Match!

Separation from the mother and the development of play in cats

Published on Feb 1, 1981in Animal Behaviour2.67
· DOI :10.1016/S0003-3472(81)80163-7
Patrick Bateson47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Cambridge),
Michelle Young3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Cambridge)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract In seven litters of domestic cats, half of each litter of four were gradually separated from the rest of the family 31–39 days after birth. The separated kittens showed significantly higher frequencies of play on some measures. In part this was because they were more active, but when the play data were corrected for general activity differences, the separated kittens were still found to have played more. The influence of separation from the mother on play may be a facultative response by the kittens to early weaning which, in natural conditions, would probably be associated with reduced opportunities for play at later stages in development.
  • References (8)
  • Citations (88)
Cite
References8
Newest
Published on Apr 26, 2010in Ethology1.52
Joel Berger43
Estimated H-index: 43
Field data on weaning behavior in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) were collected from populations in British Columbia, southern California, and one transplanted from the original B.C. study site to eastern Oregon. These areas were designated mountain, desert, and transplant, respectively. Seasons that were energetically stressful to lactating ewes were predicted. Summers were implicated for desert ewes; winters for ewes in colder and more seasonal northern environments. Although the temporal dis...
Published on Jan 1, 1981in Behaviour1.40
T.M. Caro2
Estimated H-index: 2
(St And: University of St Andrews)
This study relates changes in social play of kittens to the development of predatory behaviour. Firstly, it documents the development of predatory motor patterns in young cats between the age of 4 and 12 weeks. Correlations between measures of predatory behaviour were found to break down in the 8 to 12 week period of development. Secondly, it examines the development of social play over the same time course. Correlations between some measures of play were also found to break down between 8 and 1...
Published on Jan 1, 1981
P. J. B. Slater1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Sussex)
This article explores reasons for individual differences in animal behavior and points to various ways in which they deserve closer study. Differences in feeding, mating, or fighting behavior may occur because selection favors the adoption of different strategies by different individuals. Variations in signals may arise through selection for animals to be identifiable as individuals or for their relatedness to others to be assessed. The variability of behavior itself varies between different pat...
Published on Nov 1, 1979in Behavioral and Neural Biology
Patrick Bateson47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Cambridge),
Michelle Young3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Cambridge)
In a study of domestic cats a sharp increase in playful contacts with objects occurred in most animals at around 50 days after birth. However, this change was not observed in litters that contained only females. Possibly the males by playing a lot had a short-term activating effect on their sisters. In order to examine whether males stimulated their female siblings in this way, the object play of male and female kittens was measured from 42 to 70 days after birth in the presence and absence of t...
Published on Jan 1, 1979in Behaviour1.40
T. M. Caro1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
R. Roper1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsG. R. Dank1
Estimated H-index: 1
This paper examines the methods used in expressing agreement between observers both when individual occurrences and total frequencies of behaviour are considered. It discusses correlational methods of deriving inter-observer reliability and then examines the relations between these three methods. Some of the factors that affect reliability are reported. These include problems of definition such as how a behaviour may change with age and how reliability depends on which recipient of behaviour is ...
Published on Jan 1, 1978in Behaviour1.40
Patrick Bateson47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Cambridge),
Priscilla Barrett1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Cambridge)
The behaviour of 28 domestic cats from the 4th to the 12th weeks after birth was studied in the presence and absence of their mother. We obtained measures of distress, activity, timidity, distance between mother and kitten, and seven facets of play. The developmental trends in the various measures of play were different, some categories declining in frequency from the 4-7 week period to the 8-12 week period and others notably Object Contact, increasing markedly. These opposing trends and a marke...
Published on Jan 1, 1975in BioScience6.59
Colin Beer12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Patrick Bateson6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Peter H. Klopfer21
Estimated H-index: 21
V. E. Hall8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Stanford University),
G. N. Pierce1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Stanford University)
Cited By88
Newest
Published on May 1, 2019in Applied Animal Behaviour Science1.82
Mikel M. Delgado5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Mikel Delgado (UC Davis: University of California, Davis), Julie Hecht (Hunter College)
Abstract Although attention to domestic cat ( Felis silvestris catus ) behavior and cognition has increased in recent years, numerous questions remain regarding their play. Few studies have included play as a variable of interest, and to the best of our knowledge no behavioral studies focusing on cat play have been published in the last 15 years, and there is no recent review of our current understanding of its development, behavioral components, function, or outstanding research questions. This...
