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Blunted neural response to rewards prospectively predicts depression in adolescent girls

Published on Jan 1, 2013in Psychophysiology3.378
· DOI :10.1111/j.1469-8986.2012.01485.x
Jennifer N. Bress10
Estimated H-index: 10
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Dan Foti28
Estimated H-index: 28
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 2 AuthorsGreg Hajcak71
Estimated H-index: 71
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Abstract
The prevalence of depression increases substantially during adolescence. Several predictors of major depressive disorder have been established, but their predictive power is limited. In the current study, the feedback negativity (FN), an event-related potential component elicited by feedback indicating monetary gain versus loss, was recorded in 68 never-depressed adolescent girls. Over the following 2 years, 24% of participants developed a major depressive episode (MDE); illness onset was predicted by blunted FN at initial evaluation. Lower FN amplitude predicted more depressive symptoms during the follow-up period, even after controlling for neuroticism and depressive symptoms at baseline. This is the first prospective study to demonstrate a link between a neural measure of reward sensitivity and the first onset of an MDE. The current results suggest that low reward sensitivity may be an important factor in the development of depression. Descriptors: Reward, Depression, Feedback negativity, Feedback-related negativity, Predictors
  • References (41)
  • Citations (125)
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References41
Newest
#1Dan Foti (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 28
#2Anna Weinberg (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 29
Last. Greg Hajcak (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 71
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#1Joshua M. Carlson (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 20
#2Dan Foti (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 28
Last. Greg Hajcak (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 71
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#1Dan Foti (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 28
#2Roman Kotov (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 41
Last. Greg Hajcak (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 71
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Major depressive disorder aggregates within families, although the mechanisms of transfer across generations are not well understood. In light of converging biological and behavioral evidence that depressive symptoms are associated with impaired reward processing, we examined whether adolescent girls with a parental history of depression would also exhibit abnormal reward sensitivity. We performed a negative mood induction and then recorded the feedback negativity, a neural index of reward proce...
54 CitationsSource
#1Edward M. Bernat (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 32
#2Lindsay D. Nelson (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 21
Last. Christopher J. Patrick (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 73
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Externalizing is a broad construct that reflects propensity toward a variety of impulse control problems, including antisocial personality disorder and substance use disorders. Two event-related potential responses known to be reduced among individuals high in externalizing proneness are the P300, which reflects postperceptual processing of a stimulus, and the error-related negativity (ERN), which indexes performance monitoring based on endogenous representations. In the current study, the autho...
91 CitationsSource
#1Ian H. Gotlib (Stanford University)H-Index: 104
#2J. Paul Hamilton (Stanford University)H-Index: 21
Last. Jutta JoormannH-Index: 55
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Context Deficits in reward processing and their neural correlates have been associated with major depression. However, it is unclear if these deficits precede the onset of depression or are a consequence of this disorder. Objective To determine whether anomalous neural processing of reward characterizes children at familial risk for depression in the absence of a personal history of diagnosable disorder. Design Comparison of neural activity among children at low and high risk for depression as t...
200 CitationsSource
#1Dan Foti (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 28
#2Greg HajcakH-Index: 71
Both behavioral and neural evidence suggests that depression is associated with reduced sensitivity to rewards. Using the feedback negativity, a neural index of reward processing, an earlier study showed that depressive symptoms experienced over the previous week were associated with less differentiation between nonrewards and rewards in a gambling task. To directly test whether variability in state mood related to similar effects on neural correlates of reward, this study recorded the feedback ...
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#1Daniel N. Klein (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 77
#2Stewart A. ShankmanH-Index: 27
Last. John R. Seeley (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 82
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Abstract Objectives Subthreshold depressive disorder is one of the best established risk factors for the onset of full-syndrome depressive disorders. However, many youths with subthreshold depressive disorder do not develop full-syndrome depression. We examined predictors of escalation to full-syndrome depressive disorders in a community sample of 225 adolescents with subthreshold depressive disorder. Method Criteria for subthreshold depressive disorder were an episode of depressed mood or loss ...
104 CitationsSource
#1Diego A. Pizzagalli (Harvard University)H-Index: 61
#2Avram J. Holmes (Harvard University)H-Index: 39
Last. Maurizio FavaH-Index: 109
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Objective: Major depressive disorder is characterized by impaired reward processing, possibly due to dysfunction in the basal ganglia. However, few neuroimaging studies of depression have distinguished between anticipatory and consummatory phases of reward processing. Using functional MRI (fMRI) and a task that dissociates anticipatory and consummatory phases of reward processing, the authors tested the hypothesis that individuals with major depression would show reduced reward-related responses...
631 CitationsSource
#1Dan Foti (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 28
#2Greg Hajcak (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 71
Depression has been characterized in recent years in terms of deficits in positive affect and an underactive approach-related motivational system. Consistent with this view, behavioral and electrocortical studies suggest that reduced sensitivity to rewards may be a fundamental feature of depression. Within the event-related potential literature, the feedback negativity (FN) has been identified as a component that is sensitive to feedback indicating non-rewards versus rewards, and has been linked...
174 CitationsSource
#1Pim CuijpersH-Index: 110
Last. Amy BeekmanH-Index: 82
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Objective: A growing number of studies have tested the efficacy of preventive interventions in reducing the incidence of depressive disorders. Until now, no meta-analysis has integrated the results of these studies. Method: The authors conducted a meta-analysis. After a comprehensive literature search, 19 studies were identified that met inclusion criteria. The studies had to be randomized controlled studies in which the incidence of depressive disorders (based on diagnostic criteria) in an expe...
