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Extinctions of aculeate pollinators in Britain and the role of large-scale agricultural changes

Published on Dec 12, 2014in Science 41.06
· DOI :10.1126/science.1257259
Jeff Ollerton34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Northampton),
Hilary E. Erenler3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Northampton)
+ 1 AuthorsRobin G M Crockett14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Northampton)
Abstract
It is increasingly recognized that many pollinator populations are declining. Ollerton et al. looked at British historical distribution records for bees and flower-visiting wasps across the past century. Though it is well known that agricultural intensification after World War II had a negative impact on many species, pollinator declines began in the decades preceding this time, when other changes were made to agricultural practices and policies. Science , this issue p. [1360][1] [1]: /lookup/volpage/346/1360?iss=6215
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  • Citations (114)
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References22
Newest
Published on May 21, 2014
H. Charles J. Godfray44
Estimated H-index: 44
(University of Oxford),
Tjeerd Blacquière15
Estimated H-index: 15
(WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)
+ 6 AuthorsAngela R. McLean35
Estimated H-index: 35
(University of Oxford)
There is evidence that in Europe and North America many species of pollinators are in decline, both in abundance and distribution. Although there is a long list of potential causes of this decline, there is concern that neonicotinoid insecticides, in particular through their use as seed treatments are, at least in part, responsible. This paper describes a project that set out to summarize the natural science evidence base relevant to neonicotinoid insecticides and insect pollinators in as policy...
196 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2013in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 8.30
Carolina L. Morales17
Estimated H-index: 17
(CONICET: National Scientific and Technical Research Council),
Marina P. Arbetman6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CONICET: National Scientific and Technical Research Council)
+ 1 AuthorsMarcelo A. Aizen44
Estimated H-index: 44
(CONICET: National Scientific and Technical Research Council)
Despite rising global concerns over the potential impacts of non-native bumble bee (Bombus spp) introductions on native species, large-scale and long-term assessments of the consequences of such introductions are lacking. Bombus ruderatus and Bombus terrestris were sequentially introduced into Chile and later entered Argentina's Patagonian region. A large-scale survey in Patagonia reveals that, in 5 years post-arrival, the highly invasive B terrestris has become the most abundant and widespread ...
69 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2013in Ecology Letters 9.14
Luísa G. Carvalheiro22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Leeds),
William E. Kunin46
Estimated H-index: 46
(University of Leeds)
+ 17 AuthorsDirk Maes27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Research Institute for Nature and Forest)
Concern about biodiversity loss has led to increased public investment in conservation. Whereas there is a widespread perception that such initiatives have been unsuccessful, there are few quantitative tests of this perception. Here, we evaluate whether rates of biodiversity change have altered in recent decades in three European countries (Great Britain, Netherlands and Belgium) for plants and flower visiting insects. We compared four 20-year periods, comparing periods of rapid land-use intensi...
161 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 29, 2013in Science 41.06
Laura A. Burkle12
Estimated H-index: 12
(MSU: Montana State University),
John C. Marlin8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Tiffany M. Knight35
Estimated H-index: 35
(UW: University of Washington)
Using historic data sets, we quantified the degree to which global change over 120 years disrupted plant-pollinator interactions in a temperate forest understory community in Illinois, USA. We found degradation of interaction network structure and function and extirpation of 50% of bee species. Network changes can be attributed to shifts in forb and bee phenologies resulting in temporal mismatches, nonrandom species extinctions, and loss of spatial co-occurrences between extant species in modifi...
377 Citations Source Cite
Ignasi Bartomeus25
Estimated H-index: 25
(RU: Rutgers University),
John S. Ascher14
Estimated H-index: 14
(NUS: National University of Singapore)
+ 4 AuthorsRachael Winfree28
Estimated H-index: 28
(RU: Rutgers University)
Pollinators such as bees are essential to the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. However, despite concerns about a global pollinator crisis, long-term data on the status of bee species are limited. We present a long-term study of relative rates of change for an entire regional bee fauna in the northeastern United States, based on >30,000 museum records representing 438 species. Over a 140-y period, aggregate native species richness weakly decreased, but richness declines were significant onl...
195 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2011in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 3.54
Tom D. Breeze12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Reading),
Alison Bailey14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Reading)
+ 1 AuthorsSimon G. Potts58
Estimated H-index: 58
(University of Reading)
Pollination services are known to provide substantial benefits to human populations and agriculture in particular. Although many species are known to provide pollination services, honeybees (Apis mellifera) are often assumed to provide the majority of these services to agriculture. Using data from a range of secondary sources, this study assesses the importance of insect pollinated crops at regional and national scales and investigates the capacity of honeybees to provide optimal pollination ser...