Published on Apr 3, 2019in Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science1.19
John J. McGlone41
Estimated H-index: 41
(TTU: Texas Tech University),
Arlene Garcia3
Estimated H-index: 3
(TTU: Texas Tech University)
+ 1 AuthorsGlenna Pirner2
Estimated H-index: 2
(TTU: Texas Tech University)
ABSTRACTIntroducing a new cat into a household with one or more resident cats can be a significant source of stress for the cats involved. These studies sought to determine if rabbit maternal-neonatal pheromone (2-methyl-2-butenal [2M2B]) in litter impacted cat social behaviors and litter box use. Study 1 determined that cats preferred to eliminate in litter containing 2M2B; other semiochemicals tested did not change litter box use. Cats prone to aggression were identified in an intermediate pil...
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Animal Behaviour2.67
Simona Cafazzo9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna),
Sarah Marshall-Pescini9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna)
+ 3 AuthorsFriederike Range30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna)
Puppy packs (consisting of only puppies) and mixed-age packs (composed of puppies and adults) were observed to test whether social play can be used for assessing and establishing social relations in wolves, Canis lupus . Differently from previous studies, we looked at play behaviours in detail, allowing us to categorize play interactions as either competitive or relaxed, and predicted that different types of play would be associated with different relationships between individuals. We found that...
Published on Mar 1, 2018in Nature Neuroscience21.13
Dayu Lin15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Center for Neural Science)
Using a series of functional manipulation and in vivo recording tools, Park et al. identify a pathway from medial preoptic CaMKIIα-expressing neurons to the ventral periaqueductal gray that mediates object craving and prey hunting.
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Behavioural Processes2.01
Jamie Ahloy-Dallaire2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Stanford University),
Julia Espinosa2
Estimated H-index: 2
(U of T: University of Toronto),
Georgia Mason35
Estimated H-index: 35
(U of G: University of Guelph)
Abstract Play is commonly used to assess affective states in both humans and non-human animals. Play appears to be most common when animals are well-fed and not under any direct threats to fitness. Could play and playfulness therefore indicate pre-existing positive emotions, and thence optimal animal welfare? We examine this question by surveying the internal and external conditions that promote or suppress play in a variety of species, starting with humans. We find that negative affective state...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Developmental Psychobiology1.85
Becca Franks11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UBC: University of British Columbia),
Frances A. Champagne51
Estimated H-index: 51
(Columbia University),
James P. Curley30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Columbia University)
Maternal care experienced during postnatal development predicts long-term neurobiological and behavioral outcomes. However, the cascade of behavioral changes that emerge in response to maternal care has not been elucidated. In the current study, we examine naturally occurring variation in postnatal licking/grooming (LG) in C57BL/6J mice to determine its impact on preweaning maternal and pup behavior, the weaning process, the pace of developmental change, the emergence of social behavior, and ind...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Applied Animal Behaviour Science1.82
Carole Fureix11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Rebecca K. Meagher12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
Captive/domestic animals are often described as inactive, with the implicit or explicit implication that this high level of inactivity is a welfare problem. Conversely, not being inactive enough may also indicate or cause poor welfare. In humans, too much inactivity can certainly be associated with either negative or positive affective states. In non-human animals, however, the affective states associated with elevated or suppressed levels of inactivity are still not well understood. Part of the...
Published on May 1, 2015in Animal Behavior and Cognition
Catherine Blois-Heulin16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Rennes),
Céline Rochais6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Rennes)
+ 5 AuthorsMartine Hausberger33
Estimated H-index: 33
(University of Rennes)
There is no consensus regarding the functions of play. As play behavior is a characteristic of young stages of development, it has been suggested that the higher prevalence of adult play observed in domestic animals could be the result of their "neotenic retardation." Functional hypotheses have dealt with the long term benefits, such as "rehearsal," "motor training" for future adult competencies or "training for the unexpected." However, there is little consistent experimental evidence favoring ...
Published on Jan 1, 2015
Funding Agencies: Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Alberta Innovates-Health Solutions
Rafał Stryjek10
Estimated H-index: 10
Play fighting in rats involves attack and defense of the nape. To protect the nape, rats use a variety of defensive tactics, with different strains having specific preferences. Targeting of the nape is established before weaning and defense matures over the course of the week preceding and the week proceeding weaning. Thus, it is possible that experience from engaging in immature forms of play is needed to consolidate the nape as the playful target and for the development of the juvenile-typical...
View next paperThe development of play in cats.