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The development of source use by international postgraduate students

Published on Jun 1, 2013in Journal of English for Academic Purposes1.73
· DOI :10.1016/j.jeap.2012.11.008
Mary Davis3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Oxford Brookes University)
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Abstract
Abstract It is widely accepted that learning to use sources is difficult, especially for international postgraduate students, but to date, few longitudinal studies have been carried out in this area. Therefore, this two-year UK-based study aims to help fill this gap by examining the source use of three Chinese postgraduate students of business, technology and public relations. Data was gathered over four iterations through a Pre-Master's EAP programme and subsequent Master's degree, in order to investigate the development of source use on both EAP and Master's programmes. Four features of source use in the assignments – citation, paraphrasing, reporting verbs and attribution – were analysed over the period. Analysis of the results shows that participants started at different points, progressed differently, and did not all reach a competent level. Participants also developed some individual strategies in their source use, such as relying on a small range of features, over-citation and copying sections of attributed text, especially internet sources. The findings offer an insight into student practices and suggest the need for greater and more continuous pedagogical support to enable students to achieve competence in source use.
  • References (40)
  • Citations (32)
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References40
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Published on Jun 1, 2012in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
Bojana Petrić8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Essex)
Using textual analysis and interviews with student writers, this study aims to provide an insight into second language students’ use of direct quotations in their MA theses by comparing direct quotations in high-rated and low-rated Master's theses, and by exploring student writers’ own motivations to quote directly from sources. The corpus consists of eight high-rated and eight low-rated Master's theses written in English in the field of gender studies by students from Central and Eastern Europe...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Written Communication1.22
Nigel Harwood15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Bojana Petrić8
Estimated H-index: 8
This article reports the results of an interview-based study which investigated the citation behavior in the assignment writing of two second-language postgraduate business management students, Sofie and Tara. Discourse-based interviews were used to elicit the students’ own perspectives on their citation behavior in two of their assignments. Citations were one of the ways in which Sofie and Tara enacted performance (Goffman, 1959), aiming to create a favorable impression on the assignment marker...
Published on Dec 1, 2010in Journal of English for Academic Purposes1.73
Paul Stapleton15
Estimated H-index: 15
(EUHK: Hong Kong Institute of Education)
Abstract Studies on second language (L2) learners writing in English have found that composing is a recursive process requiring planning, formulating and revising. Of particular note among the many studies that have explored the composing processes of L2 writers are two characteristics: 1) They examine the composing processes of writers in real-time while they respond to a prompt. 2) They have been performed on writers who compose using pen and paper. While such research has been valuable for ad...
Published on Feb 1, 2010in Applied Linguistics3.04
Ling Shi17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
This article explores the citing behaviors of 16 undergraduates in a North American university. After completing a research paper for their disciplinary courses, each participating student was interviewed to identify in his/her writing words and ideas borrowed from source texts and to explain why and how the relevant texts were appropriated with or without citations. Analysis of students’ writing and comments illustrates how they relied on source texts for various aspects of their essays, some o...
Published on Jan 1, 2010in Functions of Language0.43
Sook Hee Lee2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CSU: Charles Sturt University)
This paper explores cross-cultural and grade-based differences in the use of intertextual resources in persuasive essays written by tertiary students. Expressions of explicit intertextuality are analysed using the model of Attribution, an element of the engagement system formulated within the interpersonal metafunction of Systemic Functional Linguistics. The text analysis, supported by interview results, reveals that while there are some differences in the overall use of Attribution between nati...
Graham Hall6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Terry Wai-Ching Sung1
Estimated H-index: 1
This paper reports on a project which explored the experiences of a group of East Asian students studying postgraduate business programmes at a British university. Data drawn from a series of in-depth interviews with the students and their lecturers provided clear evidence that many of the students faced a substantial number of difficulties which affected their learning. The data also show that the lecturers and students had differing perceptions about why such difficulties arose. Whilst lecture...
Published on Mar 1, 2009
Susan D. Blum6
Estimated H-index: 6
Published on Mar 1, 2009in Journal of Pragmatics1.33
Nigel Harwood15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Essex)
This paper is an emic, interview-based study of computer scientists’ and sociologists’ accounts of the functions of citations in their writing. Twelve informants took part in the research, commenting upon their citations in one of their own articles. Informants were not provided with functional checklists, and were free to ascribe as many functions to each citation as they wished. Eleven citation functions are identified and described, and evidence of inter- and intra-disciplinary similarities a...
