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Comparison between aerobic and flooded rice in the tropics: Agronomic performance in an eight-season experiment

Published on Apr 1, 2006in Field Crops Research3.87
· DOI :10.1016/j.fcr.2005.07.007
Shaobing Peng8
Estimated H-index: 8
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute),
B.A.M. Bouman42
Estimated H-index: 42
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute)
+ 3 AuthorsHong-Kyu Park6
Estimated H-index: 6
(RDA: Rural Development Administration)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract Yield penalty and yield stability of aerobic rice have to be considered before promoting this water-saving technology in the tropics. The objectives of this study were (1) to compare crop performance between aerobic and flooded rice continuously over several seasons, and (2) to identify yield attributes responsible for the yield gap between aerobic and flooded rice. Field experiments were conducted at the International Rice Research Institute farm in dry and wet seasons. Grain yield and its components were compared between aerobic and flooded rice continuously for eight seasons from 2001 to 2004 using the best available aerobic rice varieties in the tropics. The yield difference between aerobic and flooded rice ranged from 8 to 69% depending on the number of seasons that aerobic rice has been continuously grown, dry and wet seasons, and varieties. When the first-season aerobic rice was compared with flooded rice, the yield difference was 8–21%. The yield difference between aerobic and flooded rice was attributed more to difference in biomass production than to harvest index. Among the yield components, sink size (spikelets per m 2 ) contributed more to the yield gap between aerobic and flooded rice than grain filling percentage and 1000-grain weight. Yield decline was observed when aerobic rice was continuously grown and the decline was greater in the dry season than in the wet season. The yield decline of aerobic rice was attributed more to changes in biomass production than in harvest index. Our data suggest that new aerobic rice varieties with minimum yield gap compared with flooded rice and crop management strategies that can reverse the yield decline of continuous aerobic rice have to be developed before aerobic rice technology can be adopted in large areas in the tropics.
  • References (17)
  • Citations (157)
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References17
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2005in Agricultural Water Management3.54
B.A.M. Bouman42
Estimated H-index: 42
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute),
Shaobing Peng46
Estimated H-index: 46
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute)
+ 1 AuthorsRomeo M. Visperas23
Estimated H-index: 23
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute)
Abstract Increasing water scarcity necessitates the development of irrigated rice systems that require less water than traditional flooded rice. In irrigated aerobic rice systems, rice grows in nonflooded and nonsaturated soil under supplemental irrigation. The development of such systems should start with the identification of promising varieties and the quantification of yield potential, water use, field water outflows, and water productivity. In this paper, we report on the results of growing...
Published on Jan 1, 2003
T. P. Tuong1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
B.A.M. Bouman42
Estimated H-index: 42
Rice production in Asia needs to increase to feed a growing population. Though a complete assessment of the level of water scarcity in Asian rice production is still lacking, there are signs that declining quality of water and declining availability of water resources are threatening the sustainability of the irrigated rice-based production system. Drought is one of the main constraints for high yield in rain-fed rice. Exploring ways to produce more rice with less water is essential for food sec...
Published on Jul 1, 2002in Agricultural Water Management3.54
D. F. Tabbal2
Estimated H-index: 2
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute),
B.A.M. Bouman42
Estimated H-index: 42
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute)
+ 2 AuthorsM.A. Sattar1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Bangladesh Rice Research Institute)
Abstract Traditional transplanted rice with continuous standing water in Asia has relatively high water inputs. Because of increasing water scarcity, there is a need to develop alternative systems that require less water. This paper reports results of on-farm experiments in the Philippines to reduce water input by water-saving irrigation techniques and alternative crop establishment methods, such as wet and dry seeding. With continuous standing water, direct wet-seeded rice yielded higher than t...
Published on May 1, 2002in Field Crops Research3.87
H. R. Lafitte10
Estimated H-index: 10
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute),
Brigitte Courtois35
Estimated H-index: 35
,
M. Arraudeau1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract Genetic improvement of rice for aerobic (non-flooded) environments has received less attention than breeding for lowland production systems. Aerobic rice has traditionally been grown in low-input systems, but as fresh water for irrigation becomes increasingly scarce, aerobic rice cultivation is expected to expand into regions with more intensive cropping. The primary yield constraints for the low-input aerobic crop include water deficit, acid and infertile soils, weed competition, and d...
