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Changes in trophic position affect rates of contaminant decline at two seabird colonies in the Canadian Arctic.

Published on May 1, 2015in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety4.53
· DOI :10.1016/j.ecoenv.2015.01.027
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Carleton University),
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Carleton University)
+ 2 AuthorsMark L. Mallory18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Acadia University)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract Some Arctic food web structures are being affected by climate change with potential consequences for long-term trends of environmental contaminants. We examined the effects of changes in trophic position of an Arctic-breeding seabird, the thick-billed murre ( Uria lomvia ), on declining rates of six major organochlorines (hexachlorobenzene, heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane, dieldrin, p,p ′-DDE and Σ 69 PCB) at two breeding colonies in the Canadian Arctic, one in northern Hudson Bay and one in the high Arctic. As a result of a change in diet, murres breeding in Hudson Bay lowered their trophic position during 1993–2013. After adjusting for the change in trophic position using egg δ 15 N values, the rates of decline in concentrations of all six organochlorines were reduced in the Hudson Bay murre eggs. In contrast, the murres at the high Arctic colony experienced an increase in trophic position which resulted in an increase in the rates of decline for all adjusted concentrations, except for p,p ′-DDE and Σ 69 PCB which remained relatively unchanged. This suggests that the dramatic reduction in emissions of these compounds during the 1970s/1980s had a greater influence on the time trends than changes in diet at the high Arctic colony. Linkages between climate change and food web processes are complex, and may have serious consequences for our understanding of contaminant temporal trends. Valid trends can be deduced only when these factors have been taken into account.
  • References (44)
  • Citations (13)
Cite
References44
Newest
Published on Nov 18, 2014in Environmental Science & Technology7.15
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
,
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
+ 2 AuthorsMark L. Mallory18
Estimated H-index: 18
Arctic ecosystems are changing in response to climate change and some Arctic food web structures are being affected in ways which may have potential consequences for the biomagnification of environmental contaminants. Here, we examined how a shift in diet of an Arctic seabird resulted in a change of trophic position and how that change affected exposure to mercury over time. The thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia), which breeds in the eastern Canadian Arctic, has been monitored for diet and environ...
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Marine Pollution Bulletin3.78
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Carleton University),
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Carleton University)
+ 5 AuthorsRobert J. Letcher66
Estimated H-index: 66
(Carleton University)
Abstract Twelve marine fish species collected from a thick-billed murre ( Uria lomvia ) breeding colony in northern Hudson Bay in the Canadian Arctic during 2007–2009 were analyzed for legacy organochlorines (e.g. PCBs, DDT), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), perfluorinated carboxylates (PFCAs) and sulfonates (PFSAs), and total mercury (Hg). No one species of prey fish had the highest levels across all contaminant groups analyzed. For the two pelagic fish species sampled, concentrations of...
Published on Jun 5, 2013in Arctic1.43
B. Britten Harter2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Kyle H. Elliott24
Estimated H-index: 24
+ 1 AuthorsGail K. Davoren23
Estimated H-index: 23
Although Arctic cod ( Boreogadus saida ) is widely recognized as an important trophic link to top predators in Arctic marine ecosystems, the challenges of conducting fieldwork in the Arctic make this species difficult to study. We establish some basic relationships to improve prey energetics modeling when only in-field parameters (e.g., fork length) can be measured. We investigated the intraspecific relationships among energy density, fork length, mass, and water content for Arctic cod captured ...
Published on Jan 9, 2013in Marine Ecology Progress Series2.36
Laura McFarlane Tranquilla12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
William A. Montevecchi46
Estimated H-index: 46
+ 7 AuthorsRichard A. Phillips47
Estimated H-index: 47
Limited knowledge of year-round seabird distributions hinders efforts to assess consequences of anthropogenic threats and climate-induced changes in the marine environment. In particular, there is urgent need to understand how populations from different breeding colonies share and partition ocean habitat. Using geolocators, we identified winter habitat use patterns of 115 adult murres Uria spp. from 7 colonies, spanning the eastern Canadian coast from the high Arctic to Newfoundland, during 2007...
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts2.69
Frank F. Rigét45
Estimated H-index: 45
(AU: Aarhus University),
Katrin Vorkamp26
Estimated H-index: 26
(AU: Aarhus University)
+ 2 AuthorsRune Dietz48
Estimated H-index: 48
(AU: Aarhus University)
Temporal trends of selected POPs (PCB-52 and 153, p,p′-DDE, HCB, α- and β-HCH) in blubber of ringed seals (Pusa hispida) collected from the early 1990s to 2010 from central West Greenland were studied. In this period, the climate of Greenland warmed and the influences of climate indices such as winter sea-ice coverage (November–May), the number of sea-ice days during winter in Disko Bay, water temperature and salinity at Fyllas Banke during the preceding summer and the Arctic Oscillation Index (...
