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Spectral reflectance indices as a potential indirect selection criteria for wheat yield under irrigation

Published on Jan 1, 2006in Crop Science1.64
· DOI :10.2135/cropsci2005.0059
M. A. Babar4
Estimated H-index: 4
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater),
Matthew P. Reynolds61
Estimated H-index: 61
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center)
+ 3 AuthorsM. L. Stone27
Estimated H-index: 27
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater)
Cite
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to assess the potential of using spectral reflectance indices (SRI) as an indirect selection tool to differentiate spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes for grain yield under irrigated conditions. This paper demonstrates only the first step in using the SRI as indirect selection criteria by reporting genetic variation for SRI among genotypes, the effect of phenology and year on SRI and their interaction with genotypes, and the correlations between SRI and grain yield and yield components of wheat. Three field experiments—15 CIMMYT globally adapted genotypes (GHIST), 25 random F3–derived lines (RLs1), and 36 random F3–derived lines (RLs2)—were conducted under irrigated conditions at the CIMMYT research station in northwest Mexico in three different years. Five previously developed SRI (photochemical reflectance index [PRI], water index [WI], red normalized difference vegetation index [RNDVI], green normalized difference vegetation index [GNDVI], simple ratio [SR]) and two newly calculated SRI (normalized water index-1 [NWI-1] and normalized water index-2 [NWI-2]) were evaluated in the experiments. In general, genotypic variation for all the indices was significant. Near infrared radiation (NIR)–based indices (WI, NWI-1, NWI-2) gave the highest levels of association with grain yield during the 3 yr of the study. A clear trend for higher association between grain yield and the NIR-based indices was observed at heading and grainfilling than at booting. Overall, NIR-based indices were more consistent and differentiated grain yield more effectively compared to the other indices. The results demonstrated the potential of using SRI as a tool in breeding programs for selecting for increased genetic gains for yield.
  • References (38)
  • Citations (98)
Cite
References38
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2003in International Journal of Remote Sensing2.49
N. Aparicio13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
D. Villegas27
Estimated H-index: 27
+ 2 AuthorsJ. L. Araus15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Barcelona)
Early prediction of crop yield can be an important tool for identifying promising genotypes in breeding programmes. To assess whether measurements of canopy reflectance at given stages of development could be used for yield forecasting and to identify the most appropriate indices, locations and growth stages for durum wheat yield assessment, nine field experiments, each including 20 or 25 durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var durum) genotypes, were carried out under a wide range of Mediterranean...
Published on Jan 1, 2002in Crop Science1.64
N. Aparicio13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
D. Villegas27
Estimated H-index: 27
+ 2 AuthorsC. Royo34
Estimated H-index: 34
Future wheat yield improvements may be gained by increasing total dry matter (TDM) production. Vegetation indices (VI) based on spectral reflectance ratios have been proposed as an appropriate method to assess TDM and leaf area index (LAI) in wheat. This study was undertaken to determine whether VI could accurately identify TDM and LAI in durum wheat [Triticum turgidum var. durum (Desf.) Bowden [= T. turgidum subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.]) and serve as indirect selection criteria in breeding progr...
Published on Jan 1, 2002in Crop Science1.64
Shannon L. Osborne16
Estimated H-index: 16
(ARS: Agricultural Research Service),
James S. Schepers34
Estimated H-index: 34
(NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael R. Schlemmer9
Estimated H-index: 9
(NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)
Current technologies for measuring plant water status are limited, while recently remote sensing techniques for estimating N status have increased with limited research on the interaction between the two stresses. Because plant water status methods are time-consuming and require numerous observations to characterize a field, managers could benefit from remote sensing techniques to assist in irrigation and N management decisions. A 2-yr experiment was initiated to determine specific wavelengths a...
