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Imaging of viruses by atomic force microscopy

Published on Sep 1, 2001in Journal of General Virology2.81
· DOI :10.1099/0022-1317-82-9-2025
Yu. G. Kuznetsov19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UCI: University of California, Irvine),
Alexander J. Malkin22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UCI: University of California, Irvine)
+ 2 AuthorsAlexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCI: University of California, Irvine)
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Abstract
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image a variety of virus particles in vitro and could, conceivably, be used as a useful diagnostic for their presence, their structural characterization and even their identification. Virus particles can be imaged by AFM in air, under alcohol or in physiological medium, and accurate measurements of their dimensions obtained. In addition, the appearance and organization of capsomere structures on their surfaces are frequently visible. A number of viruses and virus crystals have been imaged successfully using AFM and improvements in AFM technology and sample handling will undoubtedly increase even more its power, resolution and scope.
  • References (27)
  • Citations (114)
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References27
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2000in Chemistry & Biology
Adam T. Woolley40
Estimated H-index: 40
(Harvard University),
Chin Li Cheung19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Harvard University)
+ 1 AuthorsCharles M. Lieber140
Estimated H-index: 140
(Harvard University)
Abstract Carbon nanotubes represent ideal probes for high-resolution structural and chemical imaging of biomolecules with atomic force microscopy. Recent advances in fabrication of carbon nanotube probes with sub-nanometer radii promise to yield unique insights into the structure, dynamics and function of biological macromolecules and complexes.
Published on Mar 1, 2000in Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews15.26
Timothy S. Baker71
Estimated H-index: 71
(Purdue University),
Norman H. Olson43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Purdue University),
S. D. Fuller1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Oxford)
Viruses are cellular parasites. The linkage between viral and host functions makes the study of a viral life cycle an important key to cellular functions. A deeper understanding of many aspects of viral life cycles has emerged from coordinated molecular and structural studies carried out with a wide range of viral pathogens. Structural studies of viruses by means of cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction methods have grown explosively in the last decade. Here we revi...
Published on Aug 1, 1999in Journal of Structural Biology3.75
Alexander J. Malkin22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UCI: University of California, Irvine),
Yurii G. Kuznetsov16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UCI: University of California, Irvine)
+ 1 AuthorsAlexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCI: University of California, Irvine)
Abstract In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate surface evolution during the growth of single crystals of turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV). Growth of the (101) face of TYMV crystals proceeded by two-dimensional nucleation. The molecular structure of the step edges and adsorption of individual virus particles and their aggregates on the crystalline surface were recorded. The surfaces of individual virions within crystals were visualized and seen to be quite distinctive wit...
Published on Aug 1, 1999
Alexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
The history and character of macromolecular crystals principles of macromolecular structure and the applications of x-ray crystallography the purification and characterization of biological macromolecules some physical and energetic principles practical procedures for macromolecular crystallization important considerations in macromolecular crystallization strategies and special approaches in growing crystals impurities, defects, and crystal quality the mechanisms and kinetics of macromolecular ...
Published on Jan 1, 1999
John E. Johnson71
Estimated H-index: 71
(Scripps Research Institute),
Jeffrey A. Speir23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Scripps Research Institute)
Published on Mar 1, 1998in Journal of Molecular Biology5.07
Steven B. Larson13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
John Day15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
+ 1 AuthorsAlexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
Abstract The molecular structure of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) has been refined to 1.8 A resolution using X-ray diffraction data collected from crystals grown in microgravity. The final R value was 0.179 and R free was 0.184 for 219,086 independent reflections. The final model of the asymmetric unit contained amino acid residues 13 to 159 of a coat protein monomer, 21 nucleotides, a sulfate ion, and 168 water molecules. The nucleotides were visualized as 30 helical segments of nine ba...
Published on Jan 1, 1998
Trevor Williams56
Estimated H-index: 56
Invertebrate iridescent viruses (IVs) belong to the family Iridoviridae, which are large icosahedral viruses with a large genome of double-stranded DNA. These viruses are not occluded in a protective protein matrix, unlike the well-known nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs), granuloviruses (GVs), cytoplasmic polyhedrosis viruses (CPVs), and entomopoxviruses (EPVs). Members of the Iridoviridae, are structurally complex, however, and show a number of unique characteristics in terms of their genomic organ...
Published on May 1, 1997in Biophysical Journal3.67
Kuznetsov YuG1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
A Malkin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
+ 4 AuthorsAlexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images at the molecular level have been obtained for a number of different protein and virus crystals. They can be utilized in some special cases to obtain information useful to crystal structure analyses by x-ray diffraction. In particular, questions of space group enantiomer, the packing of molecules within a unit cell, the number of molecules per asymmetric unit, and the dispositions of multiple molecules within the asymmetric unit may be resolved. In addition, b...
