential for role conflict arises. The paper focuses on this problem as it relates to the responsibilities of the social worker and the nurse clinician. The process is studied from the theoretical framework of role conflict, ambiguity, crisis, and ...
Published on Jan 1, 2008in Journal of Interprofessional Care1.77
Susan Baxter17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Shelagh Brumfitt12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Sheffield)
UK government policy is encouraging healthcare staff to blur traditional roles, in the drive to increase joint working between practitioners. However, there is currently a lack of clarity regarding the impact that changes to traditional working practice might have on staff delivering the services, or on patient care. In this article, we report findings from three qualitative case studies examining interprofessional practice in stroke care, in which the influence of professional differences emerg...
Published on Jul 1, 2007in Nursing administration quarterly
Tova Hendel7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Miri Fish2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Ornit Berger1
Estimated H-index: 1
In today's complex healthcare organizations, conflicts between physicians and nurses occur daily. Consequently, organizational conflict has grown into a major subfield of organizational behavior. Researchers have claimed that conflict has a beneficial effect on work group function and identified col
Published on Aug 1, 2006in AORN Journal0.84
Barbara A. Hocking1
Estimated H-index: 1
ABSTRACT • UNHEALTHY CONFLICT in health care settings creates stress for nurses. Unresolved conflict generates feelings of being overwhelmed or “swamped.” • BY USING REFLECTION, it is possible to gain insight into underlying beliefs and behaviors concerning conflict. • INSIGHT GAINED FROM REFLECTION can help nurses create a harmonious, advantaged environment, which supports them in their quest to provide high quality patient care. AORN J 84 (August 2006) 249–259. © AORN, Inc, 2006.
Published on Jun 1, 2006in Medical Care Research and Review2.58
Louise Lemieux-Charles22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
Wendy McGuire5
Estimated H-index: 5
This review of health care team effectiveness literature from 1985 to 2004 distinguishes among intervention studies that compare team with usual (nonteam) care; intervention studies that examine the impact of team redesign on team effectiveness; and field studies that explore relationships between team context, structure, processes, and outcomes. The authors use an Integrated Team Effectiveness Model (ITEM) to summarize research findings and to identify gaps in the literature. Their analysis sug...
Published on May 1, 2006in Oncologist5.25
Richard T. Penson45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Harvard University),
Helena Kyriakou1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Harvard University)
+ 2 AuthorsThomas J. Lynch68
Estimated H-index: 68
(Harvard University)
Correspondence: Richard T. Penson, M.R.C.P., M.D., Division of Hematology-Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Yawkey 9066, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114-2617, USA. Telephone: 617-726-5867; Fax: 617-724-6898; e-mail: rpenson@partners.org Received April 7, 2006; accepted for publication April 7, 2006. ©AlphaMed Press 1083-7159/2006/$20.00/0 Abstract Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), founded The Kenn...
Published on Feb 1, 2006in Journal of Advanced Nursing2.38
Patricia Hill Bailey12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Linda Jones1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Daniel Way3
Estimated H-index: 3
Aims. This paper presents the experiences of nurse practitioners and family physicians working in collaborative practice at four Canadian rural primary care agencies. It focuses on the qualitative segment of a larger study examining the impact of an educational intervention on interprofessional practice. Background. Growing awareness of the importance of health promotion and disease prevention, the increased complexity of community-based care, and the need to use scarce human healthcare resource...
Published on May 1, 2005in Nursing Management
Audrey Smith1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Greg Nelson1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Jan 1, 2005in Nursing Management (springhouse)
Alan H. Rosenstein13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Michelle O’Daniel5
Estimated H-index: 5
Overview: Providing safe, error-free care is the number-one priority of all health care professionals. Excellent outcomes have been associated with procedural efficiency, the implementation of evidence-based standards, and the use of tools designed to reduce the likelihood of medical error (such as computerized medication orders and bar-coded patient identification). But the impact of work relationships on clinical outcomes isn’t as well documented. Overview: The current survey was designed as a...
Published on Mar 10, 2004in JAMA51.27
Kevin Grumbach55
Estimated H-index: 55
,
Thomas Bodenheimer56
Estimated H-index: 56
In health care settings, individuals from different disciplines come together to care for patients. Although these groups of health care personnel are generally called teams, they need to earn true team status by demonstrating teamwork. Developing health care teams requires attention to 2 central questions: who is on the team and how do team members work together? This article chiefly focuses on the second question. Cohesive health care teams have 5 key characteristics: clear goals with measurab...
