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Early Architectural Images from Muara Jambi on Sumatra, Indonesia

Published on Jan 1, 2009in Asian Perspectives
· DOI :10.1353/asi.0.0009
Mai Lin Tjoa-Bonatz2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
J. David Neidel1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Agus Widiatmoko1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract
Nine terracotta bricks and brick fragments, containing incised drawings of different types of buildings, were discovered at the large Muara Jambi temple complex in eastern Sumatra. Likely dating from between the second half of the ninth and the first half of the fourteenth centuries, these bricks contain the oldest graphic representations of Sumatran architecture. While two of these designs have been previously published, the brick images have not been thoroughly analyzed in order to determine what new light they shed on the domestic architecture and building traditions of early lowland Sumatran settlements. To address this lacuna, we analyze the bricks and their archaeological context in order to interpret when the images were made, who created the images, the purpose behind them, the types of architecture depicted on the bricks, and the reasons behind the diversity of building types represented. Having argued that the majority of bricks shows domestic architecture reflecting a variety of cultural influences, we conclude by suggesting that the presence of such images supports the scholarly view that Muara Jambi was a multiethnic trading community.
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  • Citations (3)
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References43
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Published on Jan 1, 2008
Dominik Bonatz3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
John David Neidel1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Mai Lin Tjoa-Bonatz2
Estimated H-index: 2
The highlands of Sumatra remain one of the most neglected regions of insular Southeast Asia in terms of history and archaeology. No comprehensive research program incorporating both a survey and excavations within a defined geographical or environmental zone has been carried out there since Van der Hoop (1932) conducted his study of the megaliths on the Pasemah plateau in the 1930s. Meanwhile, Van der Hoop’s investigations and several other archaeological research activities at places such as no...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2005
Jacques Dumarçay5
Estimated H-index: 5
Carefully following their historical development, this volume describes the various construction techniques in southern Asia. Readers get acquainted successively with the techniques of carpentry layout, the setting of bricks, stone-cutting and stereotomy, as well as binders and plasterwork. With the help of drawings and photographs it is illustrated how the various difficulties subsequently encountered were met. The combination of the author's firm background in architecture, as well as an in-de...
3 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 2004
Timothy P. Barnard2
Estimated H-index: 2
People who call themselves Malay - Melayu - are found in many countries, united by a notional shared identity but separated by political boundaries, divergent histories, variant dialects, and peculiarities of local experience. The term 'Malay', widely used and readily understood in the region, turns out to be remarkably difficult to define or explain in detail. This book assembles research on the theme of how Malays have identified themselves in time and place, developed by a wide range of schol...
53 Citations
Claudine Salmon5
Estimated H-index: 5
Claudine Salmon ; L'histoire du gong et de sa diffusion en Asie en general et en Insulinde en particulier reste encore tres mal connue. Dans un travail recent, Inge Skog concluait qu'il y a tres peu d'information sur cet instrument de musique a Java avant le XIVe siecle. Or, la mise au jour d'un «gong militaire» pourvu d'une inscription chinoise datee des Song du Sud (1231) a l'interieur du complexe d'un temple apparemment bouddhique de Muara Jambi fait remonter l'introduction de l'instrument pl...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2002in Moussons
Pierre-Yves Manguin6
Estimated H-index: 6
This article surveys epigraphy, Malay literary texts, and the archaeological data to better understand the socio-spatial structuration process of western Southeast Asia’s ancient political systems, more specifically, Sriwijaya (7th-13th cent.) and its successor, the Melaka Sultanate (15th-17th cent.). Representations of their polities, as offered by the Malays themselves in a variety of literary genres, all allude to the centre and peripheries of their city-states, as well as to the movements of...
10 Citations Source Cite
Claudine Salmon5
Estimated H-index: 5
Claudine Salmon ; During the last decades several studies that were aimed at analysing the relations between Srivijaya and China, and more especially the tributary missions, have appeared. More recently the emphasis has been placed on the images of Srivijaya in the Chinese sources of the 13th and 14th centuries. In this paper we intend to reappraise the Srivijayan tributary missions to China, as reflected in the Chinese sources of the time. In so doing, we try to cast some lights on the rather c...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2000in World Archaeology
John N. Miksic1
Estimated H-index: 1
Archaeologists working in non-Western areas of the world tend to employ monothetic, unilinear definitions of ‘urbanization’. The definition of what constitutes a ‘city’ in archaeological terms is also ambiguous. Most definitions are biased by dependence on early archaeological work in the Mediterranean and Southwest Asia. Models of city formation must be based on multi-linear, polythetic criteria, in order to accommodate non-Western phenomena. A polythetic functional definition of urbanization r...
26 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 1999in The Journal of Asian Studies 0.92
Daigoro Chihara1
Estimated H-index: 1
15 Citations Source Cite
Cited By3
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Published on Nov 1, 2018in Journal of Ecology 5.17
Kartika Anggi Hapsari1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Göttingen),
Siria Biagioni4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Göttingen)
+ 4 AuthorsHermann Behling43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Göttingen)
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2018in The Holocene 2.42
Christina Ani Setyaningsih (University of Göttingen), Siria Biagioni4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Göttingen)
+ 3 AuthorsHermann Behling43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Göttingen)
Volcanic processes might have played an important role in the vegetation history of Sumatra, one of the largest and most tectonically active region in Southeast Asia. Palynological and macro-charcoal analysis results from Lake Njalau in the Kerinci Seblat National Park (KSNP) in Sumatra (Indonesia) provide an understanding of interactions between the volcanic deposition and vegetation in the past 5000 years. The deposition of volcanic material in the depression of the Lake Njalau (5100–4400 cal....
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Published on Aug 1, 2017in Quaternary Science Reviews 4.33
Kartika Anggi Hapsari1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Göttingen),
Siria Biagioni4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Göttingen)
+ 5 AuthorsHermann Behling43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Göttingen)
Abstract Tropical peatlands are important for the global carbon cycle as they store 18% of the total global peat carbon. As they are vulnerable to changes in temperature and precipitation, a rapidly changing environment endangers peatlands and their carbon storage potential. Understanding the mechanisms of peatland carbon accumulation from studying past developments may, therefore, help to assess the future role of tropical peatlands. Using a multi-proxy palaeoecological approach, a peat core ta...
5 Citations Source Cite