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The Loss of Skeletal Muscle Strength, Mass, and Quality in Older Adults: The Health, Aging and Body Composition Study

Published on Oct 1, 2006in Journals of Gerontology Series A-biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 4.90
· DOI :10.1093/gerona/61.10.1059
Bret H. Goodpaster80
Estimated H-index: 80
(University of Pittsburgh),
Seok Won Park18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 7 AuthorsA. B. Newman140
Estimated H-index: 140
(University of Pittsburgh)
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The loss of muscle mass is considered to be a major determinant of strength loss in aging. However, large-scale longitudinal studies examining the association between the loss of mass and strength in older adults are lacking. METHODS: Three-year changes in muscle mass and strength were determined in 1880 older adults in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. Knee extensor strength was measured by isokinetic dynamometry. Whole body and appendicular lean and fat mass were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography. RESULTS: Both men and women lost strength, with men losing almost twice as much strength as women. Blacks lost about 28% more strength than did whites. Annualized rates of leg strength decline (3.4% in white men, 4.1% in black men, 2.6% in white women, and 3.0% in black women) were about three times greater than the rates of loss of leg lean mass ( approximately 1% per year). The loss of lean mass, as well as higher baseline strength, lower baseline leg lean mass, and older age, was independently associated with strength decline in both men and women. However, gain of lean mass was not accompanied by strength maintenance or gain (ss coefficients; men, -0.48 +/- 4.61, p =.92, women, -1.68 +/- 3.57, p =.64). CONCLUSIONS: Although the loss of muscle mass is associated with the decline in strength in older adults, this strength decline is much more rapid than the concomitant loss of muscle mass, suggesting a decline in muscle quality. Moreover, maintaining or gaining muscle mass does not prevent aging-associated declines in muscle strength.
  • References (40)
  • Citations (1213)
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References40
Newest
Published on Oct 1, 2003in Journal of Applied Physiology 3.26
Timothy J. Doherty26
Estimated H-index: 26
Aging is associated with progressive loss of neuromuscular function that often leads to progressive disability and loss of independence. The term sarcopenia is now commonly used to describe the loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs in concert with biological aging. By the seventh and eighth decade of life, maximal voluntary contractile strength is decreased, on average, by 20-40% for both men and women in proximal and distal muscles. Although age-associated decreases in strength ...
1,108 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2003in The Journal of Physiology
Scott Trappe48
Estimated H-index: 48
(Ball State University),
Philip M. Gallagher21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Ball State University)
+ 3 AuthorsTodd A. Trappe44
Estimated H-index: 44
(University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)
The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was an age-related decline in the isometric and isotonic contractile function of permeabilized slow (MHC I) and fast (MHC IIa) single muscle fibres. Vastus lateralis muscle fibres from six young men (YM; 25 ± 1 years), six young women (YW; 25 ± 1 years), six old men (OM; 80 ± 4 years) and six old women (OW; 78 ± 2 years) were studied at 15 °C for in vitro force-velocity properties, peak force and contractile velocity. Peak power was 23-28 ...
227 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2003in Journal of Applied Physiology 3.26
Marjolein Visser76
Estimated H-index: 76
(VU University Amsterdam),
Marco Pahor95
Estimated H-index: 95
+ 5 AuthorsTamara B. Harris170
Estimated H-index: 170
Changing body composition has been suggested as a pathway to explain age-related functional decline. No data are available on the expected changes in body composition as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a population-based cohort of older persons. Body composition data at baseline, 1-yr follow-up, and 2-yr follow-up was measured by DXA in 2,040 well-functioning black and white men and women aged 70-79 yr, participants of the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study. After 2 ...
160 Citations Source Cite
Ronenn Roubenoff79
Estimated H-index: 79
SummaryAging causes loss of many of the anabolic signals to muscle that are present in young adulthood. Recent research suggests that there is also an increase in catabolic signals with age.Purpose of reviewResearch in the field of sarcopenia is evolving rapidly, and the process is now recognized as
214 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2003in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 4.16
Taina Rantanen56
Estimated H-index: 56
(University of Jyväskylä),
Stefano Volpato52
Estimated H-index: 52
(National Institutes of Health)
+ 3 AuthorsJack M. Guralnik140
Estimated H-index: 140
(National Institutes of Health)
OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between muscle strength and total and cause-specific mortality and the plausible contributing factors to this association, such as presence of diseases commonly underlying mortality, inflammation, nutritional deficiency, physical inactivity, smoking, and depression. DESIGN: Prospective population-based cohort study with mortality surveillance over 5 years. SETTING: Elderly women residing in the eastern half of Baltimore, Maryland, and part of Baltimore Coun...
419 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2003in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 4.16
A. B. Newman140
Estimated H-index: 140
(University of Pittsburgh),
Catherine L. Haggerty30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 5 AuthorsMarjolein Visser76
Estimated H-index: 76
(VU University Amsterdam)
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether lower lean mass and higher fat mass have independent effects on the loss of strength and muscle quality in older adults and might explain part of the effect of age. DESIGN: Single-episode, cross-sectional analyses of a cohort of subjects in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study. SETTING: Ambulatory clinic and research laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Two thousand six hundred twenty-three men and women aged 70 to 79 from the Health ABC Study. MEASUREM...
304 Citations Source Cite
Taina Rantanen56
Estimated H-index: 56
(University of Jyväskylä)
The aims of this review are to address (1) the role of muscle strength in the disablement process and (2) muscle strength as a predictor of length of life using data from prospective studies. Functional limitations, such as slow walking speed, predispose older people to disabilities. How much strength is needed for daily motor tasks such as walking varies according to other impairments present. For example, when postural balance is good, only minimum amount of strength is needed for walking. How...
