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The effect of recovery strategies on physical performance and cumulative fatigue in competitive basketball

Published on Sep 1, 2008in Journal of Sports Sciences 2.81
· DOI :10.1080/02640410802104912
Paul G. Montgomery8
Estimated H-index: 8
(AIS: Australian Institute of Sport),
David B. Pyne52
Estimated H-index: 52
(AIS: Australian Institute of Sport)
+ 3 AuthorsClare Leslie Minahan17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Griffith University)
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Abstract
Abstract To evaluate the effectiveness of recovery strategies on physical performance during a 3-day tournament style basketball competition, 29 male players (mean age 19.1 years, s = 2.1; height 1.84 m, s = 0.34; body mass 88.5 kg, s = 14.7) were assigned to one of three treatment groups: carbohydrate + stretching (7.7 g · kg −1 · day −1, s = 1.7; ‘n = 9), cold water immersion (11°C, 5 × 1; n = 10) or full leg compression garments (18 mmHg, ∼18 h; n = 10). Effects of the recovery strategies on pre–post tournament performance tests were expressed as the mean change (% ± standard deviation of the change score). Changes and differences were standardized for accumulated game time, assessed against the smallest worthwhile change for each test, and reported qualitatively. Accumulated fatigue was evident over the tournament with small to moderate impairments in performance tests. Sprint and agility performance decreased by 0.7% (s = 1.3) and 2.0% (s = 1.9) respectively. Vertical jump decreased substantially aft...
  • References (33)
  • Citations (124)
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References33
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2008in Journal of Sports Sciences 2.81
Joanna Vaile10
Estimated H-index: 10
(AIS: Australian Institute of Sport),
Shona L. Halson26
Estimated H-index: 26
(AIS: Australian Institute of Sport)
+ 1 AuthorsBrian Dawson50
Estimated H-index: 50
(UWA: University of Western Australia)
Abstract To assess the effect of cold water immersion and active recovery on thermoregulation and repeat cycling performance in the heat, ten well-trained male cyclists completed five trials, each separated by one week. Each trial consisted of a 30-min exercise task, one of five 15-min recoveries (intermittent cold water immersion in 10°C, 15°C and 20°C water, continuous cold water immersion in 20°C water or active recovery), followed by 40 min passive recovery, before repeating the 30-min exerc...
Published on Dec 1, 2007in International Journal of Sports Medicine 2.13
Melissa Crowe10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Donna O'Connor11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Donna Rudd8
Estimated H-index: 8
This study investigated the effects of cold water immersion on recovery from anaerobic cycling. Seventeen (13 male, 4 female) active subjects underwent a crossover, randomised design involving two testing sessions 2 - 6 d apart. Testing involved two 30-s maximal cycling efforts separated by a one-hour recovery period of 10-min cycling warm-down followed by either passive rest or 15-min cold water immersion (13 - 14 degrees C) with passive rest. Peak power, total work and postexercise blood lacta...
Published on Jan 29, 2007in British Journal of Sports Medicine 11.64
Rob Duffield33
Estimated H-index: 33
(CSU: Charles Sturt University),
Marc Portus19
Estimated H-index: 19
Objective: To compare the effects of three types of full-body compression garments (Skins, Adidas and Under Armour) on repeat-sprint and throwing performance in cricket players. Methods: Following familiarisation, 10 male cricket players performed four randomised exercise sessions (3 garments and a control). Each session involved a 30 min repeat-sprint exercise protocol comprising 20 m sprints every minute, separated by submaximal exercise. Throwing tests included a pre-exercise and a postexerci...
Published on Mar 1, 2006in British Journal of Sports Medicine 11.64
Nicholas D. Gill30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Waikato Institute of Technology),
Christopher Martyn Beaven2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Christian J. Cook33
Estimated H-index: 33
Objectives: To examine the effectiveness of four interventions on the rate and magnitude of muscle damage recovery, as measured by creatine kinase (CK). Methods: 23 elite male rugby players were monitored transdermally before, immediately after, 36 hours after, and 84 hours after competitive rugby matches. Players were randomly assigned to complete one of four post-match strategies: contrast water therapy (CWT), compression garment (GAR), low intensity active exercise (ACT), and passive recovery...
