Match!

Plasticity of noddy parents and offspring to sea-surface temperature anomalies.

Published on Jul 29, 2010in PLOS ONE2.78
· DOI :10.1371/journal.pone.0011891
Carol A. Devney5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Australian Institute of Marine Science),
M. Julian Caley30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Australian Institute of Marine Science),
Bradley C. Congdon20
Estimated H-index: 20
(JCU: James Cook University)
Cite
Abstract
Behavioral and/or developmental plasticity is crucial for resisting the impacts of environmental stressors. We investigated the plasticity of adult foraging behavior and chick development in an offshore foraging seabird, the black noddy (Anous minutus), during two breeding seasons. The first season had anomalously high sea-surface temperatures and ‘low’ prey availability, while the second was a season of below average sea-surface temperatures and ‘normal’ food availability. During the second season, supplementary feeding of chicks was used to manipulate offspring nutritional status in order to mimic conditions of high prey availability. When sea-surface temperatures were hotter than average, provisioning rates were significantly and negatively impacted at the day-to-day scale. Adults fed chicks during this low-food season smaller meals but at the same rate as chicks in the unfed treatment the following season. Supplementary feeding of chicks during the second season also resulted in delivery of smaller meals by adults, but did not influence feeding rate. Chick begging and parental responses to cessation of food supplementation suggested smaller meals fed to artificially supplemented chicks resulted from a decrease in chick demands associated with satiation, rather than adult behavioral responses to chick condition. During periods of low prey abundance, chicks maintained structural growth while sacrificing body condition and were unable to take advantage of periods of high prey abundance by increasing growth rates. These results suggest that this species expresses limited plasticity in provisioning behavior and offspring development. Consequently, responses to future changes in sea-surface temperature and other environmental variation may be limited.
  • References (60)
  • Citations (14)
Cite
References60
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 1969
James Pinson Ludwig1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
M. J. Ashmole1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
N. P. Ashmole1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on May 1, 2009in The American Naturalist3.85
Veronika Bókony21
Estimated H-index: 21
,
Ádám Z. Lendvai19
Estimated H-index: 19
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
+ 3 AuthorsOlivier Chastel50
Estimated H-index: 50
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
In vertebrates, stressors such as starvation or predator attacks stimulate the rapid elevation of circulating glucocorticoid hormones, triggering physiological and behavioral responses that aid immediate survival but simultaneously inhibit reproduction. This stress response has been proposed to serve as a physiological mediator of life-history trade-offs: when the value of current reproduction is high relative to the value of future reproduction and survival, a mitigated stress response is expec...
Published on Mar 1, 2009in Journal of Animal Ecology4.36
Thomas E. Reed18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh),
Pete Warzybok8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 3 AuthorsWilliam J. Sydeman45
Estimated H-index: 45
1. In order to reproduce successfully in a temporally varying environment, iteroparous animals must exhibit considerable behavioural flexibility across their lifetimes. By adjusting timing of breeding each year, parents can ensure optimal overlap between the energy intensive period of offspring production and the seasonal peak in favourable environmental conditions, thereby increasing their chances of successfully rearing young. 2. Few studies investigate variation among individuals in how they ...
Published on Jun 28, 2008in Ibis1.99
N. P. Ashmole1
Estimated H-index: 1
SUMMARY Several colonies of Black Noddies Anous tenuirostris on Boatswain Bird Island, off Ascension, were studied for almost a year, including the whole of one breeding period and the start of another. Between the breeding periods the noddies roosted on their ledges in the breeding colonies, so observations could be made throughout the year. The single eggs were laid on small ledges, usually on steep cliffs; nest material was scarce, and some eggs fell off the ledges during incubation, but many...
Published on Jun 28, 2008in Ibis1.99
Henri Weimerskirch76
Estimated H-index: 76
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique),
P. A. Prince33
Estimated H-index: 33
(BAS: British Antarctic Survey),
L. Zimmermann4
Estimated H-index: 4
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
We examined the provisioning strategy of a long-lived seabird to test the prediction from life-history theory that adults should preferentially allocate resources towards their own needs rather than towards their offspring, and to test the abilities of adults to regulate provisioning according to the chick needs. The individual provisioning behaviour of Yellow-nosed Albatrosses Diomedea chlororhynchos was studied, costs of flight being increased by adding a weight handicap to foraging parents, a...
