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Antimycobacterial Activity of Some Commercially Available Plant-Derived Essential Oils

Published on Mar 1, 2015in Chemistry of Natural Compounds0.57
· DOI :10.1007/s10600-015-1281-0
J. A. Alves1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
André Luis Lembi Mantovani5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 4 AuthorsC.H.G. Martins5
Estimated H-index: 5
Cite
Abstract
Tuberculosis is part of a group of infectious diseases that together cause 90% of deaths worldwide [1]. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, infects approximately eight million new individuals per year and culminates in death every 10 seconds. Although the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared tuberculosis a global health emergency, its treatment lasts too long, infected patients have limited access to diagnosis, and multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis exist [2]. Moreover, there has been a significant increase in the number of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), such as M. kansasii and M. avium, which may affect the lungs, lymph, skin, and joints and lead to serious sequelae when not treated [3]. Thus, the search for new active molecules against mycobacteria is urgent. As part of our ongoing research on natural products as a source of new antimicrobial agents 4–7 , in this paper we investigate the antimycobacterial activity of 18 commercial plant-derived essential oils. We assessed the antimycobacterial activity of 18 essential oils against M. tuberculosis, M. avium, and M. kansasii by determining their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs, Table 1). Most of the essential oils were poorly active or inactive against M. tuberculosis, M. kansasii, and M. avium: MIC values ranged from 1000 to 2000 g mL–1 [8]. However, the essential oils of Amyris balsamifera and Citrus limonum exhibited moderate activity against M. tuberculosis (MIC 500 g mL–1) and M. avium (MIC 500 g mL–1); the essential oils of Cynnamomum zeylanicum, Citrus paradise, Thymus vulgaris, Citrus limonum, Citrus sinensis, and Zingiber officinale also presented moderate activity against M. avium (MIC 500 g mL–1). Amyris balsamifera was the most active against M. kansasii (MIC 250 g mL–1). Papers have described the antimicrobial activity of Amyris balsamifera against Staphylococcus aureus [9] and Klebsiella pneumoniae [10], but this is the first time that the antimycobacterial activity of a commercially available essential oil of A balsamifera has been assessed. We used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to determine the chemical composition of Amyris balsamifera. Table 2 lists the 10 main compounds identified in this oil. The major constituents of Amyris balsamifera were the sesquiterpenes 7-epi-eudesmol (23.6%), agarospirol (14.0%), -eudesmol (12.3%), hedycaryol (10.9%), and drimenol (5.3%). The commercially available A. balsamifera essential oil from the Netherlands [10] and Germany [11] also contains -eudesmol, as well as the sesquiterpenes valerianol, elemol, and guaiol, which were not detected or were minor constituents in the present study. The 18 essential oils tested in this study were purchased from Body & Mind Beautiful Aromatherapy (Franca, SP, Brazil); the essential oils and their corresponding batch numbers are as follows: Amyris balsamifera (Rutaceae) (125), Boswellia carteri Birdw. (Burseraceae) (118), Cedrus atlantica (Endl.) Manetti ex Carriere (Pinaceae) (101), Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume (Lauraceae) (099), Citrus bergamia Risso (Rutaceae) (114), Citrus limonum Risso (Rutaceae) (121), Citrus paradise Macfad. (Rutaceae) (145), Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck (Rutaceae) (100), Commiphora myrrha (T. Nees) Engl. (Burseraceae) (140), Copaifera officinalis (Jacq.) L. (Fabaceae) (128), Cupressus sempervirens L. (Cupressaceae) (126), Eucaliptus globulus Labill. (Myrtaceae) (125), Melaleuca auternifolia Cheel (Myrtaceae) (167), Pinus sylvestris L. (Pinaceae) (139), Pogostemom patchouli Pellet. (Lameaceae) (120), Salvia sclarea L. (Lamiaceae) (197), Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae) (137), and Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae) (253).
  • References (12)
  • Citations (4)
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References12
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2013in Natural Product Research2.00
Gabriela de Paula Aguiar9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Carlos Eduardo Carvalho9
Estimated H-index: 9
+ 7 AuthorsAntônio E. M. Crotti21
Estimated H-index: 21
The antibacterial activity of nine selected essential oils (EOs) against a panel of oral pathogens was investigated in terms of their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) by using the broth microdilution method. Most of the EOs displayed weak activity or were inactive against the selected oral pathogens, with MIC values ranging from 500 to 4000 μg/mL. However, the EO obtained from the leaves of Bidens sulphurea (Asteraceae) was found to display moderate activity against Streptococcus mutans ...
