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Validating the voodoo doll task as a proxy for aggressive parenting behavior

Published on Jan 1, 2016in Psychology of Violence 2.77
· DOI :10.1037/a0038456
Randy J. McCarthy9
Estimated H-index: 9
(NIU: Northern Illinois University),
Julie L. Crouch15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
+ 2 AuthorsJohn J. Skowronski35
Estimated H-index: 35
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
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Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Six studies (N = 1,081 general population parents) assessed the validity of the voodoo doll task (VDT) as a proxy for aggressive parenting behaviors. METHOD: Participants were given an opportunity to symbolically inflict harm by choosing to stick "pins" into a doll representing their child. RESULTS: Individual differences in parents' trait aggression (Studies 1, 2, and 6), state hostility (Study 3), attitudes toward the corporal punishment of children (Study 4), self-control (Study 6), depression (Study 6), and child physical abuse risk (Study 6) were associated with increased pin usage. Further, parents used more pins after imagining their child performing negative behaviors compared to after imagining their child perform positive behaviors (Study 5). A number of demographic variables also were associated with pin usage: Fathers used pins more than mothers and parents' education level was inversely related to pin usage. Finally, on average, parents viewed the VDT as slightly uncomfortable, but not objectionable, to complete (Study 6). CONCLUSIONS: Our evidence suggests that the VDT may serve as a useful proxy for parent-to-child aggression. Language: en
  • References (31)
  • Citations (10)
Cite
References31
Newest
Published on May 1, 2014in Child Abuse & Neglect 2.85
Lauren M. Irwin5
Estimated H-index: 5
(NIU: Northern Illinois University),
John J. Skowronski35
Estimated H-index: 35
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
+ 2 AuthorsBettina Zengel5
Estimated H-index: 5
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
Abstract This study examined whether caregivers who exhibit high risk for child physical abuse differ from low-risk caregivers in reactions to transgressing children. Caregivers read vignettes describing child transgressions. These vignettes varied in: (a) the type of transgression described (moral, conventional, personal), (b) presentation of transgression-mitigating information (present, absent), and (c) whether a directive to avoid the transgression was in the vignette (yes, no). After readin...
Published on Mar 1, 2014in Aggressive Behavior 2.55
Gregory D. Webster25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UF: University of Florida),
C. Nathan DeWall45
Estimated H-index: 45
(UK: University of Kentucky)
+ 13 AuthorsBenjamin S. Crosier10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UF: University of Florida)
A key problem facing aggression research is how to measure individual differences in aggression accurately and efficiently without sacrificing reliability or validity. Researchers are increasingly demanding brief measures of aggression for use in applied settings, field studies, pretest screening, longitudinal, and daily diary studies. The authors selected the three highest loading items from each of the Aggression Questionnaire's (Buss & Perry, 1992) four subscales-Physical Aggression, Verbal A...
Published on Nov 1, 2013in Computers in Human Behavior 4.31
Krista Casler8
Estimated H-index: 8
(F&M: Franklin & Marshall College),
Lydia Bickel1
Estimated H-index: 1
(F&M: Franklin & Marshall College),
Elizabeth Hackett1
Estimated H-index: 1
(F&M: Franklin & Marshall College)
Recent and emerging technology permits psychologists today to recruit and test participants in more ways than ever before. But to what extent can behavioral scientists trust these varied methods to yield reasonably equivalent results? Here, we took a behavioral, face-to-face task and converted it to an online test. We compared the online responses of participants recruited via Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk) and via social media postings on Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit. We also recruited a sta...
Published on Jul 1, 2013in Aggressive Behavior 2.55
C. Nathan DeWall45
Estimated H-index: 45
(UK: University of Kentucky),
Eli J. Finkel46
Estimated H-index: 46
(NU: Northwestern University)
+ 5 AuthorsFrank D. Fincham78
Estimated H-index: 78
(FSU: Florida State University)
Aggression pervades modern life. To understand the root causes of aggression, researchers have developed several methods to assess aggressive inclinations. The current article introduces a new behavioral method-the voodoo doll task (VDT)-that offers a reliable and valid trait and state measure of aggressive inclinations across settings and relationship contexts. Drawing on theory and research on the law of similarity and magical beliefs (Rozin, Millman, & Nemeroff [1986], Journal of Personality ...
Published on Oct 14, 2012
Joseph P. Simmons21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UPenn: University of Pennsylvania),
Leif D. Nelson25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of California, Berkeley),
Uri Simonsohn24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)
One year after publishing "False-Positive Psychology," we propose a simple implementation of disclosure that requires but 21 words to achieve full transparency. This article is written in a casual tone. It includes phone-taken pictures of milk-jars and references to ice-cream and sardines.
