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Embedding academic writing instruction into subject teaching:A case study

Published on Mar 1, 2011in Active Learning in Higher Education2.29
· DOI :10.1177/1469787410387814
Ursula Wingate11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Nicholas Andon5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Alessia Cogo9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Surrey)
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Abstract
The benefits of embedding the teaching of writing into the curriculum have been advocated by educators and researchers. However, there is currently little evidence of embedded writing instruction in the UK’s higher education context. In this article, we present a case study in which we report the design, implementation and evaluation of an academic writing intervention with first-year undergraduate students in an applied linguistics programme. Our objectives were to try a combination of embedded instructional methods and provide an example that can be followed by lecturers across disciplines and institutions. Through the integration of in-class and online writing tasks and assessment feedback in a first-term module, we supported students’ writing development throughout the first term. We evaluated the effects of the intervention through the analysis of notes on classroom interaction, a student questionnaire and interviews, and a text analysis of students’ writing and the feedback comments over time. The e...
  • References (25)
  • Citations (65)
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References25
Newest
Published on Aug 25, 2015in Journal of Applied Linguistics
Theresa Lillis19
Estimated H-index: 19
(OU: Open University),
Mary Scott2
Estimated H-index: 2
(IOE: Institute of Education)
Academic literacies research has developed over the past 20 years as a significant field of study that draws on a number of disciplinary fields and subfields such as applied linguistics and sociolinguistics, anthropology, sociocultural theories of learning, new literacy studies and discourse studies. Whilst there is fluidity and even confusion surrounding the use of the term ‘academic literacies’, we argue in this paper that it is a field of enquiry with a specific epistemological and ideologica...
Published on Jul 1, 2008in Journal of English for Academic Purposes1.73
David Rose12
Estimated H-index: 12
(USYD: University of Sydney),
Miranda Rose21
Estimated H-index: 21
(USYD: University of Sydney)
+ 1 AuthorsSusan Page11
Estimated H-index: 11
(USYD: University of Sydney)
Abstract We report on an action research project that explored the use of an innovative pedagogy, known as Scaffolding Academic Literacy , to accelerate the learning of Indigenous undergraduate health science students at the University of Sydney. The pedagogy encompasses a set of teaching strategies that enable all students to read high level academic texts and successfully use what they learn from reading in their writing. The context of Indigenous adults entering tertiary study and their liter...
Published on Nov 1, 2006in Theory Into Practice1.35
Mary R. Lea20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Cambridge),
Brian Street31
Estimated H-index: 31
Although the term academic literacies was originally developed with regard to the study of literacies in higher education and the university, the concept also applies to K–12 education. An academic literacies perspective treats reading and writing as social practices that vary with context, culture, and genre (Barton & Hamilton, 1998; Street, 1984, 1995). The literacy practices of academic disciplines can be viewed as varied social practices associated with different communities. In addition, an...
Published on Oct 1, 2006in Teaching in Higher Education1.72
S. Bharuthram1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UJ: University of Johannesburg),
Sioux McKenna9
Estimated H-index: 9
This paper discusses the implementation of a project in which a writer–respondent intervention was used to develop the academic literacy practices of students. Writer–respondent projects are based on the idea that detailed developmental comments and questions on students’ draft writing can assist them in acquiring the peculiar norms of academic literacy. Respondents do not edit or correct students’ work, but provide students with an audience prepared to draw their attention to the academic norms...
Published on Oct 1, 2006in Teaching in Higher Education1.72
Ursula Wingate11
Estimated H-index: 11
('KCL': King's College London)
This paper argues that the widespread approach to enhancing student learning through separate study skills courses is ineffective, and that the term ‘study skills’ itself has misleading implications, which are counterproductive to learning. The main argument is that learning how to study effectively at university cannot be separated from subject content and the process of learning. The role of ‘study skills’ within universities’ skills frameworks, and as a component of students’ long-term develo...
Published on Jan 1, 2006
Rosalind Ivanic6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Mary R. Lea20
Estimated H-index: 20
About the book: Academic writing is emerging as a distinct subject for teaching and research in higher education. This book serves as an introduction to this new field and as a resource for university teachers, researchers, and administrators interested in developing students' writing.
