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A content analytic comparison of fitspiration and thinspiration websites

Published on Jan 1, 2016in International Journal of Eating Disorders3.52
· DOI :10.1002/eat.22403
Leah Boepple3
Estimated H-index: 3
(USF: University of South Florida),
J. Kevin Thompson70
Estimated H-index: 70
(USF: University of South Florida)
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Abstract
Objective “Pro-ana” or Thinspiration websites are internet sites that support weight loss and eating disorders. Fitspiration websites are a newer type of site that supposedly advocates a fit and healthy lifestyle. Method The first 10 images from a sample of 50 Fitspiration and 50 Thinspiration websites, chosen using a standard internet search protocol, were rated on a variety of weight, eating, and appearance characteristics. χ2 analyses were conducted to compare website content. Results Thinspiration sites featured more content related to losing weight or fat, praising thinness, showng a thin pose, and providing food guilt messages than Fitspiration sites. However, sites did not differ on guilt-inducing messages regarding weight or the body, fat/weight stigmatization, the presence of objectifying phrases, and dieting/restraint messages. Overall, 88% of Thinspiration sites and 80% of Fitspiration sites contained one or more of the coded variables. Discussion Prior research has examined Thinspiration websites and noted the potentially hazardous messages contained on these sites. This content analysis indicates that sites supposedly devoted to healthy pursuits (fitness) may also contain thematically similar content. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:98–101)
  • References (11)
  • Citations (57)
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References11
Newest
Published on May 1, 2014in International Journal of Eating Disorders3.52
Leah Boepple3
Estimated H-index: 3
(USF: University of South Florida),
Joel K. Thompson28
Estimated H-index: 28
(USF: University of South Florida)
Objective “Healthy” living blogs are a recent addition to internet media that offer advice on improving physical and mental health. Often, these sites include information on eating, exercise, and self-image. This study was a content analysis designed to evaluate the information included on these sites. Method A sample of 21 blogs was selected from a larger sample for evaluation. These blogs were chosen based on two criteria: they had won an award for healthy blogs and they had a large number of ...
Published on Dec 1, 2012in Eating Behaviors2.18
Carrie E. Bair2
Estimated H-index: 2
(VCU: Virginia Commonwealth University),
Nichole R. Kelly14
Estimated H-index: 14
(VCU: Virginia Commonwealth University)
+ 1 AuthorsSuzanne E. Mazzeo30
Estimated H-index: 30
(VCU: Virginia Commonwealth University)
Abstract Research has identified a relation between exposure to thin-ideal magazine and television media images and eating disorder pathology. However, few studies have examined the potential influence of Internet media on eating disorder behaviors and attitudes. This study investigated associations among image-focused media exposure, body dissatisfaction, eating pathology and thin-ideal internalization in a sample of 421 female undergraduates. Undergraduate women spent significantly more time v...
Published on Jan 1, 2011in Body Image3.12
Mallory Hussin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(USF: University of South Florida),
Savannah Frazier1
Estimated H-index: 1
(USF: University of South Florida),
J. Kevin Thompson70
Estimated H-index: 70
(USF: University of South Florida)
Abstract YouTube.com is an internet website that is viewed by two billion individuals daily, and thus may serve as the source of images and messages regarding weight acceptance or weight bias. In the current study, a targeted sample of YouTube videos that displayed fat stigmatization were content rated on a variety of video characteristics. The findings revealed that men were the target of fat stigmatization (62.1%) almost twice as often as women (36.4%). When there was an antagonist present in ...
Published on Aug 1, 2010in American Journal of Public Health5.38
Dina L. G. Borzekowski25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Johns Hopkins University),
Summer Schenk1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Johns Hopkins University)
+ 1 AuthorsRebecka Peebles14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Stanford University)
Objectives. The Internet offers Web sites that describe, endorse, and support eating disorders. We examined the features of pro–eating disorder Web sites and the messages to which users may be exposed.Methods. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 180 active Web sites, noting site logistics, site accessories, “thinspiration” material (images and prose intended to inspire weight loss), tips and tricks, recovery, themes, and perceived harm.Results. Practically all (91%) of the Web sites we...