Published on Jul 1, 2012in Food Research International3.58
Pavel Kloucek13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CULS: Czech University of Life Sciences Prague),
Jakub Smid6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CULS: Czech University of Life Sciences Prague)
+ 3 AuthorsRoman Pavela30
Estimated H-index: 30
Abstract Among promising alternative methods to control food spoilage much attention is being paid to the use of essential oils (EOs), and lately also to their activity in vapor phase. Until now, no standard assay exists, and there are many methods used by different authors, but any of them is suitably adapted for fast screening of large quantities of samples. We have modified most commonly used disc volatilization method by using four-section Petri dish (PD, 90 mm diameter), large filter paper ...
Published on Mar 8, 2012in African Journal of Biotechnology
Rodrigo Lucarini10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Marcos Gomide Tozatti7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 5 AuthorsWilson Roberto Cunha27
Estimated H-index: 27
The antimycobacterial activity of an extract of Usnea steineri and of its major constituent (+)-usnic acid was evaluated against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (ATCC 27294), Mycobacterium kansasii (ATCC 12478) and Mycobacterium avium (ATCC 15769). The acetone extract (ACE) of U. steineri displayed promising minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 32 μg/ml against M. tuberculosis and 62 μg/ml against both M. kansasii and M. avium. The isolated compound (+)-usnic acid was even more effective ...
Published on Nov 1, 2011in Chemistry & Biodiversity1.45
Soraya C. Caixeta4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Lizandra G. Magalhães14
Estimated H-index: 14
+ 13 AuthorsDenise Crispim Tavares18
Estimated H-index: 18
c ), The chemical composition and the in vitro schistosomicidal effects of the essential oil of Plectranthus neochilus (PN-EO) grown in Southeast Brazil was studied. b-Caryophyllene (1; 28.23%), a-thujene (2; 12.22%), a-pinene (3; 12.63%), b-pinene (4; 6.19%), germacrene D (5; 5.36%), and caryophyllene oxide (6; 5.37%) were the major essential oil constituents. This chemical composition differed from that previously reported for specimens harvested in Africa. Concerning the in vitro schistosomic...
Published on Jul 15, 2010in Chemistry & Biodiversity1.45
Wagner A. Bernardes4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Rodrigo Lucarini10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 8 AuthorsMilton Groppo14
Estimated H-index: 14
(FFCLRP: Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto)
The in vitro inhibitory activity of crude EtOH/H2O extracts from the leaves and stems of Rosmarinus officinalis L. was evaluated against the following microorganisms responsible for initiating dental caries: Streptococcus mutans, S. salivarius, S. sobrinus, S. mitis, S. sanguinis, and Enterococcus faecalis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined with the broth microdilution method. The bioassay-guided fractionation of the leaf extract, which displayed the higher antibacterial ac...
Marcele A. Ferreira1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Tatiane C. de Carvalho8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 5 AuthorsAntônio E. M. Crotti21
Estimated H-index: 21
The antimicrobial activity of Aegiphila sellowiana Cham., Lamiaceae, against oral pathogens is reported. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) for inhibiting the microorganisms growth were determined using the broth microdilution method from the CLSI M7-A7 protocol. Chlorhexidine was used as the positive control. The ethanol crude extract of the aerial parts of A. sellowiana exhibited activity against the microorganisms tested in this work; however, the activity decreased after partition ...
Published on Jul 1, 2008in Tuberculosis2.79
Gopinath S. Palanisamy9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CSU: Colorado State University),
Erin E. Smith7
Estimated H-index: 7
(CSU: Colorado State University)
+ 3 AuthorsRandall J. Basaraba42
Estimated H-index: 42
(CSU: Colorado State University)
Summary Virulence is the measure of pathogenicity of a microorganism as determined by its ability to invade host tissues and to produce severe disease. In the low-dose aerosol guinea pig model the virulence of multiple strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was determined by measuring time of survival, bacterial loads in target organs, and the severity of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary lesions. Erdman K01, CSU93/CDC1551 and HN878 had shorter survival times compared to the common laboratory strain ...