132 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2011in Oikos 3.71
Jeff Ollerton34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Northampton),
Rachael Winfree28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Northampton),
Sam Tarrant5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Northampton)
It is clear that the majority of fl owering plants are pollinated by insects and other animals, with a minority utilising abiotic pollen vectors, mainly wind. However there is no accurate published calculation of the proportion of the ca 352 000 species of angiosperms that interact with pollinators. Widely cited fi gures range from 67% to 96% but these have not been based on fi rm data. We estimated the number and proportion of fl owering plants that are pollinated by animals using published and...
882 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2011in Biological Conservation 4.66
Clive Hambler13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Oxford),
P. A. Henderson28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Oxford),
Martin R. Speight21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Oxford)
Abstract We present the first detailed comparison of extinction rates amongst a wide range of nonmarine groups, using data from Britain. For selected taxa, comparisons are made with rates in the United States and the globe. We estimate the overall extinction rate in Britain is 1–5% of the regional species list per century. Most of the groups of organisms assessed have very similar rates, with high rates in some groups which are aquatic, use dead wood or are on their climatic margin. In Britain, ...
26 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2010in Trends in Ecology and Evolution 15.94
Simon G. Potts58
Estimated H-index: 58
(University of Reading),
Jacobus C. Biesmeijer37
Estimated H-index: 37
(University of Leeds)
+ 3 AuthorsWilliam E. Kunin46
Estimated H-index: 46
(University of Leeds)
Pollinators are a key component of global biodiversity, providing vital ecosystem services to crops and wild plants. There is clear evidence of recent declines in both wild and domesticated pollinators, and parallel declines in the plants that rely upon them. Here we describe the nature and extent of reported declines, and review the potential drivers of pollinator loss, including habitat loss and fragmentation, agrochemicals, pathogens, alien species, climate change and the interactions between...
2,025 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2010in Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 2.51
Dennis vanEngelsdorp31
Estimated H-index: 31
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Marina Doris Meixner2
Estimated H-index: 2
Honey bees are a highly valued resource around the world. They are prized for their honey and wax production and depended upon for pollination of many important crops. While globally honey bee populations have been increasing, the rate of increase is not keeping pace with demand. Further, honey bee populations have not been increasing in all parts of the world, and have declined in many nations in Europe and in North America. Managed honey bee populations are influenced by many factors including...
543 Citations Source Cite
Cited By114
Newest
Published on Mar 26, 2019in Nature Communications 12.35
Gary D. Powney9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Claire Carvell21
Estimated H-index: 21
+ 4 AuthorsNick J. B. Isaac35
Estimated H-index: 35
Pollination is a critical ecosystem service underpinning the productivity of agricultural systems across the world. Wild insect populations provide a substantial contribution to the productivity of many crops and seed set of wild flowers. However, large-scale evidence on species-specific trends among wild pollinators are lacking. Here we show substantial inter-specific variation in pollinator trends, based on occupancy models for 353 wild bee and hoverfly species in Great Britain between 1980 an...
1 Citations Source Cite
Hens Runhaar23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UU: Utrecht University),
Piety Runhaar10
Estimated H-index: 10
(WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)
+ 3 AuthorsDavid Kleijn48
Estimated H-index: 48
(WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)
Source Cite
Published on May 3, 2019in Zemdirbyste-agriculture 0.75
Romualdas Zemeckis1
Estimated H-index: 1
(VMU: Vytautas Magnus University),
Anželika Dautartė (VMU: Vytautas Magnus University)+ 1 AuthorsJolanta Droždz (Vilnius University)
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Published on May 1, 2019in The Journal of Experimental Biology 3.18
Carolyn A. Sonter (UNE: University of New England (United States)), Romina Rader16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UNE: University of New England (United States)),
Susan C. Wilson14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UNE: University of New England (United States))
ABSTRACT Bees are in decline globally as a result of multiple stressors including pests, pathogens and contaminants. The management of bees in enclosures can identify causes of decline under standardized conditions but the logistics of conducting effect studies in typical systems used across several colonies is complex and costly. This study details a practicable, new and economical cage system that effectively houses live honey bee colonies to investigate the impact of physical conditions, biol...
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Published on Apr 29, 2019in Molecular Ecology Resources 7.06
Morgan Gueuning2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UniNE: University of Neuchâtel),
Dominik Ganser1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Bern)
+ 4 AuthorsJuerg E. Frey
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