Published on Jan 1, 2001in Agronomy Journal1.80
B. L. Ma8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
L. M. Dwyer29
Estimated H-index: 29
+ 2 AuthorsMalcolm J. Morrison18
Estimated H-index: 18
Remote-sensing techniques, in particular, multispectral visible and infrared (IR) reflectance, can provide Correlations between plant canopy reflectance and aboveground an instantaneous, nondestructive, and quantitative asbiomass can possibly be used for early prediction of crop yield. Field experiments were conducted in 1998 and 1999 on two soil types to sessment of the crop’s ability to intercept radiation and assess whether measurements of canopy reflectance at given stages photosynthesize (M...
Published on Jan 1, 2001in Agronomy Journal1.80
W. R. Raun42
Estimated H-index: 42
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater),
John B. Solie27
Estimated H-index: 27
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater)
+ 4 AuthorsJames S. Schepers15
Estimated H-index: 15
(ARS: Agricultural Research Service)
Nitrogen fertilization rates in cereal production systems are generally determined by subtracting soil test N from a specified N requirement based on the grain yield goal, which represents the best achievable grain yield in the last 4 to 5 yr. If grain yield could be predicted in season, topdress N rates could be adjusted based on projected N removal. Our study was conducted to determine if the potential grain yield of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) could be predicted using in-season spectr...
Published on Jan 1, 2001
Matthew P. Reynolds61
Estimated H-index: 61
,
I. Ortiz-Monasterio1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
A. McNab1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Jan 1, 2000in Agronomy Journal1.80
N. Aparicio13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
D. Villegas27
Estimated H-index: 27
+ 2 AuthorsC. Royo34
Estimated H-index: 34
Remote sensing measurements may be a useful tool for quantifying crop development and yield. Our objective was to study the potential of using spectral reflectance indices to provide accurate and nondestructive estimates of physiological traits determining yield in durum wheat [Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.]. Twenty-five genotypes were grown Under rainfed and irrigated conditions in northeastern Spain. Reflectance from the vegetation at different growth stages was measured and ...
Published on Jan 1, 1999in Crop Science1.64
Matthew P. Reynolds61
Estimated H-index: 61
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center),
S. Rajaram38
Estimated H-index: 38
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center),
K.D. Sayre29
Estimated H-index: 29
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center)
Published on Jan 1, 1998in Crop Science1.64
R. A. Fischer1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
D. Rees19
Estimated H-index: 19
+ 3 AuthorsA. Larque Saavedra1
Estimated H-index: 1
Grain yields of eight representative semidwarf spring wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars released in northwest Mexico between 1962 and 1988 have increased linearly across years as measured in this region during 6 yr under favorable management and irrigation. To understand the physiological basis of this progress and possibly assist future selection for grain yield, leaf traits were determined during 3 yr in the same study. Stomatal conductance (g s ), maximum photosynthetic rate (A max ), a...
Published on Jun 1, 1997in Field Crops Research3.87
Daniel F. Calderini30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UBA: University of Buenos Aires),
María F. Dreccer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UBA: University of Buenos Aires),
Gustavo A. Slafer58
Estimated H-index: 58
(UBA: University of Buenos Aires)
Abstract Field experiments were conducted during 1991 and 1992 to identify the effect of wheat breeding on crop biomass production and its physiological determinants, i.e. radiation interception and radiation-use efficiency. To address this objective, biomass accumulation and its physiological attributes of seven cultivars (including a commercial hybrid) released between 1920 and 1990 were compared in fertilised and irrigated plots. Weeds, pests, diseases and lodging were controlled or prevented...
Cited By98
Newest
Published on Sep 17, 2019in International Journal of Remote Sensing2.49
Sarah Olanrewaju (A&M: Texas A&M University), Nithya Rajan13
Estimated H-index: 13
(A&M: Texas A&M University)
+ 5 AuthorsQingwu Xue18
Estimated H-index: 18
(A&M: Texas A&M University)
Monitoring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) performance throughout the growing season provides information on productivity and yield potential. Remote sensing tools have provided easy and quick measurements without destructive sampling. The objective of this study was to evaluate genetic variability in growth and performance of 20 wheat genotypes under two water regimes (rainfed and irrigated), using spectral vegetation indices (SVI) estimated from aerial imagery and percentage ground cover (%GC) es...