212 Citations Source Cite
E. Jeffrey Metter67
Estimated H-index: 67
(Johns Hopkins University),
Laura A. Talbot16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Johns Hopkins University)
+ 1 AuthorsRobin A. Conwit9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Johns Hopkins University)
Low muscle strength is associated with mortality, presumably as a result of low muscle mass (sarcopenia) and physical inactivity. Grip strength was longitudinally collected in 1071 men over a 25-year period. Muscle mass was estimated by using 24-hour creatinine excretion and physical activity values, obtained by questionnaire. Survival analysis examined the impact of grip strength and rate of change in strength on all-cause mortality over 40 years. Lower and declining strength are associated wit...
520 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2002in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 6.55
Virginia A. Hughes25
Estimated H-index: 25
,
Walter R. Frontera44
Estimated H-index: 44
+ 2 AuthorsMaria A. Fiatarone Singh71
Estimated H-index: 71
Background: Estimates of body-composition change in older adults are mostly derived from cross-sectional data. Objective: We examined the natural longitudinal patterns of change in fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) in older adults and explored the effect of physical activity, weight change, and age on these changes. Design: The body composition measured by hydrodensitometry and the level of sports and recreational activity (SRA) of 53 men and 78 women with a mean (±SD) initial age of 60.7 ± ...
498 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2002in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research 2.12
Taina Rantanen56
Estimated H-index: 56
,
Kirsten Avlund43
Estimated H-index: 43
+ 3 AuthorsPertti E1
Estimated H-index: 1
182 Citations
Cited By1213
Newest
Published on Feb 14, 2019in BMC Nephrology 2.40
Yu-Li Lin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Tzu Chi University),
Shu-Yuan Chen (Tzu Chi University)+ 4 AuthorsBang-Gee Hsu15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Tzu Chi University)
Background Sarcopenia, defined as low muscle mass and strength, is highly prevalent in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis (HD). However, muscle function and muscle mass do not share the same clinical relevance. In fact, muscle strength was more closely associated with the risk of mortality in chronic HD patients than was muscle mass. Therefore, to identify the risk factors of muscle weakness is vital. Angiotensin II overexpression had been recognized to impair skeletal muscle strength. Acc...
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Published on Mar 28, 2019in BMC Nephrology 2.40
Katsuhito Mori30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Osaka City University),
Kozo Nishide (Osaka City University)+ 9 AuthorsTomoyuki Yamakawa24
Estimated H-index: 24
Background Sarcopenia has become a serious disorder in modern society. Chronic kidney disease requiring dialysis and diabetes are some of the disorders that accelerate the onset and progression of sarcopenia. We, therefore, investigated the prevalence of sarcopenia in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) and confirmed the impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on this population.
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Published on Dec 19, 2018in Archives of Osteoporosis 2.38
Cynthia El Hajj1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Institut national de la recherche agronomique),
Souha Fares4
Estimated H-index: 4
(American University of Beirut)
+ 2 AuthorsStéphane Walrand24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Institut national de la recherche agronomique)
Summary Previous studies have shown that improving vitamin D status among the elderly may lead to an improvement in muscle mass and muscle strength. In our study, vitamin D supplementation showed significant improvements in vitamin D concentrations as well as appendicular muscle mass in pre-sarcopenic older Lebanese people. However, we found no significant effect on muscle strength.
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Published on Feb 20, 2019in Scientific Reports 4.12
Hui Wang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Sichuan University),
Shan Hai5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Sichuan University)
+ 2 AuthorsBirong Dong20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Sichuan University)
This study aimed to evaluate the association between skeletal muscle mass and long-term all-cause mortality among nonagenarians and centenarians in China. We used data from the Project of Longevity and Aging in Dujiangyan (PLAD). A total of 738 community-dwelling people aged ≥ 90 years (mean age of 93.5 ± 3.2 years) were analyzed in this study. The appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) was estimated using a previously validated anthropometric equation. The information on the survival status wa...
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Published on Jun 1, 2019in Gait & Posture 2.27
Woohyoung Jeon1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Jody L. Jensen19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Lisa Griffin18
Estimated H-index: 18
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Erika D. Nolte (University of Kansas), Keith A. Nolte1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Kansas),
Shirley ShiDu Yan26
Estimated H-index: 26
(University of Kansas)
Abstract Due to the increasing focus on aging as an important risk factor for many serious diseases and an emphasis on animal models that have translational value, an increasing number of animal models are being aged. Animal behavior tests can be used to assess effects of aging in mouse models. Female mice begin exhibiting anxiety-like behaviors at 12 months of age which become more serious at 24 months, while males exhibit no age-induced anxiety-like behaviors. Males and females equally demonst...
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Published on Jun 1, 2019in Nutrition in Clinical Practice 2.59
Natália F. Pena (Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais), Sílvia Fernandes Maurício4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais)
+ 4 AuthorsSimone de Vasconcelos Generoso13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais)
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R.M.T.K. Ranathunga (Newcastle University), Tom R. Hill20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Newcastle University)
+ 4 AuthorsTerry J. Aspray14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Newcastle University)
Vitamin D plays a role in muscle function through genomic and non-genomic processes. The objective of this RCT was to determine the effect of monthly supplemental vitamin D3 onmuscle function in 70+ years old adults. Participants (n = 379) were randomized to receive, 12000 IU, 24000 IU or 48000 IU of vitamin D3 monthly for 12 months. Standardized Hand Grip Strength (GS) and Timed-Up and Go (TUG) were measured before and after vitamin D3 supplementation. Fasting total plasma 25 hydroxyvitamin D (...
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Published on May 30, 2019in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research 2.12
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Published on May 23, 2019in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research 5.15
Young Jin Jang11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Jisong Ahn + 3 AuthorsTae Youl Ha12
Estimated H-index: 12
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