Published on Jun 1, 2012in Child Abuse & Neglect 2.85
Julie L. Crouch15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NIU: Northern Illinois University),
Lauren M. Irwin5
Estimated H-index: 5
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
+ 3 AuthorsJoel S. Milner37
Estimated H-index: 37
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
Abstract Objective Contemporary theories of child physical abuse (CPA) emphasize the proximal role of social cognitive processes (many of which are implicit in nature) in the occurrence of parental aggression. However, methods that allow for the systematic examination of implicit cognitive processes during the course of aggressive interactions are needed. To address this need, the present study was designed to examine the utility of the Word Game , an innovative procedure designed to assess impl...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 5.92
Eli J. Finkel46
Estimated H-index: 46
(NU: Northwestern University),
C. Nathan DeWall45
Estimated H-index: 45
(UK: University of Kentucky)
+ 3 AuthorsDavid C. Atkins44
Estimated H-index: 44
(UW: University of Washington)
Deriving hypotheses from I3 theory (pronounced "I-cubed theory"), the authors conducted 4 studies to clarify the circumstances under which dispositional aggressiveness predicts intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration. Consistent with the hypothesis that this link would be stronger when inhibitory processes are weak rather than strong, Studies 1 and 2 demonstrated that dispositional aggressiveness was an especially robust predictor of IPV perpetration among people experiencing self-regulator...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 5.92
Erica B. Slotter14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Villanova University),
Eli J. Finkel46
Estimated H-index: 46
+ 4 AuthorsFrank D. Fincham78
Estimated H-index: 78
(FSU: Florida State University)
Why do people behave aggressively toward romantic partners, and what can put the brakes on this aggression? Provocation robustly predicts aggression in both intimate and nonintimate relationships. Four methodologically diverse studies tested the hypothesis that provocation severity and relationship commitment interact to predict aggression toward one’s romantic partner, with the aggression-promoting effects of provocation diminishing as relationship commitment increases. Across all four studies,...
Published on Jan 1, 2011in Perspectives on Psychological Science 8.19
Michael D. Buhrmester13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Texas at Austin),
Tracy Kwang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Texas at Austin),
Samuel D. Gosling50
Estimated H-index: 50
(University of Texas at Austin)
Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk) is a relatively new website that contains the major elements required to conduct research: an integrated participant compensation system; a large participant pool; and a streamlined process of study design, participant recruitment, and data collection. In this article, we describe and evaluate the potential contributions of MTurk to psychology and other social sciences. Findings indicate that (a) MTurk participants are slightly more demographically diverse than a...
Published on Jun 1, 2010in Review of General Psychology 2.79
Christopher J. Ferguson42
Estimated H-index: 42
(TAMIU: Texas A&M International University)
Violent video games have been a source of controversy in the United States and elsewhere for several decades. Considerable concern has been raised in the public and scientific communities about the alleged deleterious effects of violent games. These concerns may coincide with periodic moral panics about media's influence, particularly on youth. This paper argues that the negative effects of violent games have been exaggerated by some elements of the scientific community, fitting with past cycles...
Cited By10
Newest
Anna Gillions (Coventry University), Rachael Cheang (Coventry University), Rui V. Duarte13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Liverpool)
Abstract Violence and aggression represent a serious problem, with significant cost and impact at individual and societal level. There has been increasing interest in the potential of mindfulness interventions to decrease levels of violence and aggression. This paper systematically reviews the evidence to assess the effectiveness of mindfulness interventions for the reduction of violence and aggression levels. Five electronic databases were searched, and methods followed published guidance for s...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 1.83
Christina M. Rodriguez20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham),
Shannon M.O. Wittig3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)
Abstract Parental socio-cognitive factors may predict their physical discipline use as well as their perceptions of children's problem behavior; infant temperament may also influence parents' discipline use. Using a bidirectional approach, the current study investigated whether attitudes approving of parent-child aggression (PCA), negative child behavior attributions, knowledge of nonphysical discipline options, and infant temperament predicted 186 mothers' and 146 fathers' PCA use and child pro...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Child Abuse & Neglect 2.85
Christina M. Rodriguez20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham),
Paul J. Silvia52
Estimated H-index: 52
(UNCG: University of North Carolina at Greensboro),
Doris F. Pu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)
Abstract Parents' cognitive schemas about parenting, personal vulnerabilities, and personal resources may affect their risk of engaging in parent-child aggression (PCA). This longitudinal study examined predictors of change in mothers' and fathers' PCA risk across the transition to parenthood, comparing trajectories of parents evidencing high versus low sociodemographic risk. Potential predictors involved parenting-relevant schemas (consistent with Social Information Processing theory, including...
