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The stability of the feedback negativity and its relationship with depression during childhood and adolescence.

Published on Nov 1, 2015in Development and Psychopathology3.593
· DOI :10.1017/S0954579414001400
Jennifer N. Bress10
Estimated H-index: 10
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Alexandria Meyer14
Estimated H-index: 14
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Greg Hajcak Proudfit23
Estimated H-index: 23
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Sources
Abstract
Feedback negativity (FN) is an event-related potential elicited by monetary reward and loss; it is thought to relate to reward-related neural activity and has been linked to depression in children and adults. In the current study, we examined the stability of FN, and its relationship with depression in adolescents, over 2 years in 45 8- to 13-year-old children. From Time 1 to Time 2, FN in response to monetary loss and in response to monetary gain showed moderate to strong reliability ( r s = .64 and .67, respectively); these relationships remained significant even when accounting for related variables. FN also demonstrated high within-session reliability. Moreover, the relationship between a blunted FN and greater depression observed at Time 1 was reproduced at Time 2, and the magnitude of FN at Time 1 predicted depressive symptomatology at Time 2. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that FN and its relationship with depression remain consistent over the course of development, and that FN may prospectively predict later depressive symptomatology. The current results suggest that FN may be suitable as a biomarker of depressive symptoms during adolescence.
  • References (56)
  • Citations (37)
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References56
Newest
#1Jennifer N. Bress (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 10
#2Alexandria Meyer (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 14
Last. Greg Hajcak (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 66
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The current study, which was a reanalysis of previous data, focused on the error-related negativity (ERN)—an event-related potential (ERP) associated with error monitoring—and the feedback negativity (FN)—an ERP associated with reward processing. Two objectives motivated this study: first, to illustrate the relationship between the ERN and anxious symptoms, and the relationship between the FN and depressive symptoms; second, to explore whether the ERN and the FN relate uniquely to anxiety and de...
66 CitationsSource
#1Anna Weinberg (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 1
#2Noah C. Venables (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 16
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Affect-modulated event-related potentials (ERPs) are increasingly used to study psychopathology and individual differences in emotion processing. Many have suggested that variation in these neural responses reflects genetically mediated risk. However, to date, no studies have demonstrated genetic contributions to affect-modulated ERPs. The present study therefore sought to examine the heritability of a range of ERPs elicited during affective picture viewing. One hundred and thirty monozygotic an...
24 CitationsSource
#1Dan Foti (Purdue University)H-Index: 28
#2Joshua M. Carlson (NMU: Northern Michigan University)H-Index: 19
Last. Greg Hajcak Proudfit (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 23
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Abstract Reward dysfunction is thought to play a core role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Event-related potential (ERP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified reward processing deficits in MDD, but these methods have yet to be applied together in a single MDD sample. We utilized multimodal neuroimaging evidence to examine reward dysfunction in MDD. Further, we explored how neurobiological reward dysfunction would map onto subtypes of ...
75 CitationsSource
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#2Somayyeh Montazer-Hojat (UVic: University of Victoria)H-Index: 1
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Abstract Children and adolescents learn to regulate their behavior by utilizing feedback from the environment but exactly how this ability develops remains unclear. To investigate this question, we recorded the event-related brain potential (ERP) from children (8–13 years), adolescents (14–17 years) and young adults (18–23 years) while they navigated a “virtual maze” in pursuit of monetary rewards. The amplitude of the reward positivity, an ERP component elicited by feedback stimuli, was evaluat...
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#1Alexandria Meyer (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 14
#2Jennifer N. Bress (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 10
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Error processing is frequently examined using the error-related negativity (ERN), a negative-going event-related potential occurring after the commission of an error at frontal-central sites, and has been suggested as a neural biomarker that may be useful in characterizing trajectories of risk for anxiety. While the ERN has been shown to have excellent psychometric properties in adults, few studies have examined psychometric properties of the ERN in children and adolescents. The current study ex...
41 CitationsSource
#1Autumn KujawaH-Index: 21
Last. Daniel N. KleinH-Index: 73
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Abstract Depression appears to be characterized by reduced neural reactivity to receipt of reward. Despite evidence of shared etiologies and high rates of comorbidity between depression and anxiety, this abnormality may be relatively specific to depression. However, it is unclear whether children at risk for depression also exhibit abnormal reward responding, and if so, whether risk for anxiety moderates this association. The feedback negativity (FN) is an event-related potential component sensi...
72 CitationsSource
#1Michael P.I. Becker (Schiller International University)H-Index: 10
#2Alexander M. Nitsch (Schiller International University)H-Index: 5
Last. Thomas Straube (Schiller International University)H-Index: 32
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An event-related potential (ERP) component reliably associated with feedback processing and well studied in humans is the feedback-related negativity (FRN), which is assumed to indicate activation of midcingulate cortex (MCC) neurons. However, recent approaches have conceptualized this frontocentral ERP component as reflecting at least partially a reward positivity associated with activation in reward-related brain regions, in line with fMRI studies investigating feedback processing in the conte...
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#2Ling-zhi WangH-Index: 7
Last. Raymond C.K. Chan (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 50
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Anhedonia is associated with reward-processing deficits of the dopamine system, which may increase the risk of depression. Nevertheless, few previous studies have examined the influence of hedonic tone on event-related potential (ERP) measures of reward processing in major depressive disorder. A simple gambling task was used to elicit feedback negativity (FN), an ERP component elicited by feedback indicating gain versus loss, in 27 patients with major depression and 27 healthy participants. We f...
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We employed event-related potentials to examine the feedback-related negativity (FRN), during a non-learning reward versus non-reward task. We compared 10–12-year-old, 13–14-year-old, and 15–17-year-old youth (n = 91). Age effects included a larger FRN for younger age groups, regardless of feedback type, and a decrease in peak latency for feedback, across age groups as a linear trend. Males showed larger responses irrespective of feedback type and longer latency for rewarded feedback. Source mod...
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#1Jennifer N. Bress (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 10
#2Greg Hajcak (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 66
Rewards are integral to learning associations that aid in survival. The feedback negativity (FN), an event-related potential that differentiates outcomes indicating monetary losses versus gains, has recently emerged as a possible neural measure of reward processing. If this view is correct, then the FN should correlate with measures of reward sensitivity in other domains, although few studies have investigated this question. In the current study, 46 participants completed a self-report measure o...
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