Published on Jul 1, 2010in Sex Roles2.28
Marika Tiggemann74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Flinders University),
Jessica Miller2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Flinders University)
The primary aim of the study was to examine the relationship between media exposure and body image in adolescent girls, with a particular focus on the ‘new’ and as yet unstudied medium of the Internet. A sample of 156 Australian female high school students (mean age = 14.9 years) completed questionnaire measures of media consumption and body image. Internet appearance exposure and magazine reading, but not television exposure, were found to be correlated with greater internalization of thin idea...
Published on Jun 1, 2010in Body Image3.12
Kristin J. Homan10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Grove City College)
Abstract Although internalization of the thin ideal has been extensively researched and is now regarded as a risk factor for eating disturbance, endorsement of the firm, athletic body ideal has received only minimal attention. This short-term longitudinal study explored whether internalization of two aspects of the current cultural ideal (thinness and athleticism) prospectively predicted three potentially deleterious outcomes: body dissatisfaction, dieting, and compulsive exercise. Undergraduate...
Published on Mar 23, 2010in Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research
Catherine M. Sabiston36
Estimated H-index: 36
(McGill University),
Krista Chandler1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U of W: University of Windsor)
The effects of exposure to fitness advertising on multiple dimensions of female body image were explored. Healthy weight females (N = 185) were randomly assigned to a model-focused, product-focused, or control group and completed body image inventories during a pre-test and following exposure to fitness advertising 1 week later. There were no significant main effects for group or time on any body image measures. A group by time interaction was observed for affective body image, F(1, 179) = 45.52...
Published on Sep 1, 2007in International Journal of Eating Disorders3.52
Anna M. Bardone-Cone23
Estimated H-index: 23
(MU: University of Missouri),
Kamila M. Cass3
Estimated H-index: 3
(MU: University of Missouri)
Objective: This study experimentally examined the effects of viewing a pro-anorexia website. Method: Following construction of a prototypic pro-anorexia website, 235 female undergraduates were randomly assigned to view either the pro-anorexia website or one of two comparison websites related to female fashion (using average-sized models) or home decor. Post-website affect, cognitions, and behavioral expectations were examined along with moderator effects. Results: Study participants exposed to t...
Published on Jan 1, 2004in Eating Disorders1.35
Sylvia Herbozo11
Estimated H-index: 11
(USF: University of South Florida),
Stacey Tantleff-Dunn23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UCF: University of Central Florida)
+ 1 AuthorsJ. Kevin Thompson70
Estimated H-index: 70
(USF: University of South Florida)
Research suggests that young children have body image concerns, such as a desire for thinness and an avoidance of obesity. Surprisingly, few studies have investigated how children's body preferences and stereotypes are influenced by media aimed at children. In order to gain a better understanding of the content of such media, a content analysis was used to examine body image-related messages in popular children's videos and books. Results indicated that messages emphasizing the importance of phy...
Published on Jan 1, 2002in International Journal of Eating Disorders3.52
Lisa M. Groesz1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Kenyon College),
Michael P. Levine30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Kenyon College),
Sarah K. Murnen24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Kenyon College)
Objective The effect of experimental manipulations of the thin beauty ideal, as portrayed in the mass media, on female body image was evaluated using meta-analysis. Method Data from 25 studies (43 effect sizes) were used to examine the main effect of mass media images of the slender ideal, as well as the moderating effects of pre-existing body image problems, the age of the participants, the number of stimulus presentations, and the type of research design. Results Body image was significantly m...
Cited By57
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2019in Body Image3.12
Scott Griffiths14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Melbourne),
Ashleigh Stefanovski (University of Melbourne)
Abstract We used experience sampling to examine thinspiration and fitspiration in the everyday lives of women and men. Undergraduates ( N = 108, 21% men) completed a 1-week smartphone-facilitated experience sampling protocol containing self-report measures of thinspiration and fitspiration exposure, body satisfaction, and affective functioning. Multi-level, gender-adjusted models examined the unique and interactive associations of exposure to thinspiration and fitspiration. Women reported a week...