Published on Mar 1, 2006in European Journal of Applied Physiology 3.06
Motoi Yamane4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Chukyo University),
Hiroyasu Teruya1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Osaka University of Health and Sport Sciences)
+ 3 AuthorsMitsuo Kosaka7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Chukyo University)
The influence of regular post-exercise cold application to exercised muscles trained by ergometer cycling (leg muscles) or handgrip exercise using a weight-loaded handgrip ergometer (forearm flexor muscles) was studied in human volunteers. Muscle loads were applied during exercise programs three to four times a week for 4–6 weeks. Besides measuring parameters characterizing muscle performance, femoral and brachial artery diameters were determined ultrasonographically. Training effects were ident...
Published on Jan 1, 2006in Sports Medicine 7.58
Ian M. Wilcock2
Estimated H-index: 2
(AUT: Auckland University of Technology),
John B. Cronin41
Estimated H-index: 41
(AUT: Auckland University of Technology),
Wayne Hing22
Estimated H-index: 22
(AUT: Auckland University of Technology)
Recovery from exercise can be an important factor in performance during repeated bouts of exercise. In a tournament situation, where athletes may compete numerous times over a few days, enhancing recovery may provide a competitive advantage. One method that is gaining popularity as a means to enhance post-game or post-training recovery is immersion in water. Much of the literature on the ability of water immersion as a means to improve athletic recovery appears to be based on anecdotal informati...
Published on Dec 1, 2005in Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 3.62
Matt Spencer16
Estimated H-index: 16
(AIS: Australian Institute of Sport),
Claire Rechichi6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Western Australian Institute of Sport)
+ 3 AuthorsCarmel Goodman41
Estimated H-index: 41
(UWA: University of Western Australia)
International field hockey tournaments may require teams to play three games within a period of four days. Therefore, there is potential for residual fatigue to affect the movement patterns of players during subsequent games. The purpose of this study was to document changes in time-motion analysis of 14 elite male field hockey players during three games within a period of four days during an international tournament. In addition, the nature of and any changes in repeated-sprint activity were in...
Published on Aug 1, 2005in European Journal of Applied Physiology 3.06
Craig Twist19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Roger G. Eston53
Estimated H-index: 53
Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is a common occurrence following activities with a high eccentric component. Alterations to the torque–velocity relationship following EIMD would appear to have serious implications for athletic performance, particularly as they relate to impairment of maximal intensity exercise. However, this has been studied infrequently. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of EIMD on maximal intermittent sprint performance. Ten male participants (age 22.4±...
Published on Jun 1, 2005in Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 3.62
Brian Dawson50
Estimated H-index: 50
(UWA: University of Western Australia),
S. Gow1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UWA: University of Western Australia)
+ 2 AuthorsG. Stewart7
Estimated H-index: 7
This study investigated whether or not immediate post-game recovery procedures could enhance the rate of recovery in Australian football players in the first 48 hr after a game. Control, stretch, pool walking and hot/cold recoveries were trialled. Typical next day recovery training (25 min of pool exercise) was also performed after each game. Muscle soreness ratings and measures of flexibility (sit and reach) and power (6-s cycling sprint and vertical jump) were obtained 45 hr pre-game (Thursday...
Published on Nov 1, 2004in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 3.02
Kirstin Lane13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
H. A. Wenger1
Estimated H-index: 1
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of active recovery (AR), massage (MR), and cold water immersion (CR) on performance of repeated bouts of high-intensity cycling separated by 24 hours. For each recovery condition, subjects were asked to take part in 2 intermittent cycling sessions; 18 minutes of varying work intervals performed in succession at a resistance of 80 g/kg body weight separated by 24 hours. One of four 15-minute recovery conditions immediately followed the first se...
