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Effects of a synthetic facial pheromone on behavior of cats

Published on Oct 1, 2000in Javma-journal of The American Veterinary Medical Association 1.51
· DOI :10.2460/javma.2000.217.1154
Cerissa A. Griffith1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Elizabeth S. Steigerwald1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
C. A. Tony Buffington25
Estimated H-index: 25
Abstract
Objective—To evaluate the effects of a synthetic feline facial pheromone (FFP) on behavior and food intake of healthy versus clinically ill cats. Design—Original study. Animals—20 cats were used in each of 2 studies. In each study, 7 cats were considered healthy, and 13 cats were determined to be clinically ill. Procedure—In study 1, cats were assigned either to exposure to FFP (treated group; 4 healthy, 6 ill cats) or to exposure to the vehicle (70% ethanol solution; control group; 3 healthy, 7 ill cats). Cats were placed in a cage containing a small cotton towel that had been sprayed with FFP or vehicle 30 minutes previously. Cats were then videotaped for 125 minutes, and food intake was measured during this period. Videotapes were scored at 5-minute intervals for various behaviors. In study 2, cats were categorized in 1 of 2 groups; group 1 (2 healthy, 8 ill cats) had a cat carrier placed in their cages, and group 2 (5 healthy, 5 ill cats) did not. All cats were exposed to FFP, and 24-hour food intake ...
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  • Citations (94)
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References15
Newest
Published on Nov 30, 2013
Dennis C. Turner17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Patrick Bateson47
Estimated H-index: 47
List of contributors Part I. Introduction: 1. Why the cat? Dennis C. Turner and Patrick Bateson Part II. From Kitten to Adulthood: 2. Behavioural development in the cat Patrick Bateson 3. Normal and problematic reproductive behaviour in the domestic cat Benjamin L. Hart and Lynette A. Hart 4. Communication in the domestic cat: within and between species Sarah L. Brown and John W. S. Bradshaw Part III. Social Life and Ecology: 5. Social organization and behavioural ecology of free-ranging domesti...
341 Citations
Published on Apr 1, 1999in Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 4.12
Elizabeth S. Steigerwald1
Estimated H-index: 1
(OSU: Ohio State University),
Martin Sarter66
Estimated H-index: 66
(OSU: Ohio State University)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael Podell20
Estimated H-index: 20
(OSU: Ohio State University)
27 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1999in Applied Animal Behaviour Science 1.55
D.F Frank1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Cornell University),
Hollis N. Erb57
Estimated H-index: 57
(Cornell University),
Katherine A. Houpt39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Cornell University)
Abstract Thirty four spraying cats, belonging to 24 households, had a complete physical examination, CBC, blood biochemistry panel, urinalysis, urine culture, urine cortisol:creatinine analysis and abdominal radiographs. Diagnostic procedures revealed some abnormalities and/or crystalluria in 13 patients (38%). Seven (20%) of these cats had medical conditions involving the urogenital system (renal calculi, renal failure, cystic calculi, bacterial urinary infection or cystitis associated with the...
52 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1997in Journal of Animal Science 1.71
Temple Grandin43
Estimated H-index: 43
(CSU: Colorado State University)
Fear is a very strong stressor, and the highly variable results of handling and transportation studies are likely to be due to different levels of psychological stress. Psychological stress is fear stress. Some examples are restraint, contact wi th people, or exposure to novelty. In many different animals, stimulation of the amygdala with an implanted electrode triggers a complex pattern of behavior and autonomic responses that resemble fear in humans. Both previous experience and genetic factor...
640 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 15, 1995
David S. Goldstein6
Estimated H-index: 6
144 Citations
Published on Nov 1, 1993in Applied Animal Behaviour Science 1.55
Kathy Carlstead19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Smithsonian Institution),
Janine L. Brown46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Smithsonian Institution),
William Strawn1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NIH: National Institutes of Health)
Abstract Sixteen domestic cats were used to investigate the pituitary-adrenal, pituitary-gonadal and behavioral consequences of an unpredictable handling and husbandry routine. After a 10-day baseline period of standard laboratory procedures, eight cats (‘stressed cats’, STR) were subjected to a 21-day period of altered caretaking characterized by irregular feeding and cleaning times, absence of talking and petting by humans, and daily unpredictable manipulations. Eight control cats (CON group) ...
217 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1992
Herbert Weiner1
Estimated H-index: 1
The concept of stress pervades modern society, with relief from it promised on everything from vitamin to vacation packages. Yet there exists no generally accepted classification of stressful experience, nor is the concept itself universally considered a valid subject for research. This authoritative work is the first to analyze critically the entire range of research and theory on stress in animals and humans, from the earliest studies in the 1930s up to the present day. Herbert Weiner not only...