Cited By87
Newest
Published on Nov 29, 2018in Journal of Interprofessional Care1.77
Veronica O'Carroll1
Estimated H-index: 1
(St And: University of St Andrews)
ABSTRACTInterprofessional collaboration (IPC) is important for the delivery of effective integrated health and social care systems. Interprofessional practice learning (IPPL) enables students to learn to work together within a relevant context and prepare for future IPC. While there is some evidence that negative attitudes impact on IPC and interprofessional education, there is a dearth of research on health and social work professionals’ attitudes and perspectives of IPC and IPPL opportunities ...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Journal of Interprofessional Care1.77
Erika Gergerich3
Estimated H-index: 3
(NMSU: New Mexico State University),
Daubney Harper Boland1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Mary Alice Scott2
Estimated H-index: 2
(NMSU: New Mexico State University)
ABSTRACTAdverse patient outcomes are often the result of conflict or poor communication among healthcare professionals. Use of interprofessional care teams can improve healthcare and delivery of services. Healthcare systems have been historically hierarchical in nature with physicians regularly taking a leadership position. The presence of hierarchy can be a source of conflict in interprofessional healthcare teams. This article analyzes qualitative data from a four-day interprofessional training...
Published on Jul 22, 2019in Journal of Interprofessional Care1.77
Junko Fujita6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Juntendo University),
Sakiko Fukui1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Osaka University)
+ 1 AuthorsMayuko Tsujimura2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Chiba University)
ABSTRACTOur group developed an interprofessional education (IPE) program for home-based end-of-life (EOL) care among health and welfare professionals, with the purpose of understanding professional...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of Pain and Symptom Management3.38
Jennifer K. Walter8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia),
Jennifer K. Walter (Children's Hospital of Philadelphia)+ 6 AuthorsChris Feudtner53
Estimated H-index: 53
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia)
Abstract Context Interprofessional teams often develop a care plan before engaging in a family meeting in the pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (CICU)—a process that can affect the course of the family meeting and alter team dynamics but that has not been studied. Objectives To characterize the types of interactions that interprofessional team members have in pre–family meeting huddles in the pediatric CICU by 1) evaluating the amount of time each team member speaks; 2) assessing team commun...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Enfermería Clínica
Cicilia Ika (UI: University of Indonesia), Enie Novieastari1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UI: University of Indonesia),
Tuti Nuraini1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UI: University of Indonesia)
Abstract Objective The head nurse is the first line manager in a working unit who is responsible for preventing and solving conflicts. Unmanaged interdisciplinary conflicts can result in decline quality of the healthcare service. This study explores the head nurses’ experiences in preventing interdisciplinary conflicts. Method This study was a qualitative study using descriptive-phenomenological approach. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with twelve head nurse of a central hospita...
Published on May 24, 2019in Journal of Clinical Nursing1.76
The‐Phung To3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Melbourne),
The‐Phung To (University of Melbourne)+ 1 AuthorsDavid A Story32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Melbourne)
Published on May 1, 2019in Radiography
Abstract Introduction The work of a radiographer includes using technology to produce x-ray images. The technology employed could either be analogue or digital technology. Over the last 20–25 years analogue-trained radiographers in South Africa have had to produce x-ray images using digital technology. The aim of this paper is to explore and describe the experiences of analogue-trained radiographers utilising digital imaging in projection radiography. Methods The study used a qualitative, explor...
Published on Apr 13, 2019
Marion Jones5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Jill Thistlethwaite22
Estimated H-index: 22
Published on Oct 11, 2018in Medical Teacher2.71
Michael Broukhim1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of California, Berkeley),
Francis K. O. Yuen5
Estimated H-index: 5
(CSUS: California State University, Sacramento)
+ 4 AuthorsMichael S. Wilkes26
Estimated H-index: 26
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
AbstractBackground: Whenever health professionals work together as a team, conflict is inevitable – some would argue even necessary. However, conflict can have negative effects on patient care, job satisfaction, personal wellness, and professional productivity.Purpose: This study aims to describe interprofessional conflicts in a hospital setting from the perspective of three groups of health science students.Methods: An online questionnaire survey collected data from 225 health science students ...
Published on Mar 4, 2019in Journal of Interprofessional Care1.77
Sarah Burm2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UWO: University of Western Ontario),
Lisa Faden3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UWO: University of Western Ontario)
+ 3 AuthorsMark Goldszmidt12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UWO: University of Western Ontario)
ABSTRACTToday’s hospitals are burdened with patients who have complex health needs. This is readily apparent in an inpatient internal medicine setting. While important elements of effective interprofessional collaboration have been identified and trialled across clinical settings, their promise continues to be elusive. One reason may be that caring for patients requires understanding the size and complexity of healthcare networks. For example, the non-human ‘things’ that healthcare providers wor...
View next paperThe conceptual basis for interprofessional collaboration: core concepts and theoretical frameworks.