Cited By124
Newest
Ying Ma (BNU: Beijing Normal University), Li Wang (SNNU: Shaanxi Normal University)+ -3 AuthorsTingzhao Wang (SNNU: Shaanxi Normal University)
ABSTRACTBackground: Although children with intellectual disabilities (ID) are at greater risk of falls from poorer balance ability than typically developing children, reliable information about whi...
Published on Jun 13, 2019
Christopher Ballmann6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Hunter Hotchkiss + 1 AuthorsRebecca R. Rogers
Lower body compression (LBC) has been shown as an effective recovery tool from basketball but it is unknown how it affects performance. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of wearing a LBC garment on anaerobic exercise performance in collegiate basketball players. Healthy Division I collegiate basketball players (n = 12) were recruited for this study. In a crossover, counterbalanced study design, subjects volunteered to participate in two separate visits each with a different co...
Published on Apr 6, 2019in European Journal of Sport Science 2.38
Jonathan Leeder5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Northumbria University),
Matthew Godfrey (Northumbria University)+ 4 AuthorsGlyn Howatson30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Northumbria University)
It is a common requirement in tournament scenarios for athletes to compete multiple times in a relatively short time period, with insufficient recovery time not allowing full restoration of physical performance. This study aimed to develop a greater understanding of the physiological stress experienced by athletes in a tournament scenario, and how a commonly used recovery strategy, cold water immersion (CWI), might influence these markers. Twenty one trained male games players (age 19 ± 2; body ...
Published on Jan 1, 2019
Nicholas G. Allen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney),
Samuel M. Higham1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney),
Rob Duffield33
Estimated H-index: 33
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)
Concurrent training involves the combined use of divergent exercise stimuli within either a specific training day or continuing programme. Considerations around acute and cumulative fatigue, antagonistic molecular signalling, and nutrient timing may influence recovery and subsequent adaptation to this mode of training. Thus, attention should be paid to optimal recovery methods to improve training tolerance, maximise adaptations, and limit negative outcomes. This chapter will explore these issues...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Muscles, ligaments and tendons journal
Xavier Valle8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Barcelona),
Lluís Til9
Estimated H-index: 9
+ 4 AuthorsRosa Artells13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Barcelona)
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a compression garment as DOMS prevention. This was accomplished by provoking a DOMS in 15 athletes, running on a treadmill at 73% of their maximal aerobic velocity, during 40 minutes with a 10% negative slope; wearing the compression garments on one thigh, protected thigh (PT), and not in the contralateral thigh, control thigh (CT). A clinical and MRI diagnosis of DOMS was performed. Biopsies in both vastus lateralis were done, and the amount ...
Published on Nov 14, 2018
Jair Burboa (Metropolitan University), Felipe Godoy (Metropolitan University)+ 4 AuthorsJaime Hinzpeter4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Chile)
Paul G. Montgomery8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Brendan D. Maloney1
Estimated H-index: 1
Purpose:To determine the changes in game performance during tournament play of elite 3x3 basketball. Methods:361 males and 208 females competing in selected international tournaments had game demands assessed by wearable technology (GPS, inertial sensor, heart rate) along with post game blood lactate and perceived responses. Differences in the means for selected variables between games were compared using magnitude based inferences and reported with Effect Size and associated confidence limits, ...
Published on Oct 8, 2018
Patrick Carrington5
Estimated H-index: 5
(CMU: Carnegie Mellon University),
Gierad Laput13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CMU: Carnegie Mellon University),
Jeffrey P. Bigham34
Estimated H-index: 34
(CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)
Sports are increasingly data-driven. Athletes use a variety of physical activity monitors to capture their movements, improve performance, and achieve excellence. To understand how wheelchair athletes want to use and share their activity data, we conducted a study using a prototype wheelchair fitness tracking device, which served as a probe to facilitate discussions. We interviewed 15 wheelchair basketball players about the use of performance data in the context of wheelchair basketball, and we ...