216 Citations
Published on Aug 1, 1986in Animal Behaviour 3.07
Julie Feaver3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Cambridge),
Michael Mendl44
Estimated H-index: 44
(University of Cambridge),
Patrick Bateson47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Cambridge)
Abstract Fourteen adult female domestic cats were watched by two observers for 3 months. Ratings of 18 aspects of each cat's behavioural style were obtained independently from each observer. Correlations between observers were statistically significant for 15 of the 18 aspects and seven of the correlation coefficients were greater than 0·7. The ratings were compared with results of direct recording methods, where equivalent measures were available and, in five out of six cases, the results of th...
148 Citations Source Cite
Cited By94
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 1.47
Debra F Horwitz2
Estimated H-index: 2
Practical relevance:Urine spraying (synonymous terms include urine marking or scent marking) is commonly described as urine deposited on vertical surfaces while the cat is in a standing position. With the increasing trend of keeping cats indoors in some countries and the potential resultant increase in frustration-related behaviors, urine spraying may occur in the home. Although also a normal feline behavior, it is usually not deemed acceptable when the cat targets household possessions. Urine s...
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Published on Nov 1, 2018in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 1.47
Emma K. Grigg3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Lori R. Kogan17
Estimated H-index: 17
(CSU: Colorado State University)
+ 1 AuthorsCheryl Kolus1
Estimated H-index: 1
ObjectivesThis study assessed cat owners’ perceptions of the use of psychoactive medications and alternative products for the treatment of behavioral problems in their cats. Factors that potentially impact these perceptions were explored and discussed.MethodsAn online, anonymous, cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess US-based cat owners’ experience with behavior problems of their cats, familiarity with psychoactive medications for treatment of behavior problems and comfort levels using ...
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Published on Sep 1, 2018in Applied Animal Behaviour Science 1.55
Lydia Pratsch1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Natalia Mohr1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 3 AuthorsChristine Arhant4
Estimated H-index: 4
Abstract Transport to and visiting a veterinary practice frequently is stressful for cats and their owners. Handling a fearful cat can be a challenge for the veterinary team and stress can influence physiological parameters. This study investigated whether carrier training reduced stress during a 10 min transport by car and increased compliance during the veterinary examination. A blinded randomized controlled trial with a paired sample design (training group (TG): N = 11; control group (CG): N ...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Applied Animal Behaviour Science 1.55
Ragen T.S. McGowan4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Nestlé),
Jacklyn Jaye Ellis1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Nestlé)
+ 1 AuthorsFrançois Martin4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Nestlé)
Abstract Few studies have sought to describe cat elimination behavior in detail and much of the information presently available focuses on factors that potentially cause cats to reject a litter box. Thus, the ethograms published in the current veterinary and scientific literature largely focus on macro behaviors (e.g., enter box, dig, squat, cover, and exit box) and lack the detail necessary to make distinctions between types of litter box experiences for cats. To facilitate our understanding of...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 25, 2017
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Published on Aug 25, 2017
Brenda Griffin1
Estimated H-index: 1
6 Citations Source Cite
Robin M. Chadwin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Melissa J. Bain9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Philip H. Kass53
Estimated H-index: 53
OBJECTIVE To determine whether a synthetic feline facial pheromone product would decrease stress scores and upper respiratory tract infection (URI) incidence in shelter-housed cats. DESIGN Randomized controlled clinical trial. ANIMALS 336 stray, feral, owner-relinquished, or legally impounded cats at 2 animal shelters in northern California. PROCEDURES 5 cat holding rooms (3 at shelter A and 2 at shelter B) were used. A diffuser containing either synthetic pheromone or placebo was randomly assig...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 6, 2017
Valarie V. Tynes1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Leslie Sinn2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Northern Virginia Community College),
Colleen S. Koch1
Estimated H-index: 1
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 1.47
Laura Mc Conti1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Tatiana Champion1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Sewanee: The University of the South)
+ 6 AuthorsViviane Raposo Fortunato1
Estimated H-index: 1
ObjectivesThis study assessed behavioral and physiologic stress parameters in cats placed in two environments: home and the veterinary hospital. With a widely used scale, several parameters were assessed, including respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), vagosympathetic responses using calculated intervals (heart rate variability [HRV]10, HRV20 and vasovagal tonus index [VVTI]) and ‘stress attitude’, such as struggling, vocalization and agitation during handling. I...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Veterinary Nursing Journal
Mary Ellen Goldberg1
Estimated H-index: 1
AbstractChronic pain is subtle and more difficult to recognise in both dog and cat patients. As veterinary nurses, we need to recognise both signs of chronic and neuropathic pain. Low-stress handling techniques should be employed with cats to reduce pain and distress that could exacerbate a pain state. While not many validated chronic pain scales are available for cats, assessment and recognition of feline chronic pain has been well described. Feline chronic pain conditions can be degenerative j...
1 Citations Source Cite