Published on Apr 3, 2008in Ibis1.99
Yolanda van Heezik18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Otago),
Lloyd S. Davis11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Otago)
Effects of a change of diet on growth rates and fledging sizes of Yellow-eyed Penguins Megadyptes antipodes were examined at two breeding areas on South Island, New Zealand, during two breeding seasons. An adverse change in diet was observed in the second season. Evidence for this included depressed growth rates of weight, differential growth of weight and most morphometric parameters between one- and two-chick nests in the second season, lower fledging weights, lower adult body weights, delayed...
Published on Jan 27, 2008in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B6.14
Richard Shine98
Estimated H-index: 98
,
Gregory P. Brown40
Estimated H-index: 40
In the wet–dry tropics of northern Australia, temperatures are high and stable year-round but monsoonal rainfall is highly seasonal and variable both annually and spatially. Many features of reproduction in vertebrates of this region may be adaptations to dealing with this unpredictable variation in precipitation, notably by (i) using direct proximate (rainfall-affected) cues to synchronize the timing and extent of breeding with rainfall events, (ii) placing the eggs or offspring in conditions w...
Published on May 1, 2007in Journal of Evolutionary Biology2.54
Daniel H. Nussey34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Cambridge),
Alastair J. Wilson43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh),
Jon E. Brommer35
Estimated H-index: 35
(UH: University of Helsinki)
The ability of individual organisms to alter morphological and life-history traits in response to the conditions they experience is an example of phenotypic plasticity which is fundamental to any population's ability to deal with short-term environmental change. We currently know little about the prevalence, and evolutionary and ecological causes and consequences of variation in life history plasticity in the wild. Here we outline an analytical framework, utilizing the reaction norm concept and ...
Published on May 1, 2007in Journal of Avian Biology2.23
Petra Quillfeldt29
Estimated H-index: 29
(MPG: Max Planck Society),
Ian J. Strange16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Juan Francisco Masello26
Estimated H-index: 26
(MPG: Max Planck Society)
Seabirds are important predators in marine ecosystems and are commonly used to monitor the productivity of their marine environments. However, different measures of seabird breeding success differ in their sensitivity to environmental conditions. Here, we present an analysis of provisioning rates and chick growth as well as hatching and fledging success, in thin-billed prions Pachyptila belcheri at New Island, Falkland Islands between 2003 and 2005 and relate these patterns to ocean climate. Dur...
Published on Feb 16, 2007in Marine Ecology Progress Series2.36
Carol A. Erwin3
Estimated H-index: 3
(JCU: James Cook University),
Bradley C. Congdon20
Estimated H-index: 20
Many seabird species threatened by global climate change are found mainly or exclusively in tropical regions. A shortage of long-term data linking climatic variation, oceanography and tropical seabird reproductive biology at both within- and between-season temporal scales means that the potential impact of climate change on these species is largely unknown. The sooty tern Sterna fuscata, an almost ubiquitous tropical seabird, has been declining on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia, over th...
Cited By14
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Pacific Conservation Biology
J.M. Shephard7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Murdoch University),
J.N. Dunlop6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Willem Bouten41
Estimated H-index: 41
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
Increasingly, space use by foraging seabirds is being used as an indicator of ocean condition to inform projected planning for climate change, fisheries management and marine protected areas. We tracked foraging common noddies (Anous stolidus) from a colony in the East Indian Ocean using back-mounted solar GPS trackers during incubation and chick rearing to evaluate their suitability as biomonitors of ocean condition, and the overlap of flight tracks with marine protected area boundaries. This i...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Marine ornithology
Fiona McDuie3
Estimated H-index: 3
(JCU: James Cook University),
Scarla J. Weeks29
Estimated H-index: 29
+ 1 AuthorsBradley C. Congdon20
Estimated H-index: 20
To determine whether breeding tropical shearwaters use “at-distance” locations during the long-trip phase of their bimodal foraging cycle, we deployed PTT satellite tracking devices on adult Wedge-tailed Shearwaters Ardenna pacifica of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia, over three breeding seasons. During the long-trip phase (8–14 d), a component of a bimodal pattern of foraging not seen previously in a tropical shearwater, birds travelled to distant sites in the Coral Sea between 300 and ...
