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Urine spraying in cats: presence of concurrent disease and effects of a pheromone treatment

Published on Jan 1, 1999in Applied Animal Behaviour Science 1.82
· DOI :10.1016/S0168-1591(98)00195-6
D.F Frank1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Cornell University),
Hollis N. Erb57
Estimated H-index: 57
(Cornell University),
Katherine A. Houpt39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Cornell University)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract Thirty four spraying cats, belonging to 24 households, had a complete physical examination, CBC, blood biochemistry panel, urinalysis, urine culture, urine cortisol:creatinine analysis and abdominal radiographs. Diagnostic procedures revealed some abnormalities and/or crystalluria in 13 patients (38%). Seven (20%) of these cats had medical conditions involving the urogenital system (renal calculi, renal failure, cystic calculi, bacterial urinary infection or cystitis associated with the presence of ammonium biurate crystalluria). The other six had crystalluria. A synthetic analogue of feline cheek gland pheromones (Feliway™, Sanofi Sante Nutrition Animale, Abbott Laboratories) was then evaluated as a treatment of urine spraying. The study was done on all 34 cats but complete data was obtained for only 22 cats belonging to 19 out of the 24 households. Nine of these cats had abnormalities and/or crystalluria. The results were highly significant: 14 households (74%; 95% confidence interval 49–91%) reported a decrease of spraying frequency.
  • References (21)
  • Citations (52)
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References21
Newest
Published on Aug 28, 2003
G. M. Landsberg1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
W. Hunthausen1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Ackerman. L.1
Estimated H-index: 1
1. Behaviour counseling and the veterinary practitioner 2. Puppy and kitten development 3. Prevention: the best medicine 4. Behaviour counseling and behavior diagnostics 5. Treatment: behavior modification techniques 6. Phamacologic intervention in behavioural therapy 7. Complementary and alternative therapy for behavior problems 8. Feeding and diet related problems 9. Pain assessment, pain management, sedation and anesthesia 10. Stereotypic and compulsive disorders 11. Fears and phobias 12. The...
Published on Apr 1, 1997in Applied Animal Behaviour Science 1.82
Joël Dehasse1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract Ten percent of all cats spray in adulthood. The sequence of urine spraying and its triggering stimuli are analyzed and its pharmacological treatment summarized. Clomipramine (Anafranil ® ) has been tested on 26 cats at the dosage of 5 mg once a day. Results are highly significant: clomipramine is responsible for a reduction of urine spraying (of more than 75%) in 80% of the cats. In clinical use, clomipramine is recommended at the dosage of 0.25 to 0.5 mg kg −1 twice a day.
Published on Jan 1, 1997
Karen L. Overall1
Estimated H-index: 1
Animal behaviour treatment is a growing component in today's veterinary practice. This is an authoritative, scientifically-based reference on preventing, diagnosing and successfully treating behaviour cases. Every kind of problem, from aggressive behaviour to self-mutilation is discussed. It offers step-by-step guidelines, so practitioners can successfully manage behavioural problems from the first indication.
Published on Jan 1, 1996
Victoria L. Voith12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Peter L. Borchelt9
Estimated H-index: 9
Published on May 1, 1996in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 2.29
Carolyn J. Henry30
Estimated H-index: 30
(WSU: Washington State University),
Terrence P. Clark8
Estimated H-index: 8
(AU: Auburn University)
+ 1 AuthorsSpano Js11
Estimated H-index: 11
(AU: Auburn University)
Urine cortisokcreatinine ratios (UCCR) were determined from single urine samples obtained by cystocentesis in 47 cats allotted into 2 groups: 31 healthy cats and 16 sick, hospitalized cats with assorted clinical illnesses. The mean (± standard deviation) UCCR for healthy cats was 5.9 ± 7.0 (median, 3.2; range, 0.6 to 27.8). Age or gonadal status had no significant effect on the magnitude of UCCR within this group. However, sick cats had significantly higher UCCR (P = .002) when compared with hea...
Published on Mar 1, 1996in Veterinary Clinics of North America-small Animal Practice 1.27
C. A. Osborne12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
Jody P. Lulich26
Estimated H-index: 26
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
+ 1 AuthorsK. A. Bird10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
Crystalluria results from oversaturation of urine with crystallogenic substances. However, oversaturation may occur as a result of in vivo and in vitro events. Therefore, care must be used not to overinterpret the significance of crystalluria. Evaluation of urine crystals may aid in (1) detection of disorders predisposing cats to urolith or matrix-crystalline urethral plug formation; (2) estimation of the mineral composition of uroliths or urethral plugs; and (3) evaluation of the effectiveness ...
Published on Jan 15, 1996
Henry R. Askew1
Estimated H-index: 1
Introduction to pet behaviour counselling. Part 1 Pet behaviour counselling: pets in the human family general nature of dog and cat behaviour problems process of pet behavioural counselling treating behaviour problems practice elements, professionalism and ethical behaviour. Part 2 Canine behavioural problems: understanding dog behaviour general treatment principles 1 - changing owner beliefs and interactive ground rules general treatment principles 2 - obedience training, training in problem si...
Cited By52
Newest
Published on Sep 28, 2018in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 1.58
Daniela Ramos5
Estimated H-index: 5
(USP: University of São Paulo),
Archivaldo Reche-Junior2
Estimated H-index: 2
(USP: University of São Paulo)
+ 5 AuthorsGeni Cristina Fonseca Patricio2
Estimated H-index: 2
(USP: University of São Paulo)
Objective The aim was to perform a case-control medical evaluation of cats from multi-cat households presenting with inappropriate latrining and spraying behavior. Methods Owners of 18 ‘spraying’ and 23 ‘latrining’ cats with normal control subjects available from the same households were recruited for a case-control study. Otherwise overtly healthy dyads (each dyad consisting of a case cat and a control cat) were brought together to the veterinary hospital of the University of Sao Paulo for a me...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 1.58
Debra F Horwitz2
Estimated H-index: 2
Practical relevance:Urine spraying (synonymous terms include urine marking or scent marking) is commonly described as urine deposited on vertical surfaces while the cat is in a standing position. With the increasing trend of keeping cats indoors in some countries and the potential resultant increase in frustration-related behaviors, urine spraying may occur in the home. Although also a normal feline behavior, it is usually not deemed acceptable when the cat targets household possessions. Urine s...
Published on May 28, 2018in Frontiers in Veterinary Science
Ana Maria Barcelos1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Lincoln),
Kevin McPeake3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Lincoln)
+ 1 AuthorsDaniel Mills29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Lincoln)
Urinary house soiling (periuria) in the home is a common but serious behaviour problem in cats. Although many specific risk factors and triggers have been postulated, their importance is largely unknown. This study assessed: (1) the significance of purported risk factors for periuria as well as specifically marking and latrine behaviour in the home; (2) the specificity and sensitivity of signs commonly used to differentiate latrine and marking behaviour. Owner responses to an internet survey (n=...
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 1.58
Marta Amat9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Autonomous University of Barcelona),
Tomàs Camps4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Autonomous University of Barcelona),
X. Manteca28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Autonomous University of Barcelona)
Domestic cats are exposed to a variety of stressful stimuli, which may have a negative effect on the cats’ welfare and trigger a number of behavioural changes. Some of the stressors most commonly encountered by cats include changes in environment, inter-cat conflict, a poor human–cat relationship and the cat’s inability to perform highly motivated behaviour patterns. Stress is very likely to reduce feed intake, and stress-related anorexia may contribute to the development of potentially serious ...
Published on Jan 1, 2016
Kersti Seksel1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Jan 1, 2016
Jacqueline M. Ley1
Estimated H-index: 1