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Leadership Quarterly 5.63
Lindie H. Liang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University),
Douglas J. Brown29
Estimated H-index: 29
(UW: University of Waterloo)
+ 3 AuthorsLisa M. Keeping14
Estimated H-index: 14
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)
Abstract When a subordinate receives abusive treatment from a supervisor, a natural response is to retaliate against the supervisor. Although retaliation is dysfunctional and should be discouraged, we examine the potential functional role retaliation plays in terms of alleviating the negative consequences of abusive supervision on subordinate justice perceptions. Based on the notion that retaliation following mistreatment can restore justice for victims, we propose a model whereby retaliation fo...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Psychological Reports 1.02
Randy J. McCarthy9
Estimated H-index: 9
Three studies (total N = 1777 parents) examined whether harsh parenting behaviors would increase when parents experienced an instigation and whether this increase would be especially pronounced for parents who were high in trait aggression. These predictions were tested both when parents’ experience of an instigation was manipulated (Studies 1 and 2) and when parents’ perceptions of their child’s instigating behavior was reported (Study 3). Further, these predictions were tested across a variety...
Published on Nov 20, 2017in Journal of Applied Psychology 5.07
Lindie H. Liang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University),
Douglas J. Brown29
Estimated H-index: 29
(UW: University of Waterloo)
+ 3 AuthorsLisa M. Keeping14
Estimated H-index: 14
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)
On the basis of the notion that the ability to exert self-control is critical to the regulation of aggressive behaviors, we suggest that mindfulness, an aspect of the self-control process, plays a key role in curbing workplace aggression. In particular, we note the conceptual and empirical distinctions between dimensions of mindfulness (i.e., mindful awareness and mindful acceptance) and investigate their respective abilities to regulate workplace aggression. In an experimental study (Study 1), ...
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology 0.80
David S. Chester14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Zachary T. Whitt1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsC. Nathan DeWall45
Estimated H-index: 45
We introduce a new measure of sub-clinical self-harm tendencies, the Voodoo Doll Self-Injury Task (VDSIT). In this computer task, participants virtually stick a number of sharp pins in a doll that represents themselves. Across five community and undergraduate samples who were not recruited based on their self-harm history or risk (total N = 1,289), VDSIT scores were higher among participants with histories of actual self-injury and were positively correlated with state and trait level motivation...
Published on May 1, 2017in Child Abuse & Neglect 2.85
Randy J. McCarthy9
Estimated H-index: 9
(NIU: Northern Illinois University),
John J. Skowronski35
Estimated H-index: 35
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
+ 1 AuthorsJoel S. Milner37
Estimated H-index: 37
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
Abstract Parents’ evaluations of children are believed to be a cognitive contributor to their subsequent child-directed harsh or physically abusive behaviors. The current research examined whether parents’ ( N = 100) evaluations of children were moderated by either (a) the child behavior on which the evaluation was based and (b) parents’ measured risk for child physical abuse. The study also explored whether parents’ evaluations of children were related to their tendencies to symbolically harm t...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Cognitive Therapy and Research 2.28
Joel S. Milner37
Estimated H-index: 37
(NIU: Northern Illinois University),
Michael F. Wagner5
Estimated H-index: 5
(NIU: Northern Illinois University),
Julie L. Crouch15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
Six studies explored the extent to which evaluative conditioning (EC) can change adults’ child-related attitudes and expectations. A subset of studies also investigated the extent to which EC can change child-related attributions of hostile intent, anger, use of harsh discipline, and use of punishment. An initial study demonstrated that a brief EC procedure increased positive attitudes, decreased negative attitudes, and decreased expected need for future child discipline; findings that were repl...
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Applied Cognitive Psychology 1.55
John J. Skowronski35
Estimated H-index: 35
(NIU: Northern Illinois University),
Julie L. Crouch15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
+ 6 AuthorsJoel S. Milner37
Estimated H-index: 37
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
Summary Positive memories tend to hold their affective intensity across time better than negative memories, a phenomenon referred to as the fading affect bias (FAB). An initial study explored this bias in the context of parents' affective responses to memories involving their children. Specifically, parents (N = 90 for Study 1) were asked to recall three positive events and three negative events involving their children. Next, parents rated how positively or negatively they felt when each event ...