Published on Mar 1, 2002in Agricultural Systems4.13
Willem A. Stoop6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Rice University),
Norman Uphoff36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Cornell University),
Amir Kassam10
Estimated H-index: 10
(CGIAR)
Abstract The “system of rice intensification” (SRI) that evolved in the 1980s and 1990s in Madagascar permits resource-limited farmers to realise yields of up to 15 t of paddy/hectare on infertile soils, with greatly reduced rates of irrigation and without external inputs. This paper reviews the plant physiological and bio-ecological factors associated with agronomic practices that could explain the extraordinary yields in terms of synergies resulting from the judicious management of the major c...
Published on Jan 1, 2002in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter2.71
B.A.M. Bouman42
Estimated H-index: 42
,
H. Hengsdijk22
Estimated H-index: 22
+ 3 AuthorsJ.K. Ladha1
Estimated H-index: 1
Rice is a profligate user of water. It takes 3,000–5,000 liters to produce 1 kilogram of rice, which is about 2 to 3 times more than to produce 1 kilogram of other cereals such as wheat or maize. Until recently, this amount of water has been taken for granted. Now, however, the water crisis threatens the sustainability of the irrigated rice ecosystem. In Asia, 17 million ha of irrigated rice areas may experience ‘physical water scarcity’ and 22 million ha ‘economic water scarcity’ by 2025. To sa...
Published on Jan 1, 2002
B.A.M. Bouman42
Estimated H-index: 42
(CGIAR),
Yang Xiaoguang7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 3 AuthorsWang1
Estimated H-index: 1
Traditional lowland rice with continuous flooding in Asia has relatively high water inputs. Because of increasing water scarcity, there is a need to develop alternative systems that require less water. "Aerobic rice" is a new concept of growing rice: it is high-yielding rice grown in non-puddled, aerobic soils under irrigation and high external inputs. To make aerobic rice successful, new varieties and management practices must be developed. Results are reported of field experiments and farmer-p...
Published on Jan 1, 2002in Agronomy Journal1.80
Thomas George11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UH: University of Hawaii),
Roger Magbanua1
Estimated H-index: 1
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute)
+ 2 AuthorsJonathan Quiton1
Estimated H-index: 1
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute)
Upland rice (Oryza sativa L.), commonly considered to be low yielding, can be high yielding if the genotype is improved for harvest index (HI) and the crop is grown relatively free from nutrient and drought stresses. We examined whether high and stable rice yields could be obtained in aerobic soil. In four experiments of 1- to 3-yr duration, lime, N, and P were inputs for wet-season upland rice 'UPLRi-5' in a favorable rainfed Oxisol. In a 3-yr experiment consisting of two crops per year in an i...
Published on Jul 1, 2001in Agricultural Water Management3.54
B.A.M. Bouman42
Estimated H-index: 42
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute),
T.P Tuong1
Estimated H-index: 1
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute)
Abstract Rice production in Asia needs to increase to feed a growing population whereas water for irrigation is getting scarcer. Major challenges are to (i) save water; (ii) increase water productivity and (iii) produce more rice with less water. This study analyzes the ways in which water-saving irrigation can help to meet these challenges at the field level. The analyses are conducted using experimental data collected mostly in central–northern India and the Philippines. Water input can be red...
Cited By157
Newest
Published on Mar 7, 2019in Rice3.51
Prathibha Dharmappa1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UASD: University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad),
Pushpa Doddaraju (UASD: University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad)+ 8 AuthorsMakarla Udayakumar20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UASD: University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad)
Background Semi-irrigated aerobic cultivation of rice has been suggested as a potential water saving agronomy. However, suitable cultivars are needed in order to sustain yield levels. An introgression of water mining and water use efficiency (WUE) traits is the most appropriate strategy for a comprehensive genetic enhancement to develop such rice cultivars.
Published on Oct 1, 2019in Geoderma4.34
Setia S. Girsang (IRRI: International Rice Research Institute), James R. Quilty8
Estimated H-index: 8
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute)
+ 2 AuthorsRoland J. Buresh36
Estimated H-index: 36
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute)
Abstract Production of irrigated rice ( Oryza sativa L.) without conventional soil submergence may increase water use efficiency but risk a decline in rice yield. Spatial variability in rice yield and relationships among yield and soil properties were examined across a 3.3-ha experimental site after uniform crop management. The site was initially consolidated from small, previously puddled parcels of land into eight laser-leveled plots across a 2.1-m elevation gradient in the Philippines. Six cr...