Published on May 1, 2006in Flavour and Fragrance Journal1.38
Leopold Jirovetz26
Estimated H-index: 26
(University of Vienna),
Gerhard Buchbauer35
Estimated H-index: 35
(University of Vienna)
+ 6 AuthorsMargit Geissler14
Estimated H-index: 14
In total, eight samples of different sandalwoods [Amyris balsamifera L., Santalum album L. and Santalum spicatum (R.Br.) A.DC.] and a mixture of α- and β-santalols, as well as eugenol as reference compound, were tested by an agar dilution and agar diffusion method for their antimicrobial activities against the yeast Candida albicans, the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The main compou...
Published on Aug 1, 2005in Química Nova0.62
Marcus V. N. de Souza24
Estimated H-index: 24
(FIOCRUZ: Oswaldo Cruz Foundation),
Thatyana R. A. Vasconcelos7
Estimated H-index: 7
(FIOCRUZ: Oswaldo Cruz Foundation)
Approximately every minute, somewhere in the world four people die from tuberculosis (TB), an infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with about 3 million deaths per year. In spite of these problems, unfortunaly, it is about 40 years that a novel drug was last introduced on the market. Due to the rapid spread of multi-drug resistant TB strains, resistant against all major anti-tuberculosis drugs, and the recent resurgence of the incidence of tuberculosis in association with the human immunodefic...
Suely Yoko Mizuka Ueki12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Instituto Adolfo Lutz),
Maria Conceição Martins11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Instituto Adolfo Lutz)
+ 4 AuthorsLucilaine Ferrazoli17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Adolfo Lutz)
O genero Mycobacterium e constituido por especies do complexo M. tuberculosis e outras denominadas micobacterias nao-tuberculosas (MNT). Ate o momento, mais de cem MNT foram descritas. Os objetivos deste estudo foram avaliar a diversidade das especies de MNT identificadas no estado de Sao Paulo, no periodo de 1991 a 1997, que antecedeu a expansao da terapia anti-retroviral, e determinar a frequencia dos casos que atenderam alguns criterios bacteriologicos para o diagnostico das infeccoes causada...
Cited By4
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Journal of Ethnopharmacology3.41
Vanessa Pietrowski Baldin3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UEM: Universidade Estadual de Maringá),
Regiane Bertin de Lima Scodro9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UEM: Universidade Estadual de Maringá)
+ 7 AuthorsRosilene Fressatti Cardoso9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UEM: Universidade Estadual de Maringá)
Abstract Ethnopharmacological relevance Zingiber officinale (ginger) is a perennial herbaceous plant native in tropical Asia and generally cultivated in most American tropical countries with widespread use in popular medicine. Ginger essential oil (GEO) has been reported to exhibit several biological activities, such as antimicrobial. Aims of the study : The aim of this study was to determine the composition and the property of GEO and related fractions against Mtb and NTM, as well as their cyto...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Anais Da Academia Brasileira De Ciencias0.94
Regiane Gonçalves1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UFAM: Federal University of Amazonas),
Vanessa F.S. Ayres1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UFAM: Federal University of Amazonas)
+ 7 AuthorsAntônio E. M. Crotti21
Estimated H-index: 21
(USP: University of São Paulo)
Published on Nov 23, 2015
Fatemeh Erfanfar (Shiraz University of Medical Sciences), Hashem Montaseri7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Shiraz University of Medical Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsAyda Hosseinkhani3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Shiraz University of Medical Sciences)
Introduction : A drug dosage form contains excipients as well as active pharmaceutical ingredients. Formerly excipients were considered as inert components which were used by a formulator to provide suitable volume, weight and consistency of a dosage form. Today however, excipients are expected to perform multifunctional roles such as enhancing physical, chemical and microbial stability of the dosage form, improving the color or odor of the formulation and influencing the release and bioavailabi...
Eduardo J. Crevelin8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Soraya C. Caixeta4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 4 AuthorsAntônio E. M. Crotti21
Estimated H-index: 21
(USP: University of São Paulo)
This work used the broth microdilution method to investigate the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil obtained from the leaves of Plectranthus neochilus (PN-EO) against a representative panel of oral pathogens. We assessed the antimicrobial activity of this oil in terms of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). PN-EO displayed moderate activity against Enterococcus faecalis (MIC = 250 μg/mL) and Streptococcus salivarus (MIC = 250 μg/mL), significant activity against Streptococcus sob...