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Measures of Adiposity and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

Published on Mar 1, 2007in Obesity3.97
· DOI :10.1038/oby.2007.593
Andy Menke9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Tulane University),
Paul Muntner40
Estimated H-index: 40
(Tulane University)
+ 2 AuthorsJiang He99
Estimated H-index: 99
(Tulane University)
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Abstract
Objective: To determine which of five measures of adiposity maintains the strongest association with cardiovascular disease risk factors. Research Methods and Procedures: A nationally representative sample of 12,608 adult participants of the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were examined. Waist circumference, total body fat, percent body fat, BMI, and skinfold thickness were measured following a standardized protocol. Results: In multivariable adjusted models including waist circumference and BMI as independent variables, waist circumference was a significantly better predictor. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for each standard deviation higher waist circumference and BMI for men were as follows: 1.88 (1.43, 2.48) and 0.99 (0.76, 1.29), respectively, for hypertension; 1.51 (0.87, 2.59) and 1.23 (0.76, 1.99), respectively, for diabetes; and 1.85 (1.48, 2.32) and 1.00 (0.80, 1.24), respectively, for low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. The analogous odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for women were as follows: 2.28 (1.74, 3.00) and 0.91 (0.69, 1.19), respectively, for hypertension; 2.72 (1.85, 4.00) and 0.82 (0.55, 1.23), respectively, for diabetes; and 1.90 (1.47, 2.47) and 1.07 (0.83, 1.38), respectively, for low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Results were markedly similar for waist circumference in models adjusting for total body fat, percent body fat, and skinfold thickness separately. In contrast, waist circumference was not a significantly better predictor of elevated C-reactive protein than the other measures of adiposity. Discussion: Waist circumference maintains a stronger association with cardiovascular disease risk factors than other measures of adiposity.
  • References (33)
  • Citations (91)
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References33
Newest
Published on Feb 15, 2006in American Journal of Epidemiology4.47
Meghan Warren15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
Pamela J. Schreiner58
Estimated H-index: 58
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
James G. Terry26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Wake Forest University)
Intraabdominal fat (IAF) area is often measured indirectly in epidemiologic studies. The authors recruited 147 participants from the second examination (1990–1992) of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study to examine IAF area and determine whether there were differences in IAF area and distribution by location. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to image four 10-mm slices between the second and fourth lumbar vertebrae by an inverse recovery method, and IAF was calculated from each image....
Published on Nov 1, 2005in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism5.61
Caroline S. Fox124
Estimated H-index: 124
(Brigham and Women's Hospital),
Qiong Yang52
Estimated H-index: 52
(BU: Boston University)
+ 7 AuthorsAmanda M. Shearman17
Estimated H-index: 17
(MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Background: Polymorphisms in estrogen receptor-α (ESR1) may be associated with variation in body mass index and waist circumference. However, most prior studies have been limited by sample size and power. Methods: DNA from 1763 unrelated men and women (mean age, 56 yr) from the Framingham Heart Study offspring cohort was genotyped for four ESR1 polymorphisms: T30C (rs2077647) in exon 1, PvuII (rs2234693), and XbaI (rs 9340799) in intron 1, and C1335G (rs 1801132) in exon 4. Results: Men homozygo...
Published on Jan 1, 2005in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition6.57
Guang Sun20
Estimated H-index: 20
(MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland),
Curtis R. French13
Estimated H-index: 13
(MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)
+ 8 AuthorsWayne Gulliver23
Estimated H-index: 23
(MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)
Background: Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is widely usedinclinicsandresearchtomeasurebodycomposition.However, the results of BIA validation with reference methods are contradictory, and few data are available on the influence of adiposity on the measurement of body composition by BIA. Objective:The goal was to determine the effects of sex and adiposityonthedifferenceinpercentagebodyfat(%BF)predictedbyBIA compared with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Design:Atotalof591healthysubj...
Published on Dec 1, 2004in Clinical Nutrition6.40
Ursula G. Kyle40
Estimated H-index: 40
(Geneva College),
Ingvar Bosaeus45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Sahlgrenska University Hospital)
+ 10 AuthorsMatthias Pirlich36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Charité)
BIA is easy, non-invasive, relatively inexpensive and can be performed in almost any subject because it is portable. Part II of these ESPEN guidelines reports results for fat-free mass (FFM), body fat (BF), body cell mass (BCM), total body water (TBW), extracellular water (ECW) and intracellular water (ICW) from various studies in healthy and ill subjects. The data suggests that BIA works well in healthy subjects and in patients with stable water and electrolytes balance with a validated BIA equ...