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Cited By125
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#1Kean J. Hsu (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 9
#2Mary E. McNamara (University of Texas at Austin)
Last. Christopher G. Beevers (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 39
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BACKGROUND Individual differences in reward-related processes, such as reward responsivity and approach motivation, appear to play a role in the nature and course of depression. Prior work suggests that cognitive biases for valenced information may contribute to these reward processes. Yet there is little work examining how biased attention, processing, and memory for positively and negatively valenced information may be associated with reward-related processes in samples with depression symptom...
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#1Dylan M. Nielson (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 8
#2Hanna Keren (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 3
Last. Lisa S. Gorham (NIH: National Institutes of Health)
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Abstract Both human and animal studies support the relationship between depression and reward processing abnormalities, giving rise to the expectation that neural signals of these processes may serve as biomarkers or mechanistic treatment targets. Given the great promise of this research line, we scrutinize those findings and the theoretical claims that underlie them. To achieve this, we apply the framework provided by classical work on causality as well as contemporary approaches to prediction....
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#1Autumn Kujawa (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 24
#2Daniel N. Klein (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 77
Last. Anna Weinberg (McGill University)H-Index: 29
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Abstract Reduced activation of positive valence systems (PVS), including blunted neural and physiological responses to pleasant stimuli and rewards, has been shown to prospectively predict the development of psychopathology. Yet, little is known about how reduced PVS activation emerges across development or what implications it has for prevention. We review genetic, temperament, parenting, and naturalistic and laboratory stress research on neural measures of PVS and outline developmentally-infor...
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#1Austin J. Gallyer (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 2
#2Kreshnik Burani (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 3
Last. Greg Hajcak (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 71
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A recent study by Tsypes, Owens, and Gibb (2019) found that children with recent suicidal ideation had blunted neural reward processing, as measured by the reward positivity (RewP), compared to matched controls, and that this difference was driven by reduced neural responses to monetary loss, rather than blunted neural response to monetary reward. Here, we aimed to conceptually replicate and extend these findings in two large samples of children and adolescents (n = 275 and n = 235). Results fro...
Source
#1Wenhai ZhangH-Index: 3
Last. Hong LiH-Index: 29
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Background: Neuroimaging research has determined deficits in the dopaminergic circuit of major depressive disorder (MDD) during adolescence. This study investigated how emotional contexts modulate the temporal dynamics of reward anticipation and feedback in adolescents. Methods: EEG data from 35 MDD and 37 healthy adolescents were recorded when they conducted a gambling task after being presented with emotional pictures. Results: The results demonstrated that both MDD and healthy adolescents exh...
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#1Avery B. Albert (State University of New York Upstate Medical University)H-Index: 1
#1Avery B. AlbertH-Index: 1
Last. Stephen J. Glatt (State University of New York Upstate Medical University)H-Index: 44
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Abstract The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) established a dimensional framework for understanding psychiatric constructs. Initial Responsiveness to Reward Attainment (IRRA) was identified as a dimensional construct relevant to several psychiatric disorders. The current study aimed to (1) examine IRRA as a predictor of psychopathology and impairment in children and their parents, and (2) examine the potential effects of sex and ancestr...
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#1Peter E. Clayson (USF: University of South Florida)H-Index: 20
#2Kaylie A. Carbine (BYU: Brigham Young University)H-Index: 7
Last. Michael J. Larson (BYU: Brigham Young University)H-Index: 36
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Abstract Performance-monitoring event-related brain potentials (ERPs), such as the error-related negativity (ERN) and reward positivity (RewP), are advocated as biomarkers of depression symptoms and risk. However, a recent meta-analysis indicated effect size heterogeneity in the ERN and RewP literatures. Hence, advocating these ERPs as biomarkers of depression might be premature or possibly misguided due to the selective reporting of significant analyses on the part of researchers (e.g., p-hacki...
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#2Hong-Ying Zhang (NUS: National University of Singapore)H-Index: 26
Last. Anqi Qiu (NUS: National University of Singapore)H-Index: 38
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: Maternal depression is associated with disrupted neurodevelopment in offspring. This study examined relationships among postnatal maternal depressive symptoms, the functional reward network and behavioral problems in 4.5-year-old boys (57) and girls (65). We employed canonical correlation analysis to evaluate whether the resting-state functional connectivity within a reward network, identified through an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of fMRI studies, was associated with ...
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#1Dylan M. Nielson (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 8
#2Hanna Keren (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 3
Last. Lisa S. Gorham (NIH: National Institutes of Health)
view all 13 authors...
Both human and animal studies support the relationship between depression and reward processing abnormalities, giving rise to the expectation that neural signals of these processes may serve as biomarkers or mechanistic treatment targets. Given the great promise of this research line, we scrutinize those findings and the theoretical claims that underlie them. To achieve this, we apply the framework provided by classical work on causality as well as contemporary approaches to prediction. We ident...
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#1Fabien DucrocqH-Index: 2
#2Roman WalleH-Index: 2
Last. Pierre TrifilieffH-Index: 20
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Summary Reward-processing impairment is a common symptomatic dimension of several psychiatric disorders. However, whether the underlying pathological mechanisms are common is unknown. Herein, we asked if the decrease in the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) lipid species, consistently described in these pathologies, could underlie reward-processing deficits. We show that reduced n-3 PUFA biostatus in mice leads to selective motivational impairments. Electrophysiological recordings revealed i...
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