Cited By65
Newest
Published on May 3, 2018in Journal of Further and Higher Education
S. Elliott (Bishop Grosseteste University), H. Hendry (Bishop Grosseteste University)+ 13 AuthorsN. Lilley (Bishop Grosseteste University)
Student difficulties with the transition to writing in higher education are well documented whether from a ‘study skills’, an ‘academic socialisation’ or an ‘academic literacies’ perspective. In order to more closely examine the challenges faced by students from widening participation backgrounds and diverse routes into undergraduate study, this project focuses on first year undergraduate experiences of developing academic literacies on an Education Studies programme at one university in England...
Published on Oct 30, 2017in Active Learning in Higher Education2.29
Stuart Wrigley , Stuart Wrigley (RHUL: Royal Holloway, University of London)
This article discusses and challenges the increasing use of plagiarism detection services such as Turnitin and Grammarly by students, arguing that the increasingly online nature of composition is having a profound effect on student composition processes. This dependence on the Internet is leading to a strategy I term ‘de-plagiarism’, in which students copy/paste text into their essays and then ‘cleanse’ the text to avoid plagiarism detection. I then argue that this is being done in the context o...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Linguistics and Education1.52
Maria Pia Gomez-Laich1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CMU: Carnegie Mellon University),
Maria Pia Gomez-Laich + 0 AuthorsSilvia Pessoa8
Estimated H-index: 8
Abstract We report on an interdisciplinary collaboration between writing professors with training in linguistics and a design professor at an English-medium university in the Middle East, where the majority of the students have English as an additional language. We briefly describe the iterative process of redesigning the writing assignments and designing writing workshops to make the design professor's expectations more explicit. We then investigate the impact of the explicit instruction and wr...
Published on Jan 1, 2019
Marion Heron1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Surrey),
David Palfreyman10
Estimated H-index: 10
(ZU: Zayed University)
Student voice and participation in dialogue are underpinned by and dependent upon students’ ability to use appropriate linguistic and non-linguistic resources. This holds true for students from diverse linguistic backgrounds in both Anglophone and non-Anglophone contexts, yet there is little exploration of the resources and tools students need to ensure a plurality of voices. This chapter draws on theoretical insights into the communicative features of student voice and the conceptual frameworks...
Published on Nov 17, 2018in Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education2.47
Åsa Eriksson5
Estimated H-index: 5
(KI: Karolinska Institutet),
Liselotte Maurex9
Estimated H-index: 9
(KI: Karolinska Institutet)
AbstractThis paper describes the teaching of psychological report writing at Karolinska Institutet and the efforts to improve it through the introduction of formative assessment applied as peer and teacher review. 48 fourth-year psychology students were required to write a psychological report. Half of the students also participated in a non-mandatory peer review of a first draft. All students handed in a preliminary version of the report, had it reviewed by the teachers and made alterations bef...
Published on Nov 14, 2018in Active Learning in Higher Education2.29
Marlies Schillings (UM: Maastricht University), Herma Roebertsen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UM: Maastricht University)
+ 1 AuthorsDiana Dolmans37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UM: Maastricht University)
Written feedback plays a key role in the acquisition of academic writing skills. Ideally, this feedback should include feed up, feed back and feed forward. However, written feedback alone is not enough to improve writing skills; students often struggle to interpret the feedback received and enhance their writing skills accordingly. Several studies have suggested that dialogue about written feedback is essential to promote the development of these skills. Yet, evidence of the effectiveness of fac...
Amanda French2
Estimated H-index: 2
(BCU: Birmingham City University)
ABSTRACT Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better (Samuel Beckett). [Quoted in ‘Samuel Beckett Talks About Beckett’ by John Gruen, in Vogue, (December 1969), p. 210.]. ‘Fail Better’ is an approach which supports first-year students’ successful transition to higher education academic writing practices. ‘Fail Better’ uses a broadly academic literacies model of development to address students’ failure and struggle with writing. Rather than blaming students for ‘poor wr...
Radhika Jaidev2
Estimated H-index: 2
(NUS: National University of Singapore),
Peggie Chan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NUS: National University of Singapore)
ABSTRACTEnglish is the medium of instruction in all Science and Engineering undergraduate programmes at the National University of Singapore (NUS). Therefore, students who do not meet minimum proficiency requirements are placed in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses to help them improve. Other generic, domain-specific and workplace communication courses are also offered as core courses or electives so that most students take at least one such course before they graduate. The strong focus...