Data needs for sustainable decision making

Published on Jun 1, 1999in International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology 2.37
· DOI :10.1080/13504509909469999
Andrew R. McLaren1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Manitoba),
Slobodan P. Simonovic39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Manitoba)
Abstract
SUMMARY This paper examines the issue of data requirements for sustainable decision making. Three sustainability criteria are examined and issues arising from their application and data requirements are discussed. Notes and experiences from two case studies involving the North Central Project and the Assiniboine Delta Aquifer, both in the Province of Manitoba, Canada are included. The major issue encountered through the case studies was the inclusion of qualitative data.
  • References (14)
  • Citations (11)
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References14
Published on Jan 1, 1995in AlterNative
Christina Chociolko1
Estimated H-index: 1
13 Citations
Slobodan P. Simonovic39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Manitoba),
Donald H. Burn42
Estimated H-index: 42
(University of Manitoba),
Barbara J. Lence12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of British Columbia)
SUMMARY The new paradigm of sustainability necessitates revisions to traditional decision-making processes. This paper, which is the first in a series of four, outlines the changes required for decision-making to reflect sustainability concerns. Three sustainability criteria, that are the focus of the three subsequent papers, are introduced and the rationale for each is explained. A framework for incorporating the three sustainability criteria into the decision-making process is briefly outlined...
15 Citations Source Cite
Nick Fanai1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Manitoba),
Donald H. Burn42
Estimated H-index: 42
(University of Manitoba)
SUMMARY Integration of sustainability issues into the project selection process requires new approaches to decision-making. A framework is proposed for measuring reversibility as one component for achieving this goal. Reversibility in the context of this research is defined as the degree to which the aggregated set of anticipated or unanticipated impacts of a development project can be mitigated. Several concepts found in the sustainable development literature are used in the framework. The effi...
9 Citations Source Cite
Heidelore I. Kroeger1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Manitoba),
Slobodan P. Simonovic39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Manitoba)
SUMMARY Sustainable decision-making requires consideration of technology, ecology, and the social and political infrastructure of society. While it may never be possible to identify with certainty what is sustainable and what is not, an attempt has been made in this paper to formulate a measure that permits one to compare the performances of project alternatives with respect to risk. An algorithm is presented for the evaluation of a risk criterion that can be used with other criteria in the proc...
7 Citations Source Cite
Sam Matheson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Manitoba),
Barbara J. Lence12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of British Columbia),
Josef Fürst7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad)
Abstract This work develops general fairness measures that may be used as criteria for sustainable project selection. Sustainable development, fair allocation objectives and empirical distance-based measures of fairness, and their evaluation are discussed. Generalized fairness measures are developed and extended for both intratemporal and intertemporal fairness comparisons. A preliminary application of the extended distance based fairness measures is then performed for a case study of the select...
9 Citations Source Cite
George F. McMAHON1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Janusz R. Mrozek4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
Abstract Neoclassical economics has only recently considered the problem of sustainability—how to provide for the well-being of future generations given ecological constraints. In general, the neoclassical economist perceives physical and ecological constraints on economy-environment interactions as inconveniences that will inevitably be overcome by substitution—the discovery of new economic resources or technologies allowing the conversion of noneconomic materials to economic goods. Ecologists ...
20 Citations Source Cite
B. W. Baetz1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
R. M. Korol1
Estimated H-index: 1
The concept of sustainable development has been widely discussed in a number of forums throughout the world. Recent developments, such as the creation of the World Engineering Partnership for Sustainable Development, will greatly aid in advancing the underlying concept beyond the conceptual stage through to the development of practical approaches that engineers can use to sustainably plan, design, and operate engineering projects. Engineering for sustainability will require us as professionals t...
16 Citations Source Cite
Barbara J. Lence12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of British Columbia),
Josef Fürst7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad),
Sam Matheson2
Estimated H-index: 2
SUMMARY In evaluating civil engineering projects and management alternatives, the distribution of project impacts among groups in the same generation (intratemporal impact distributions) and between groups in different generations (intertemporal impact distributions) may be used as indicators of project viability and potential sustainability. Empirical measures of distributive fairness among groups at one point in time have typically been applied in project selection. These measures are often ba...
7 Citations Source Cite
Michael J. Bender6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Manitoba),
Slobodan P. Simonovic39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Manitoba)
Abstract Sustainable development is the new water resources paradigm of the 1990s, Yet its practical implications seem to be elusive. Metrics for measuring the level of sustainability are eagerly sought. It is very difficult to capture the important features, and maintain many of the valued details, of environmental and social systems when complete or appropriate economic accounting is attempted. A much more transcendent and flexible metric may be consensus. Consensus as a sustainability metric ...
18 Citations Source Cite
  • References (14)
  • Citations (11)
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Cited By11
Published on Jan 1, 1999in Canadian Water Resources Journal 1.57
R. Andrew McLaren1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Slobodan P. Simonovic39
Estimated H-index: 39
In this study we examine the implementation and practicality of three sustainability criteria: reversibility, risk and equity in the context of groundwater use and allocation in the Assiniboine Delta Aquifer (ADA) region. The objectives of the study were to design a strategy for implementing the three sustainability criteria, to test the feasibility of the criteria, to recommend improvements to the criteria and to provide insight into the sustainability of groundwater use in the ADA region. The ...
3 Citations Source Cite
Zbigniew W. Kundzewim1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research)
SUMMARY The notion of sustainable development in the context of water resources is discussed. Facing the increasing pressures — population growth with consequences for settlements and production of food and fibre, and human aspirations to better living standards — the business-as-usual approach to water development and management cannot he globally sustainable. The need for curbing water demands and for ‘doing more with less’ are gaining growing recognition in our increasingly thirsty planet. An...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2005in Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering 0.87
Halla R. Sahely3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Christopher Kennedy12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Barry J. Adams1
Estimated H-index: 1
Research in the area of sustainable urban infrastructure reflects the need to design and manage engineering systems in light of both environmental and socioeconomic considerations. A principal challenge for the engineer is the development of practical tools for measuring and enhancing the sustainability of urban infrastructure over its life cycle. The present study develops such a framework for the sustainability assessment of urban infrastructure systems. The framework focuses on key interactio...
172 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2014in Journal of Infrastructure Systems 1.36
Aman Bolar3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Solomon Tesfamariam21
Estimated H-index: 21
,
Rehan Sadiq40
Estimated H-index: 40
Infrastructure owners or management agencies have well established quality control programs with the intent of achieving safe and effective maintenance. However, consumers are becoming more involved in economic, environmental, and social issues related to infrastructure. Therefore, a valid quality program would be more definitive by involving voice of the customer in the maintenance decision-process. In this paper, an innovative approach for achieving quality and customer satisfaction in infrast...
11 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Social Science Journal 1.00
Zheng Zang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Nanjing University),
Xinqing Zou11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Nanjing University)
+ 2 AuthorsTeng Wang (Nanjing University)
Abstract To overcome the inherent shortcomings of the human development index (HDI) and to improve the comparability of evaluation results, in this study, an evaluation indicator system of regional sustainable development pressures was constructed based on catastrophe theory. An improved catastrophe model was used to calculate the sustainable development pressure index (SPI), which was combined with the human development index (HDI) proposed by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) to ex...
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