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Relations among Children's Social Goals, Implicit Personality Theories, and Responses to Social Failure.

Published on Jan 1, 1997in Developmental Psychology3.34
· DOI :10.1037/0012-1649.33.2.263
Erdley Ca1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UMaine: University of Maine),
Kathleen M. Cain5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Gettysburg College)
+ 2 AuthorsCarol S. Dweck76
Estimated H-index: 76
(Columbia University)
Cite
Abstract
Two studies examined children's thought patterns in relation to their responses to social challenge. In Study 1, 4th and 5th graders tried out for a pen pal club under either a performance goal (stressing the evaluative nature of the tryout) or a learning goal (emphasizing the potential learning opportunities). In their behavior and attributions following rejection, children who were focused on a performance goal reacted with more helplessness, whereas children given a learning goal displayed a more mastery-oriented response. Study 2 found that in response to hypothetical socially challenging situations, 4th, 5th, and 6th graders who believed personality was nonmalleable (entity theorists) vs. malleable (incremental theorists) were more likely to endorse performance goals. Together, these studies indicate that children's goals in social situations are associated with their responses to social failure and are predicted by their implicit theories about their personality.
  • References (28)
  • Citations (153)
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References28
Newest
Published on Aug 1, 1996in Child Development5.02
Cynthia A. Erdley16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UMaine: University of Maine),
Steven R. Asher45
Estimated H-index: 45
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
This study examined whether children who vary in their behavioral responses (aggression vs. withdrawal vs. problem solving) to ambiguous provocation but who are similar in their attributional processes differ in their social goals and self-efficacy perceptions. In response to 10 hypothetical situations involving ambiguous provocation, fourth- and fifth-grade students (n = 781) indicated whether or not the protagonist intended to cause the harm and reported how they would respond to the protagoni...
Published on Jan 1, 1996
Jaana Juvonen36
Estimated H-index: 36
,
Kathryn R. Wentzel36
Estimated H-index: 36
1. Introduction Part I. Social Motivation: Perceptions on Self: 2. Teacher and classmate influences on scholastic motivation self-esteem and level of voice in adolescents Susan Harter 3. Self-presentation tactics promoting teacher and peer approval: the function of excuses and other clever explanations Jaana Juvonen 4. Social self-discrepancy: a theory relating peer relationship problems and school maladjustment Janis B. Kupersmidt, Kathy S. Buchele, Mary Ellen Voeller and Constantine Sedikides ...
Published on Dec 8, 1995
Martin L. Maehr34
Estimated H-index: 34
Part of a series that reflects research and theory concerned with motivation and achievement in work, school and play, this title focuses on a particular issue or theme.
Published on Dec 1, 1994in Child Development5.02
Patricia A. Smiley7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Pomona College),
Carol S. Dweck76
Estimated H-index: 76
(Columbia University)
Smiley, Patricia A., and Dweck, Carol S. Individual Differences in Achievement Goals among Young Children. Child Development, 1994 65, 1723–1743. Developmental research has generally not found evidence of helpless responses to failure in young children; a prevailing view is that young children lack the cognitive prerequisite for helplessness. However, recent evidence suggests that even preschoolers are vulnerable to helplessness in some situations. In the present study with 4- and 5-year-olds, w...
Published on Apr 1, 1993in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology3.41
John E. Lochman56
Estimated H-index: 56
(Duke University),
Kathleen K. Wayland5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Duke University),
Karen J. White3
Estimated H-index: 3
(ND: University of Notre Dame)
Examined the relations between adolescent boys' social goals of dominance, revenge, avoidance, and affiliation and (1) self-reported negative adolescent outcomes; (2) subjective sense of self-esteem; and (3) externalizing, internalizing, and prosocial behaviors, as rated by peers and teachers. Results indicated that social goal values were related to diverse aspects of self-, teacher-, and peer-reported social and behavioral functioning, with a consistent association found between a range of del...
Published on Mar 1, 1992in Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease1.86
S. Shirley Feldman49
Estimated H-index: 49
,
Glen R. Elliott1
Estimated H-index: 1
Adolescents embody the best hopes of American society. Their vital role in shaping our future lends particular significance to their success in negotiating the passage from childhood to adulthood, while their intensity and visibility often make them barometers of social change. It is all the more remarkable, then, that this critical period has only recently captured the full attention of researchers."At the Threshold" presents the long-awaited findings of the Carnegie Foundation study on adolesc...
Published on Jul 1, 1991in Contemporary Sociology0.46
Marlena M. Studer1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Steven R. Asher45
Estimated H-index: 45
,
John D. Coie54
Estimated H-index: 54
Introduction 1. Recent advances in the study of peer rejection S. R. Asher Part I. Behavioural Characteristics of Peer Rejected Children: 2. Peer group behavior and social status J. D. Coie, K. A. Dodge and J. Kupersmidt 3. Children's entry behavior M. Putallaz and A. Wasserman 4. Preschooler's behavioral orientations and patterns of peer contact: predictive of peer status? G. R. Ladd, J. M. Price and C. H. Hart Part II. Parent-Child Relations and Peer Rejection: 5. Social withdrawal in childhoo...