Published on Oct 1, 2012in Journal of Ornithology
Allison T. Moody7
Estimated H-index: 7
(U of S: University of Saskatchewan),
Keith A. Hobson85
Estimated H-index: 85
(U of S: University of Saskatchewan),
Anthony J. Gaston15
Estimated H-index: 15
(EC: Environment Canada)
Arctic ecosystems are especially vulnerable to anthropogenic influences including increasing contaminant levels and climatic change. To predict effects of these changes, it is important to understand trophic relationships of arctic organisms and how they change in response to environmental perturbations, especially those involving changes in sea-ice extent. We investigated feeding ecology of four seabird species, Thick-billed Murres (Uria lomvia), Northern Fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis), Black-leg...
Published on Sep 1, 2012in Ices Journal of Marine Science3.37
Anthony J. Gaston15
Estimated H-index: 15
(EC: Environment Canada),
Paul A. Smith18
Estimated H-index: 18
(EC: Environment Canada),
Jennifer F. Provencher14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UVic: University of Victoria)
Arctic ice cover has changed strikingly since the mid-1990s, with the minimum ice extent in the northern hemisphere diminishing by 8.5% per decade since 1981. In the Canadian Arctic, ice cover in June and November showed a step change in the mid-1990s, with little reduction before that. There was a similar step change in northern Hudson Bay. A long-term dataset on marine birds at Coats Island, Nunavut, revealed that many changes in seabird biology also exhibited an abrupt change at, or soon afte...
Published on May 21, 2012in Marine Ecology Progress Series2.36
Jennifer F. Provencher14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UVic: University of Victoria),
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
+ 1 AuthorsH.G. Gilchrist7
Estimated H-index: 7
Seabird diet indicates changing Arctic marine communities in eastern Canada J. F. Provencher*, A. J. Gaston, P. D. O’Hara, H. G. Gilchrist Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3N5, Canada Science and Technology Branch, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3, Canada Canadian Wildlife Service, Sidney, British Columbia V8L 4B2, Canada
Published on May 21, 2012in Marine Ecology Progress Series2.36
Ine Dorresteijn13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Alexander S. Kitaysky33
Estimated H-index: 33
+ 4 AuthorsRebecca C. Young9
Estimated H-index: 9
Climate change might affect marine top predators by altering availability and nutritional quality of their prey. Climate effects vary on a regional basis, and our understanding of the relationships between fluctuations in climate and food resources in sub-arctic regions with seasonal ice cover is limited. We studied the effects of inter-annual climate variability (as reflected in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, PDO, and the timing of the winter ice retreat) on zooplankton– planktivorous predato...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Science of The Total Environment5.59
Gary A. Stern38
Estimated H-index: 38
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Robie W. Macdonald66
Estimated H-index: 66
(UM: University of Manitoba)
+ 8 AuthorsFeiyue Wang39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UM: University of Manitoba)
Abstract Recent studies have shown that climate change is already having significant impacts on many aspects of transport pathways, speciation and cycling of mercury within Arctic ecosystems. For example, the extensive loss of sea-ice in the Arctic Ocean and the concurrent shift from greater proportions of perennial to annual types have been shown to promote changes in primary productivity, shift foodweb structures, alter mercury methylation and demethylation rates, and influence mercury distrib...
Cited By13
Newest
Published on Jun 13, 2019in Toxics
Joanna Burger67
Estimated H-index: 67
,
Nellie Tsipoura9
Estimated H-index: 9
+ 3 AuthorsMichael Gochfeld51
Estimated H-index: 51
Understanding the relationship between heavy metal and selenium levels in biota and their foods is important, but often difficult to determine because animals eat a variety of organisms. Yet such information is critical to managing species populations, ecological integrity, and risk to receptors (including humans) from consumption of certain prey. We examine levels of cadmium, lead, mercury, and selenium in biota from Delaware Bay (New Jersey, USA) to begin construction of a “springtime” food we...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Science of The Total Environment5.59
Frank F. Rigét45
Estimated H-index: 45
(AU: Aarhus University),
Anders Bignert34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Swedish Museum of Natural History)
+ 15 AuthorsJohn R. Kucklick34
Estimated H-index: 34
(NIST: National Institute of Standards and Technology)
Abstract More than 1000 time-series of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Arctic biota from marine and freshwater ecosystems some extending back to the beginning of 1980s were analyzed using a robust statistical method. The Arctic area encompassed extended from Alaska, USA in the west to northern Scandinavian in the east, with data gaps for Arctic Russia and Arctic Finland. The aim was to investigate whether temporal trends for different animal groups and matrices were consistent across a l...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Science of The Total Environment5.59
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Carleton University),
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Carleton University),
Mark L. Mallory3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Acadia University)
Abstract We compared temporal trends of legacy organochlorine pesticides and PCBs in eggs of five seabird species breeding at Prince Leopold Island in the Canadian high Arctic. Concentrations of most of the major organochlorine groups/compounds have either declined (e.g. Σ 35 PCB, ΣDDT, ΣCBz, ΣCHL, octachlorostyrene) or shown no consistent directional change (e.g. heptachlor epoxide) since 1975 in eggs of thick-billed murres ( Uria lomvia ), northern fulmars ( Fulmarus glacialis ) and black-legg...