Published on Aug 1, 2019in Agricultural Water Management3.54
Tao Song2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong),
Feiyun Xu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University)
+ 5 AuthorsWeifeng Xu4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University)
Abstract As one of the most widely promoted effective irrigation strategies for rice, alternate wetting and drying (AWD) irrigation can not only reduce water use but also increase mineral nutrient use efficiency. In this research, we compared the differences in grain yield, grain quality, phosphorus use efficiency (PUE), and growth states of roots and shoots of lowland and upland rice cultivars that were subjected to different irrigation and phosphorus (P) fertilizer application treatments in a ...
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Field Crops Research3.87
Cosmas Wacal (Tottori University), Naoki Ogata (National Agriculture and Food Research Organization)+ 6 AuthorsEiji Nishihara11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Tottori University)
Abstract Sesame ( Sesamum indicum L.) is an important oilseed crop that is negatively affected by continuous cropping but there is still limited research on this phenomenon. A three-year field experiment was conducted from 2012 to 2014 at Tottori, Japan, on an upland field converted from a paddy to determine the effect of continuous cropping on seed yield, crude protein and mineral nutrient contents of four sesame cultivars (‘Maruhime’, ‘Nishikimaru’, ‘Gomazou’, ‘Masekin’) and identify cultivars...
Published on Feb 15, 2019in Frontiers in Plant Science4.11
Nitika Sandhu7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Ram Baran Yadaw5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 13 AuthorsMangat Ram1
Estimated H-index: 1
With the changing climatic conditions and reducing labor-water availability, the potential contribution of aerobic rice varieties and cultivation system to develop a sustainable rice based agri-food system has never been more important than today. Keeping in mind the goal of identifying high-yielding aerobic rice varieties for wider adaptation, a set of aerobic rice breeding lines were developed and evaluated for grain yield, plant height and days to 50% flowering in 23 experiments conducted acr...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Annals of Applied Biology1.61
Hayat Ullah5
Estimated H-index: 5
(AIT: Asian Institute of Technology),
Abdulhamid Mohammadi1
Estimated H-index: 1
(AIT: Asian Institute of Technology),
Avishek Datta14
Estimated H-index: 14
(AIT: Asian Institute of Technology)
Published on Apr 3, 2018in Plant Production Science1.23
Stella Owusu-Nketia2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Nagoya University),
Yoshiaki Inukai24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Business International Corporation)
+ 9 AuthorsKabuki Takuya1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Nagoya University)
AbstractIn rainfed lowland rice ecosystem, rice plants are often exposed to alternating recurrences of waterlogging and drought due to erratic rainfall. Such soil moisture fluctuation (SMF) which is completely different from simple or progressive drought could be stressful for plant growth, thereby causing reduction in yield. Root plasticity is one of the key traits that play important roles for plant adaptation under such conditions. This study aimed to evaluate root plasticity expression and i...
Published on Apr 1, 2018in Current Plant Biology
Rohit Joshi13
Estimated H-index: 13
(GBPUA&T: G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology),
Rohit Joshi1
Estimated H-index: 1
(GBPUA&T: G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology)
+ 0 AuthorsAlok Shukla10
Estimated H-index: 10
(GBPUA&T: G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology)
Abstract All the irrigated rice systems are currently facing a worldwide challenge for producing higher yield with lower water availability. Aerobic rice is considered to be promising for rice production under water constrained environments where it can be grown under non-flooded and unsaturated soil. All practices for aerobic rice cultivation must start by first identifying promising rice varieties that are expected to produce higher grain yield under such conditions. Therefore, we conducted a ...
Published on Apr 1, 2018in European Journal of Agronomy3.38
Andre Reis1
Estimated H-index: 1
(USP: University of São Paulo),
Ana Vasconcelos4
Estimated H-index: 4
(USP: University of São Paulo)
+ 3 AuthorsJosé Laércio Favarin14
Estimated H-index: 14
(USP: University of São Paulo)
Abstract Aerobic rice is a promising rice production system which enables rice to grow in water-constrained environments and provides an alternative to continuous flooding irrigation. Although significant water savings are reported in aerobic systems in different lowland regions, a negative impact in crop performance prevents its wide deployment. The main reasons for grain yield decreases are given to be genotype and inappropriate water supply. However, agronomic practices such nitrogen manageme...
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