Published on Jan 1, 1990
Janis B. Kupersmidt13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
John D. Coie54
Estimated H-index: 54
,
Kenneth A. Dodge115
Estimated H-index: 115
Published on Jan 1, 1990
Valanne L. Henderson3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Carol S. Dweck76
Estimated H-index: 76
Cited By153
Newest
Published on Jul 9, 2019in Social Development1.81
Hae Yeon Lee4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Texas at Austin),
David S. Yeager22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Texas at Austin)
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Business Research4.03
William J. Montford (JU: Jacksonville University), R. Bret Leary4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UNR: University of Nevada, Reno),
Duane M. Nagel (WSU: Wichita State University)
Abstract The current research explores the influence of implicit self-theories on decisions involving financial risk. Building from research on self-signaling, we explore how loss salience impacts the relationship between an individual's self-theory and financial risk choice. We show that entity theorists are less risk-seeking under conditions in which a possible monetary loss is more salient (i.e. presented less ambiguously, Studies 1a and 1b). We demonstrate a reversal of this effect by showin...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of Research in Science Teaching3.13
Sandra van Aalderen-Smeets4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UT: University of Twente),
Juliette Walma van der Molen9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UT: University of Twente),
Iro Xenidou-Dervou8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Lboro: Loughborough University)
Despite the widely accepted view that low self-efficacy beliefs negatively influence students' intention to opt for a STEM field oriented study or career path, it remains unclear how to effectively stimulate these beliefs in students who do seem to have the ability and motivation to opt for a STEM career. A suggestion from previous literature is that students' implicit beliefs about the malleability of their learning ability can have a major impact on their self-efficacy beliefs, and, importantl...
Published on Mar 29, 2019in Journal of Early Adolescence1.75
Tana Luo (UCSD: University of California, San Diego), David C. Schwartz64
Estimated H-index: 64
(SC: University of Southern California)
+ 4 AuthorsDaryaneh Badaly4
Estimated H-index: 4
This short-term, longitudinal study examines evidence that the level of popularity among adolescents’ peer role models exacerbates the emotional impact of mistreatment by peers. We recruited 469 adolescents (255 boys, 214 girls; X¯ age = 12.7 years) from an ethnically diverse middle school and followed these youth for a 1-year period. We collected identical measurement batteries in two consecutive waves. Participants completed a self-report assessment of depressive symptoms, as well as a peer-no...
Published on Feb 7, 2019in Educational Psychology1.25
Wenshu Luo11
Estimated H-index: 11
(NTU: Nanyang Technological University),
Gregory Arief D. Liem17
Estimated H-index: 17
(NTU: Nanyang Technological University),
Kerry Lee18
Estimated H-index: 18
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
AbstractThis study investigated the interaction between self-efficacy and implicit beliefs of ability in their association with maladaptive learning in mathematics. The analysis was based on a large sample of 2538 Singapore Secondary 2 students (Mage = 13.75), who took measures of entity beliefs of ability, self-efficacy, and three maladaptive learning variables in mathematics: novelty avoidance, cheating, and anxiety. We conducted latent interaction analysis with gender and previous mathematics...
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Clinical Psychology Review9.90
Daniel Fulford11
Estimated H-index: 11
(BU: Boston University),
Timothy R. Campellone7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco),
David E. Gard14
Estimated H-index: 14
(SFSU: San Francisco State University)
Abstract Limited quantity and quality of interpersonal exchanges and relationships predict worse symptomatic and hospitalization outcomes and limit functional recovery in people with schizophrenia. While deficits in social skills and social cognition contribute to much of the impairment in social functioning in schizophrenia, our focus on the current review is social motivation—the drive to connect with others and form meaningful, lasting relationships. We pay particular attention to how recent ...
Published on May 19, 2018in Cognition & Emotion2.37
Krista De Castella7
Estimated H-index: 7
(ANU: Australian National University),
Michael J. Platow28
Estimated H-index: 28
(ANU: Australian National University)
+ 1 AuthorsLisa Feldman Barrett L F132
Estimated H-index: 132
(Stanford University)
ABSTRACTPeople’s beliefs about their ability to control their emotions predict a range of important psychological outcomes. It is not clear, however, whether these beliefs are playing a causal role, and if so, why this might be. In the current research, we tested whether avoidance-based emotion regulation explains the link between beliefs and psychological outcomes. In Study 1 (N = 112), a perceived lack of control over emotions predicted poorer psychological health outcomes (increased self-repo...