Published on Oct 1, 2004in Clinical Nutrition6.40
Ursula G. Kyle40
Estimated H-index: 40
(Geneva College),
Ingvar Bosaeus45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Sahlgrenska University Hospital)
+ 10 AuthorsMatthias Pirlich36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Charité)
Abstract The use of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is widespread both in healthy subjects and patients, but suffers from a lack of standardized method and quality control procedures. BIA allows the determination of the fat-free mass (FFM) and total body water (TBW) in subjects without significant fluid and electrolyte abnormalities, when using appropriate population, age or pathology-specific BIA equations and established procedures. Published BIA equations validated against a reference ...
Published on Sep 1, 2004in Medical Clinics of North America2.72
Satish Kenchaiah18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
John Michael Gaziano113
Estimated H-index: 113
(Harvard University)
Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the United States and worldwide. Heart failure (HF) is also a major public health problem, which, despite therapeutic advances, is associated with substantial mortality. The adverse impact of obesity on the cardiovascular system is being increasingly recognized, and includes a hyperdynamic circulation, subclinical cardiac structural and functional changes, and overt HF. At the same time, the possible protective effect of obesity in patients with establ...
Published on Sep 1, 2004in Diabetes Care15.27
Ralph B. D'Agostino189
Estimated H-index: 189
,
Richard F. Hamman80
Estimated H-index: 80
+ 3 AuthorsSteven M. Haffner115
Estimated H-index: 115
OBJECTIVE —In a few previous studies, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (RFs) have been shown to predict diabetes. Our objective was to determine whether the presence of CVD RFs predict the eventual development of diabetes after controlling for known RFs, such as directly measured insulin resistance and obesity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS —We studied 872 participants with normal or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who were enrolled at baseline in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis S...
Published on Mar 1, 2004in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition6.57
JanssenIan65
Estimated H-index: 65
(Queen's University),
Peter T. Katzmarzyk81
Estimated H-index: 81
(Queen's University),
Robert Ross47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Queen's University)
Background: The addition of waist circumference (WC) to body mass index (BMI; in kg/m 2 ) predicts a greater variance in health risk than does BMI alone; however, whether the reverse is true is not known. Objective: We evaluated whether BMI adds to the predictive power of WC in assessing obesity-related comorbidity. Design: Subjects were 14 924 adult participants in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, grouped into categories of BMI and WC in accordance with the National I...
Published on Jan 1, 2004in American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs2.58
Dick C. Chan37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UWA: University of Western Australia),
Hugh Barrett6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UWA: University of Western Australia),
Watts G.F.80
Estimated H-index: 80
(UWA: University of Western Australia)
Visceral obesity is frequently associated with high plasma triglycerides and low plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and with high plasma concentrations of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins. Atherogenic dyslipidemia in these patients may be caused by a combination of overproduction of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) apoB-100, decreased catabolism of apoB-containing particles, and increased catabolism of HDL-apoA-I particles. These abnormalities may be consequen...
Published on Feb 1, 2003in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition6.57
Shumei S. Sun22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
W. Cameron Chumlea24
Estimated H-index: 24
+ 7 AuthorsVan S. Hubbard42
Estimated H-index: 42
Background: Previous studies to develop and validate bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) equations to predict body composition were limited by small sample sizes, sex specificity, and reliance on reference methods that use a 2-component model. Objective: This study was designed to develop sex-specific BIA equations to predict total body water (TBW) and fat-free mass (FFM) with the use of a multicomponent model for children and adults. Design: Data from 5 centers were pooled to create a sample...
