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Using Friendship to Build Professional Family Work Relationships where Child Neglect is an Issue: Worker Perceptions

Published on Jul 3, 2014in Australian Social Work
· DOI :10.1080/0312407X.2013.815240
Elizabeth Claire Reimer4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SCU: Southern Cross University)
Abstract
AbstractEffective working relationships are those which are characterised by close personal contact, even friendship-like in nature, contained within professional boundaries. However, such personal ways of working remain a contentious aspect of professional relationships. Indeed, workers operating in this way commonly experience disapproval from colleagues. Guidance regarding how workers build personalised professional relationships while operating in a disapproving environment is limited. This is even more pronounced for building relationships with families where child neglect is an issue. This paper draws on a study of perceptions of eight parent–family worker relationship cases in New South Wales, Australia. The study utilised qualitative research methods to analyse and compare participants' perceptions of the experiences and meaning of working relationships with families where child neglect is an issue. The paper will explore how the workers' use of friendship-like characteristics to build highly pers...
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