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Sedentary lifestyle, poor cardiorespiratory fitness, and the metabolic syndrome

Published on Aug 1, 2003in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 4.29
· DOI :10.1249/01.MSS.0000079076.74931.9A
Timo A. Lakka78
Estimated H-index: 78
,
David E. Laaksonen54
Estimated H-index: 54
+ 4 AuthorsJukka T. Salonen15
Estimated H-index: 15
Abstract
ABSTRACTLAKKA, T. A., D. E. LAAKSONEN, H.-M. LAKKA, N. MANNIKKO, L. K. NISKANEN, R. RAURAMAA, and J. T. SALONEN. Sedentary Lifestyle, Poor Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and the Metabolic Syndrome. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 35, No. 8, pp. 1279–1286, 2003.PurposeThe cross-sectional associations of le
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  • Citations (343)
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References31
Newest
Published on Dec 4, 2002in JAMA 47.66
Hanna-Maaria Lakka26
Estimated H-index: 26
,
David E. Laaksonen54
Estimated H-index: 54
+ 4 AuthorsJukka T. Salonen25
Estimated H-index: 25
Results The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome ranged from 8.8% to 14.3%, depending on the definition. There were 109 deaths during the approximately 11.4year follow-up, of which 46 and 27 were due to CVD and CHD, respectively. Men with the metabolic syndrome as defined by the NCEP were 2.9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-7.2) to 4.2 (95% CI, 1.6-10.8) times more likely and, as defined by the WHO, 2.9 (95% CI, 1.2-6.8) to 3.3 (95% CI, 1.4-7.7) times more likely to die of CHD after adjustmen...
4,034 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2002in American Journal of Epidemiology 4.32
David E. Laaksonen54
Estimated H-index: 54
,
Hanna-Maaria Lakka26
Estimated H-index: 26
+ 3 AuthorsTimo A. Lakka78
Estimated H-index: 78
The World Health Organization (WHO) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) recently proposed definitions for the metabolic syndrome. Little is known of their validity, however. The authors assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the definitions of the metabolic syndrome for prevalent and incident diabetes mellitus in a Finnish population-based cohort of middle-aged men (n = 1,005) followed for 4 years since the late 1980s. Four definitions based on the WHO and NCEP recommendat...
791 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2002in Diabetes Care 13.40
David E. Laaksonen54
Estimated H-index: 54
,
Hanna-Maaria Lakka26
Estimated H-index: 26
+ 3 AuthorsTimo A. Lakka78
Estimated H-index: 78
OBJECTIVE —Little is known about the association of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and cardiorespiratory fitness with development of the metabolic syndrome, which predisposes diseases such as diabetes and atherosclerosis. We studied the associations of LTPA and cardiorespiratory fitness with development of the metabolic syndrome (World Health Organization [WHO] and the National Cholesterol Education Program [NCEP] definitions). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS —LTPA over the previous 12 months...
525 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 16, 2002in JAMA 47.66
Earl S. Ford110
Estimated H-index: 110
(American Medical Association),
Wayne H. Giles79
Estimated H-index: 79
(American Medical Association),
William H. Dietz97
Estimated H-index: 97
(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
ContextThe Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (ATP III) highlights the importance of treating patients with the metabolic syndrome to prevent cardiovascular disease. Limited information is available about the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in the United States, however.ObjectiveTo estimate the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in the United States as defined by the ATP III re...
5,803 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2001in Diabetes Care 13.40
Bo Isomaa46
Estimated H-index: 46
,
Peter Almgren63
Estimated H-index: 63
+ 5 AuthorsLeif Groop128
Estimated H-index: 128
OBJECTIVE —To estimate the prevalence of and the cardiovascular risk associated with the metabolic syndrome using the new definition proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS —A total of 4,483 subjects aged 35–70 years participating in a large family study of type 2 diabetes in Finland and Sweden (the Botnia study) were included in the analysis of cardiovascular risk associated with the metabolic syndrome. In subjects who had type 2 diabetes ( n = 1,697), impai...
3,813 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2001in American Journal of Epidemiology 4.32
Frank B. Hu202
Estimated H-index: 202
Sakkinen et al. (1) derived multiple factors of insulin resistance syndrome through factor analysis of 21 metabolic and hemostatic variables. They used orthogonal transformation (varimax rotation in SAS computer software) to rotate the factors in order to achieve clearer interpretability. Thus, the derived factors including body mass, insulin/ glucose, lipids, blood pressure, and so on are “uncorrelated.” While their approach is statistically sound, the logic is not consistent with the theory of...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 26, 2001in JAMA Internal Medicine 19.99
Jari A. Laukkanen34
Estimated H-index: 34
,
Timo A. Lakka78
Estimated H-index: 78
+ 4 AuthorsJukka T. Salonen15
Estimated H-index: 15
Objective: To examine the relations of cardiorespiratory fitness, as measured by maximal oxygen uptake and exercise test duration at the initiation of the study, with overall, cardiovascular disease (CVD)‐related, and non‐ CVD-related mortality. Methods: A population-based cohort study of 1294 men with no CVD, pulmonary disease, or cancer at baseline in Kuopio and surrounding communities in eastern Finland. During an average follow-up of 10.7 years, there were 124 overall, 42 CVD-related, and 82...