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Global Change Biology8.88
Juan José Alava13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UBC: University of British Columbia),
William W. L. Cheung40
Estimated H-index: 40
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
+ 1 AuthorsU. Rashid Sumaila29
Estimated H-index: 29
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
Climate change is reshaping the way in which contaminants move through the global environment, in large part by changing the chemistry of the oceans and affecting the physiology, health, and feeding ecology of marine biota. Climate change-associated impacts on structure and function of marine food webs, with consequent changes in contaminant transport, fate, and effects, are likely to have significant repercussions to those human populations that rely on fisheries resources for food, recreation,...
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Environmental Pollution5.71
Sara Pedro4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UConn: University of Connecticut),
Aaron T. Fisk47
Estimated H-index: 47
(U of W: University of Windsor)
+ 4 AuthorsMelissa A. McKinney19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UConn: University of Connecticut)
Abstract Contaminant dynamics within Arctic marine food webs may be altered through the climate-driven northward invasions of temperate/boreal species. Here, we compare tissue concentrations of total mercury (THg) and legacy and emerging persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in native versus invading forage species sampled from 2012 to 2014 near Arviat, Clyde River, and Resolute Bay, NU, representing, low, mid- and high eastern Canadian Arctic regions, respectively. Concentrations of THg, legacy ...
Published on Apr 4, 2017in Environmental Science & Technology7.15
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
,
Derek C. G. Muir94
Estimated H-index: 94
There are relatively few studies of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) for biota in polar regions and even fewer reports of temporal trends. We determined concentrations of PCNs in eggs of thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) collected from the Canadian high Arctic between 1975 and 2014 and calculated their associated toxic equivalents (TEQs). Concentrations of Σ67PCN decreased significantly in the murre eggs between 1975 and 2014 at an average annual rate of −14.9 pg g–1 wet weight. Although the ...
Published on Jan 1, 2017
Kyle H. Elliott8
Estimated H-index: 8
(McGill University),
James D. Roth18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Kevin A. Crook3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UM: University of Manitoba)
Published on Oct 1, 2016in Environmental Pollution5.71
Frank F. Rigét45
Estimated H-index: 45
(AU: Aarhus University),
Katrin Vorkamp26
Estimated H-index: 26
(AU: Aarhus University)
+ 3 AuthorsRune Dietz48
Estimated H-index: 48
(AU: Aarhus University)
The Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) is a working group under the Arctic Council with the aim to monitor and assess temporal trends of contaminants in Arctic ecosystems. The Greenland AMAP Core programme was established to contribute to this effort. The Core programme includes three main components; routine monitoring, retrospective studies and new POP screening studies. The programme is based on an adaptive approach, which has led to changes throughout the years. An overview of...
Published on May 19, 2016in PLOS ONE2.78
Sabrina Tartu5
Estimated H-index: 5
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute),
Sophie Bourgeon15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
+ 5 AuthorsHeli Routti12
Estimated H-index: 12
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
Global changes are thought to affect most Arctic species, yet some populations are more at risk. Today, the Barents Sea ecoregion is suffering the strongest sea ice retreat ever measured; and these changes are suspected to modify food access and thus diet of several species. Biochemical diet tracers enable investigation of diet in species such as polar bears (Ursus maritimus). We examined individual diet variation of female polar bears in Svalbard, Norway, and related it to year, season (spring ...
Published on Apr 1, 2016in Environmental Pollution5.71
Jérôme Fort18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique),
David Grémillet5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Montpellier)
+ 2 AuthorsPaco Bustamante40
Estimated H-index: 40
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Abstract Studying long-term trends of contaminants in Arctic biota is essential to better understand impacts of anthropogenic activities and climate change on the exposure of sensitive species and marine ecosystems. We concurrently measured temporal changes (2006–2014) in mercury (Hg) contamination of little auks ( Alle alle ; the most abundant Arctic seabird) and in their major zooplankton prey species ( Calanoid copepods, Themisto libellula, Gammarus spp.). We found an increasing contamination...