Cited By91
Newest
Published on Feb 21, 2019in European Journal of Preventive Cardiology5.64
Oyuntugs Byambasukh (Mongolian National University), Michele F. Eisenga5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UG: University of Groningen)
+ 2 AuthorsE va Corpeleijn28
Estimated H-index: 28
(UG: University of Groningen)
AimsTo investigate prospectively the association of body fat percentage (BF%) estimates using various equations from bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) with cardiovascular events, compared with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference.Methods and resultsWe used data of 34 BIA-BF%-equations that were used for estimation of BF% in 6486 (men = 3194, women = 3294) subjects. During a median follow-up of 8.3 years, 510 (7.9%) cardiovascular events (363 in men; 147 in women) occurred. In men, ...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Environment International7.94
Xin Wang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UM: University of Michigan),
Bhramar Mukherjee29
Estimated H-index: 29
(UM: University of Michigan),
Sung Kyun Park26
Estimated H-index: 26
(UM: University of Michigan)
Abstract Background Some heavy metals (e.g., arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury) have been associated with obesity and obesity comorbidities. The analytical approach for those associations has typically focused on individual metals. There is a growing interest in evaluating the health effects of cumulative exposure to metal mixtures. Objectives We utilized our Environmental Risk Score (ERS), a summary measure to examine the risk of exposure to multi-pollutants in epidemiologic research, to evaluate...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nutrition Journal3.59
Ahmad Syauqy1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNDIP: Diponegoro University),
Chien-Yeh Hsu14
Estimated H-index: 14
(TMU: Taipei Medical University)
+ 1 AuthorsJane C J Chao6
Estimated H-index: 6
(TMU: Taipei Medical University)
Background Metabolic syndrome is commonly associated with inflammation. The underlying factors of inflammation in metabolic syndrome are not fully understood. The objective of the study was to determine the association of dietary patterns, anthropometric measurements, and metabolic parameters with inflammatory markers in middle-aged and older adults with metabolic syndrome in Taiwan.
Published on Dec 1, 2017in BMC Obesity
Kevin Y. Taing1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U of T: University of Toronto),
Michael E. Farkouh48
Estimated H-index: 48
(U of T: University of Toronto)
+ 2 AuthorsPrabhat Jha50
Estimated H-index: 50
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Background The utility of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) derived adiposity measures as compared to anthropometric measures for the assessment of adiposity-related health risk is not clear. We aimed to clarify the relationships of BIA and anthropometric derived adipose measures with blood pressure and hypertension, and to compare the discriminative ability of the respective measures for hypertension.
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders1.60
Jorge Enrique Correa Bautista11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Del Rosario University),
Katherine González-Ruíz9
Estimated H-index: 9
+ 9 AuthorsEmilio Villa-González8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UGR: University of Granada)
Abstract Purpose: Obesity and high body fat are related to diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in all ethnic groups. Based on the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definition of MetS, the aim of the present study was to compare body adiposity indexes (BAIs) and to assess their various cutoff values for the prediction of MetS in university students from Colombia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 886 volunteers (51.9% woman; age mean 21.4 years). Anthropometric characteri...
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Journal of Endocrinological Investigation
L. Qing1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CQMU: Chongqing Medical University),
Ren Wei2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CQMU: Chongqing Medical University)
+ 2 AuthorsX. Xin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CQMU: Chongqing Medical University)
Aim Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) refers to decreased secretion of growth hormones in the adults, which is associated with increased clustering of conventional cardiovascular risk factors such as central obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a recognized risk factor of cardiovascluar diseases, shares some clinical features. Given that the prevalence of MetS is on the rise in patients with AGHD, and that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important caus...
Published on May 1, 2017in Nutrition Research2.63
Farzaneh Rezagholizadeh4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Tehran University of Medical Sciences),
Kurosh Djafarian12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Tehran University of Medical Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsSakineh Shab-Bidar14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Tehran University of Medical Sciences)
Abstract Central obesity is a pivotal component of metabolic syndrome, and several studies have investigated the association of dietary patterns and central obesity. However, findings of studies are inconclusive. Therefore, we aimed to conduct the present study to summarize the available data regarding the association of a posteriori dietary patterns and central obesity in adults to test the hypothesis of whether a highly healthy dietary pattern is associated with decreased risk of central obesi...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism3.05
Carolina Cunha de Oliveira6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Anna Karla Carneiro Roriz6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 1 AuthorsMansueto Gomes Neto10
Estimated H-index: 10
Background: Adiposity indicators can be used as predictors of cardiovascular risk in the elderly. However, there are only a very few studies that deal with the ac
Published on Nov 1, 2016in American Journal of Preventive Medicine4.43
Urshila Sriram4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Cornell University),
Andrea Z. LaCroix96
Estimated H-index: 96
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego)
+ 9 AuthorsMarcia L. Stefanick82
Estimated H-index: 82
(Stanford University)
Introduction Neighborhood environments may play a role in the rising prevalence of obesity among older adults. However, research on built environmental correlates of obesity in this age group is limited. The current study aimed to explore associations of Walk Score, a validated measure of neighborhood walkability, with BMI and waist circumference in a large, diverse sample of older women. Methods This study linked cross-sectional data on 6,526 older postmenopausal women from the Women's Health I...