Published on Mar 1, 1997in Trends in Biotechnology13.75
Stephanie Allen29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Nottingham),
Martyn C. Davies52
Estimated H-index: 52
(University of Nottingham)
+ 2 AuthorsPhilip M. Williams33
Estimated H-index: 33
(University of Nottingham)
The past decade has seen the atomic force microscope evolve not only as a high resolution imaging tool, but also as an instrument capable of measuring forces between surfaces and the material properties of samples. Here, the use of atomic force microscopy for surface force measurement is reviewed, highlighting the considerable progress that has recently been made in the area of biotechnology. Particular emphasis is placed on how the instrument can be used to probe directly biomolecular interacti...
Published on Sep 1, 1996in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology12.11
Mary A. Canady2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
Steven B. Larson13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
+ 1 AuthorsAlexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
The structure of turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) has been solved to 3.2 A resolution and an R-value of 18.7%. The structure is consistent with models based on low resolution X-ray and electron microscopy studies, with pentameric and hexameric protein aggregates protruding from the surface and forming deep valleys at the quasi three-fold axes. The N-terminal 26 residues of the A-subunit are disordered, while those of the B- and C-subunits are seen to interact around the interior of the quasi si...
Cited By114
Newest
Angelo Marcelo Tusset14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UTFPR: Federal University of Technology - Paraná),
Mauricio A. Ribeiro1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UTFPR: Federal University of Technology - Paraná)
+ 2 AuthorsJosé Manoel Balthazar26
Estimated H-index: 26
(UTFPR: Federal University of Technology - Paraná)
Purpose In this work, the nonlinear dynamics and control of an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) model in fractional-order were investigated.
Published on Jul 2, 2019in Nonlinear Dynamics4.60
Aliasghar Keyvani3
Estimated H-index: 3
(TU Delft: Delft University of Technology),
S Tamer Mehmet2
Estimated H-index: 2
(TU Delft: Delft University of Technology)
+ 2 AuthorsFred van Keulen26
Estimated H-index: 26
(TU Delft: Delft University of Technology)
Many investigations have focused on steady-state nonlinear dynamics of cantilevers in tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). However, a transient dynamic model—which is essential for a model-based control design—is still missing. In this paper, we derive a mathematical model which covers both the transient and steady-state behavior. The steady-state response of the proposed model has been validated with existing theories. Its transient response, however, which is not covered with existin...
Published on May 12, 2019in Scanning1.24
Andreas Stylianou10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UCY: University of Cyprus),
Stylianos-Vasileios Kontomaris2
Estimated H-index: 2
(NTUA: National Technical University of Athens)
+ 1 AuthorsEleni Alexandratou8
Estimated H-index: 8
(NTUA: National Technical University of Athens)
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an easy-to-use, powerful, high-resolution microscope that allows the user to image any surface and under any aqueous condition. AFM has been used in the investigation of the structural and mechanical properties of a wide range of biological matters including biomolecules, biomaterials, cells, and tissues. It provides the capacity to acquire high-resolution images of biosamples at the nanoscale and allows at readily carrying out mechanical characterization. The ca...
Published on Apr 3, 2018in Nanotechnology3.40
Shivani Sharma16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles),
M LeClaire1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles),
James K. Gimzewski61
Estimated H-index: 61
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)
Published on Mar 23, 2018in International Journal of Molecular Sciences4.18
Jiabin Wang2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Meijun Liu + 3 AuthorsDaniel Mark Czajkowsky
One of the most successful applications of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in biology involves monitoring the effect of force on single biological molecules, often referred to as force spectroscopy. Such studies generally entail the application of pulling forces of different magnitudes and velocities upon individual molecules to resolve individualistic unfolding/separation pathways and the quantification of the force-dependent rate constants. However, a less recognized variation of this method, th...
Published on Jan 1, 2018
Martin Delguste2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UCL: Université catholique de Louvain),
Melanie Koehler4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UCL: Université catholique de Louvain),
David Alsteens30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UCL: Université catholique de Louvain)
Published on Dec 15, 2017in Applied and Environmental Microbiology4.08
J. Shim (IIT: Illinois Institute of Technology), D.S. Stewart (FDA: Food and Drug Administration)+ 4 AuthorsY. C. Shieh3
Estimated H-index: 3
(FDA: Food and Drug Administration)
Published on Aug 31, 2017in Minerals2.25
Cheng Zeng4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Caitlin Vitale-Sullivan1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Xiang Ma14
Estimated H-index: 14
Through billions of years of evolution, nature has been able to create highly sophisticated and ordered structures in living systems, including cells, cellular components and viruses. The formation of these structures involves nucleation and self-assembly, which are fundamental physical processes associated with the formation of any ordered structure. It is important to understand how biogenic materials self-assemble into functional and highly ordered structures in order to determine the mechani...
View next paperBiomolecular Imaging with the Atomic Force Microscope