229 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 2, 2001in Annals of Internal Medicine 19.38
Timo A. Lakka78
Estimated H-index: 78
,
Jari A. Laukkanen34
Estimated H-index: 34
+ 4 AuthorsJukka T. Salonen15
Estimated H-index: 15
Background: Good cardiorespiratory fitness has been associated with reduced risk for clinical events of atherosclerotic vascular diseases, but whether it is related to slower progression of early atherosclerosis is unclear. Objective: To study the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and the progression of early carotid atherosclerosis. Design: 4-year follow-up study. Setting: Eastern Finland. Participants: Population-based sample of 854 men 42 to 60 years of age. Measurements: Maximal ...
138 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2000in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 4.29
Sean Carroll14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Leeds Beckett University),
Carlton Cooke17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Leeds Trinity University),
R. J. Butterly10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Leeds Beckett University)
CARROLL, S., C. B. COOKE and R. J. BUTTERLY. Metabolic clustering, physical activity and fitness in nonsmoking, middle-aged men. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 32, No. 12, 2000, pp. 2079–2086. The relationship of both physical activity and predicted maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) with the clustering of metabolic risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome (MS) was examined within 711 employed middle-aged (46.9 ± 7.8 yr) men. Metabolic markers included fasting glucose, triglycerides, ...
86 Citations Source Cite
Cited By343
Newest
Mathias F. Brobakken (Norwegian University of Science and Technology), Mona Nygård2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
+ 6 AuthorsEivind Wang10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Molde University College)
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Published on Mar 27, 2019in International Journal of Molecular Sciences 3.69
Matthew P. Krause13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Kevin J. Milne9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Thomas J. Hawke26
Estimated H-index: 26
Adiponectin regulates metabolism through blood glucose control and fatty acid oxidation, partly mediated by downstream effects of adiponectin signaling in skeletal muscle. More recently, skeletal muscle has been identified as a source of adiponectin expression, fueling interest in the role of adiponectin as both a circulating adipokine and a locally expressed paracrine/autocrine factor. In addition to being metabolically responsive, skeletal muscle functional capacity, calcium handling, growth a...
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Pervasive and Mobile Computing 2.97
Heng Zhang (Southwest University), Jan Smeddinck (International Computer Science Institute)+ 5 AuthorsMichael Lawo10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Bremen)
Abstract The prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle is a major contributor to many chronic afflictions in modern society. Objective study and monitoring to gain an accurate understanding of situated sedentary behavior, for example when at home, present considerable challenges, e.g. regarding ecological validity. Non-intrusive monitoring based on Wi-Fi signals provides a new way to gain insights into populations that are at risk of the negative effects of a sedentary lifestyle, or who are already in...
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Published on Feb 1, 2019in Calcified Tissue International 3.29
Sobhy M. Yakout15
Estimated H-index: 15
(King Saud University),
Shaea A. Alkahtani4
Estimated H-index: 4
(King Saud University)
+ 6 AuthorsNasser M. Al-Daghri33
Estimated H-index: 33
(King Saud University)
Objective The present single-center observational study determined the prevalence and coexistence of sarcopenia, pre-sarcopenia, and metabolic syndrome (MetS) among apparently healthy Arab men and whether having both conditions present a unique cardiometabolic profile that is distinct than having the conditions separately.
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2019in American Journal of Human Biology 1.57
Jerry C Lee (University of Cambridge), Kathryn Louise Westgate7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Cambridge)
+ 6 AuthorsSoren Brage64
Estimated H-index: 64
(University of Cambridge)
This research was supported by DANIDA (J. no. 104.DAN.8-871, RUF project no. 91202), the Welcome Trust, the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit (MC_UU_12015/3), the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre Cambridge [IS-BRC-1215-20014], the Gates Cambridge Trust, Cluster of International Health (University of Copenhagen), Steno Diabetes Centre, Beckett Foundation, Dagmar Marshall Foundation, Dr Thorvald Madsen’s Grant, Kong Christian den Tiende’s Foundation, and Brdr Hartmann Foundation. We thank ...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019
Eric S. Nylen33
Estimated H-index: 33
(George Washington University),
Shruti M. Gandhi1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
M. Raj Lakshman16
Estimated H-index: 16
(George Washington University)
The metabolic syndrome (MS) consists of a cluster of health risk factors where the proximal cause(s) include abnormal insulin signaling and dysfunctional adipose fuel metabolism. There is strong evidence that cardiorespiratory fitness interacts directly with MS expression such that low cardiorespiratory fitness itself has been proposed as a novel component of MS. Lifestyle measures that promote physical fitness can prevent the debut of MS and can reverse the presence of an established MS. Moreov...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Preventive Medicine 3.48
Ricardo Ortega1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Gonzalo Grandes17
Estimated H-index: 17
+ 2 AuthorsJesús Torcal6
Estimated H-index: 6
Abstract Both, cardiorespiratory fitness and abdominal obesity are independently associated with developing cardiovascular disease and its risk factors. However, the relationship between both attributes is unclear. We examine the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness and the risk of developing abdominal obesity, and secondarily, other adiposity measures. Retrospective observational study of a cohort of 1284 sedentary patients, who had participated in a clinical trial of physical activit...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in BJUI 4.69
Sangjun Yoo6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Seoul National University),
Sohee Oh11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Seoul National University)
+ 4 AuthorsHwancheolSon17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Seoul National University)
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome 2.41
Basma Damiri3
Estimated H-index: 3
(An-Najah National University),
Mohammed S. Abualsoud (An-Najah National University)+ 1 AuthorsSakhaa K. Salameh (An-Najah National University)
Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is one of the main reasons for elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. Obese and overweight individuals are at high risk of developing these chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to characterize and establish sex-adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components.
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