Published on Feb 1, 2014in Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science2.61
David Monticelli9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UC: University of Coimbra),
Jaime A. Ramos28
Estimated H-index: 28
(UC: University of Coimbra)
+ 2 AuthorsVitor H. Paiva17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UC: University of Coimbra)
Abstract Most attempts to link seabirds and climate/oceanographic effects have concerned the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with comparatively few studies in the tropical Indian Ocean. This paper examines the reproductive response of the lesser noddy Anous tenuirostris to temporal fluctuations in oceanographic and climatic conditions using 8 years of monitoring data from Aride Island (Seychelles), tropical Western Indian Ocean. We tested the hypothesis that breeding parameters (mean hatching date, ...
Published on Jan 1, 2014in International Journal of Ecology
Johanna E. Johnson7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Neil J. Holbrook28
Estimated H-index: 28
The challenges that climate change poses for marine ecosystems are already manifesting in impacts at the species, population, and community levels in Australia, particularly in Tasmania and tropical northern Australia. Many species and habitats are already under threat as a result of human activities, and the additional pressure from climate change significantly increases the challenge for marine conservation and management. Climate change impacts are expected to magnify as sea surface temperatu...
Published on Nov 19, 2013in Climate Research1.98
Peter Dann21
Estimated H-index: 21
,
Lynda E. Chambers19
Estimated H-index: 19
Using a 40 yr demographic database of little penguins Eudyptula minor, we investi- gated anticipated impacts of climatic changes on the penguin population at Phillip Island, south- eastern Australia, and the potential economic impact on the associated tourism industry over the next century. We project a small loss of penguin breeding habitat due to sea level rise, although breeding habitat is unlikely to be limiting over this period. However, some erosion in the vicinity of tourism infrastructur...
Published on Sep 17, 2013in Marine Ecology Progress Series2.36
Scarla J. Weeks29
Estimated H-index: 29
,
Craig Steinberg15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Bradley C. Congdon20
Estimated H-index: 20
Previously we have demonstrated that prey availability to seabirds of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) decreases in direct association with within-season increases in sea-surface temperature, independent of prevailing El Nino conditions. These negative impacts occur throughout the GBR and affect multiple seabird species. Currently, the oceanic processes driving these impacts or the potential for them to occur in other marine systems are unknown. Here, we use satellite and in situ data obtained durin...
Published on Sep 4, 2013in PLOS ONE2.78
Sergio Ancona5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UNAM: National Autonomous University of Mexico),
Hugh Drummond32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UNAM: National Autonomous University of Mexico)
Food shortage and other challenges associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) experienced early in life may have long-term impacts on life history traits, but these potential impacts remain virtually unexplored. By monitoring 2556 blue-footed boobies from 11 cohorts, we showed that birds facing warm water ENSO conditions (and probably low food availability) in the natal year were underweight at fledging, recruited earlier and bred less frequently, but showed no deficit in longevity or b...
Published on Jun 27, 2013in Marine Ecology Progress Series2.36
Fiona McDuie3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
William Goulding1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsBradley C. Congdon20
Estimated H-index: 20
Mechanisms of population divergence in seabirds are poorly understood. We evaluated whether divergent patterns of chick development among wedge-tailed shearwater Puffinus pacificus populations are facultative responses to short-term fluctuations in food availability, or fixed colony-specific phenomena potentially associated with differences in local resource availability. Supplementary feeding at Heron Island increased food intake to levels equal to, or greater than, those observed at Lord Howe ...
Published on May 1, 2013in Marine Biology2.13
Teresa Catry15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Lisbon),
Jaime A. Ramos28
Estimated H-index: 28
(UC: University of Coimbra)
+ 2 AuthorsJosé P. Granadeiro27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Lisbon)
We investigated inter-annual variability in the breeding performance of six tropical seabirds with different life histories. We further examined the extent to which presumed differences among years in food availability to seabirds were related to large-scale oceanic processes (El Nino Southern Oscillation and Indian Ocean Dipole) or local features around the colony (Sea Surface Temperature—SST, chlorophyll-a concentration, wind patterns, association with underwater predators). Two food shortages...
Published on Jan 1, 2012
Lynda E. Chambers19
Estimated H-index: 19
(BOM: Bureau of Meteorology),
Peter Dann2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
+ 2 AuthorsEric J. Woehler22
Estimated H-index: 22
Summary The East Australian Current (EAC) is a complex and highly energetic western boundary system in the south-western Pacific off eastern Australia. The EAC forms part of the western boundary of the South Pacific Gyre and the linking element between the Pacific and Indian Ocean gyres. The EAC is similar to other western boundary currents and is dominated by a series of mesoscale eddies which produce highly variable patterns of current strength and direction. Seasonal, interannual and particul...