Published on 2019in Journal of Crop Improvement
Sushil Thapa3
Estimated H-index: 3
(A&M: Texas A&M University),
Jackie C. Rudd16
Estimated H-index: 16
(A&M: Texas A&M University)
+ 7 AuthorsShannon Baker1
Estimated H-index: 1
(A&M: Texas A&M University)
Published on 2019in International Journal of Remote Sensing2.49
Li He (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences), Ainong Li12
Estimated H-index: 12
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Xi Nan5
Estimated H-index: 5
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
ABSTRACTHyperspectral remote sensing is economical and fast, and it can reveal detailed spectral information of plants. Hence, hyperspectral data are used in this study to analyse the spectral anom...
Published on 2019in Remote Sensing4.12
Marlena Kycko3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Elżbieta Romanowska15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Bogdan Zagajewski7
Estimated H-index: 7
Kyle Parmley1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Iowa State University),
Koushik Nagasubramanian2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Iowa State University)
+ 2 AuthorsAsheesh K. Singh18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Iowa State University)
The rate of advancement made in phenomic-assisted breeding methodologies has lagged those of genomic-assisted techniques, which is now a critical component of mainstream cultivar development pipelines. However, advancements made in phenotyping technologies have empowered plant scientists with affordable high-dimensional datasets to optimize the operational efficiencies of breeding programs. Phenomic and seed yield data was collected across six environments for a panel of 292 soybean accessions w...
Published on May 31, 2019in Agronomy
Salima Yousfi7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Adrian Gracia-Romero2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 5 AuthorsMaria Dolores Serret11
Estimated H-index: 11
Vegetation indices and canopy temperature are the most usual remote sensing approaches to assess cereal performance. Understanding the relationships of these parameters and yield may help design more efficient strategies to monitor crop performance. We present an evaluation of vegetation indices (derived from RGB images and multispectral data) and water status traits (through the canopy temperature, stomatal conductance and carbon isotopic composition) measured during the reproductive stage for ...
Published on May 1, 2019in Plant Science3.79
Muhammad Adeel Hassan2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CAAS: Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore),
Mengjiao Yang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Xinjiang Agricultural University)
+ 5 AuthorsZhonghu He48
Estimated H-index: 48
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center)
Abstract Wheat improvement programs require rapid assessment of large numbers of individual plots across multiple environments. Vegetation indices (VIs) that are mainly associated with yield and yield-related physiological traits, and rapid evaluation of canopy normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) can assist in-season selection. Multi-spectral imagery using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) can readily assess the VIs traits at various crop growth stages. Thirty-two wheat cultivars and bree...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Agricultural Water Management3.54
Shreedevi Moharana1
Estimated H-index: 1
(IITG: Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati),
Subashisa Dutta11
Estimated H-index: 11
(IITG: Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati)
Abstract Leaf relative water content (LRWC) for paddy crop is a key component in evaluating crop growth. Present study aims to assess the variability of water stress in a rice agriculture system for summer/rabi and winter/kharif rice during pre-monsoon and monsoon period respectively. Amongst the examined indices, water band index (WBI), normalized water index-3 (NWI-3), normalized water index-4 (NWI-4) are considered to indicate water stress in paddy crop based on statistical performance of gro...
Lukas Prey1
Estimated H-index: 1
(TUM: Technische Universität München),
Urs Schmidhalter36
Estimated H-index: 36
(TUM: Technische Universität München)
Abstract Remote sensing allows the assessment of biomass and grain yield of cereals. An enhanced potential to detect specific traits is offered by proximal hyperspectral sensing, in contrast the potential of satellite remote sensing might still be leveraged up seen the degree of spatial and temporal resolution. Consequently, hyperspectral satellite data are still not readily available for most agricultural applications and ground truth validation done at high frequency throughout the season rema...
View next paperSpectral vegetation indices as nondestructive tools for determining durum wheat yield.