Beth T. Bell6
Estimated H-index: 6
(York St John University),
Nova Deighton-Smith1
Estimated H-index: 1
(LBU: Leeds Beckett University),
Megan Hurst3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Sussex)
Adolescents access information about fitness, including content labelled as #fitspiration, through social media. Seventy-seven adolescents (M age = 12.49; SD = 0.55; Girls = 27) participated in semi-structured focus groups to explore their perspectives on #fitspiration and fitness more broadly. Through inductive thematic analysis, four themes were developed: (1) Fitness enhances physical function and appearance, but these are not always linked, (2) Fitness is transformative but requires hard wor...
Published on Jun 13, 2019in Journal of Health Psychology2.26
Priyanjali Ratwatte (UCB: University of Buckingham), Emily Mattacola (UCB: University of Buckingham)
The ‘Fitspiration’ movement may endorse problematic body image and behaviour. This study aims to expand the understanding of ‘fitspiration’ by examining its presence on YouTube. Analysis was conduc...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Body Image3.12
Rachel Cohen3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney),
Lauren Irwin3
Estimated H-index: 3
(USYD: University of Sydney)
+ 1 AuthorsAmy Slater21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of the West of England)
Abstract In the last decade, the body image literature has begun to extend beyond a primary focus on body image disturbances and examine the construct of positive body image. Similarly, “Body positivity” is a growing social media trend that seeks to challenge dominant societal appearance ideals and promote acceptance and appreciation of all bodies and appearances. The present study provides a content analysis of body positive posts on Instagram. A set of 640 Instagram posts sampled from popular ...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Discourse & Communication0.98
Karyn Stapleton9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Sarah L Evans , Catrin S. Rhys4
Estimated H-index: 4
Pro-anorexia (pro-ana) is an Internet-based movement that provides advice and support for the development/maintenance of an eating disorder (ED). The movement is sometimes framed as a religion, wit...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Journal of Health Psychology2.26
Sara Santarossa2
Estimated H-index: 2
(U of W: University of Windsor),
Paige Coyne1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U of W: University of Windsor)
+ 1 AuthorsSarah J. Woodruff9
Estimated H-index: 9
(U of W: University of Windsor)
The #fitspo ‘tag’ is a recent trend on Instagram, which is used on posts to motivate others towards a healthy lifestyle through exercise/eating habits. This study used a mixed-methods approach consisting of text and network analysis via the Netlytic program (N = 10,000 #fitspo posts), and content analysis of #fitspo images (N = 122) was used to examine author and image characteristics. Results suggest that #fitspo posts may motivate through appearance-mediated themes, as the largest content cate...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Social Theory and Health0.74
Alexandra Rodney3
Estimated H-index: 3
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Healthy living blogs are ideal sites to analyze how biopedagogy (the teaching of body regulation) operates through social media produced by everyday people. Drawing from a theoretical framework grounded in neoliberal governmentality, biopower, and individualization, this paper endeavors to understand how healthy living blogs function as pedagogical sites where body management is taught. To address this question, the food discourse on 459 healthy living blog posts, written by highly successful an...
Published on Jan 28, 2019in Psychology of popular media culture
Jessica Gall Myrick11
Estimated H-index: 11
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Sara Erlichman (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
Published on Jan 1, 2019in New Media & Society4.80
Scott J. Fatt1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNSW: University of New South Wales),
Jasmine Fardouly9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Ronald M. Rapee75
Estimated H-index: 75
Exposure to fitspiration content via social media can influence women’s body satisfaction and exercise inspiration, but fitspiration exposure has not been investigated in men. This study examined links between the frequency of viewing fitspiration content on Instagram, and men’s body satisfaction, appearance-based exercise motivation and health-based exercise motivation, and whether those relationships were mediated by muscular-ideal internalisation and/or appearance comparison tendency. Partici...