Published on Jan 1, 2009
Julie Price1
Estimated H-index: 1
This research focuses on the punishment and sanctions awarded to student cases of plagiarism within a Higher Education (HE) setting. More specifically, this research investigated two key aspects: the extent and nature of consensus amongst those who work and study within HE; and whether penalties could be applied consistently. Consensus and consistency should be evident in any punishment system if it is going to be viewed as fair by the community who use it, and by those who receive a penalty as ...
Published on Jan 1, 2009
Lawrence A. Machi1
Estimated H-index: 1
Cited By32
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Published on Jul 1, 2019in Assessing Writing1.84
Maryam Homayounzadeh (Shiraz University), Mahboobeh Saadat1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Shiraz University),
Alireza Ahmadi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Shiraz University)
Abstract The study presents an attempt to explore the impact of source characteristics on task comparability in integrated writing tasks. To this end, two read-listen-write tasks of TOEFL iBT were selected to differ in topic, structural organization, and lexical and conceptual overlap, suggested to be significant in affecting summary quality ( Cho, Rijmen, & Novak, 2013 ; Li, 2014 ; Yu, 2009 ). The performance of a group of TOEFL candidates on the two tasks was qualitatively analyzed and quantit...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
Cassi L. Liardét3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Macquarie University),
Sharyn Black (UNSW: University of New South Wales)
Abstract A key feature of academic texts is the heteroglossic interaction that occurs between the writer and the experts he/she references. When integrating outside experts into their texts, writers often employ integral, author prominent reporting structures, selecting reporting verbs (RVs) to evaluate the veracity and merit of the propositions. This paper examines EAL and English L1 learners’ RV use and compares it with that of experts, providing a corpus-assisted, comparative analysis. It fur...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
Debra A. Friedman5
Estimated H-index: 5
(IU: Indiana University)
Abstract Using the theoretical framework of language socialization, this paper investigates the local contexts in which four international students were initiated into citation during their first semester in a Masters in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (MA-TESOL) program. Drawing from 38 hours of observation and audiotaping in two teaching methods courses, interviews with instructors and students, and students’ texts, it situates students’ citation practices within the discourses...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Journal of English for Academic Purposes1.73
Heike Neumann5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Concordia University),
Sarah Leu (McGill University), Kim McDonough10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Concordia University)
Abstract Researchers have called for the development of new pedagogical strategies to help students learn how to integrate source information into their own texts effectively (Casanave, 2017; Hu, 2015). Since these strategies are tied to particular pedagogical contexts, their development has to be preceded by a careful examination of the context where they will be implemented. To that end, the current study examined how students use sources in their own writing at an English-medium university in...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in English for Specific Purposes1.70
Quynh Nguyen (University of Auckland), Louisa Buckingham4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Auckland)
Abstract This is a qualitative investigation into international Master's students' approach to using sources in read-to-write assignments. It investigates three stages of students' engagement with sources: understanding source-use expectations, identifying appropriate sources, and incorporating content from source texts into assignment writing. Data were compiled from text-based interviews with seven Vietnamese students, an assignment, and course-related documentation. The results provide insigh...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Journal of English for Academic Purposes1.73
Jian-E Peng5
Estimated H-index: 5
(STU: Shantou University)
Abstract Constructing authorial voice is considered essential in English academic texts. Citation as an important discursive feature contributing to authorial voice has been underexplored, despite fruitful research on citation practices. It also remains largely unknown whether variations in citation-based voice construction exist in doctoral theses completed across training contexts. This study explores and compares authorial voice constructed in citation in the literature review chapters of 20 ...
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Journal of English for Academic Purposes1.73
Alireza Jalilifar9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz),
Parvin Soltani (Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz), Zohreh G. Shooshtari2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz)
Abstract The current study investigated inappropriate textual borrowings, in Iranian English scholarly journals of applied linguistics. They were examined in terms of their frequency and patterns as well as the way they function in rhetorical organization of the texts. The originality check was performed on the Introduction sections of 115 journal articles, using the text matching software (iThenticate) along with human inspection to exclude irrelevant or coincidental matches. The findings indic...