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Minimal versus umbilical waist circumference measures as indicators of cardiovascular disease risk.

Published on Mar 1, 2007in Obesity3.97
· DOI :10.1038/oby.2007.612
Leslie H. Willis9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Duke University),
Cris A. Slentz35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Duke University)
+ 4 AuthorsWilliam E. Kraus76
Estimated H-index: 76
(Duke University)
Cite
Abstract
WILLIS, LESLIE H., CRIS A. SLENTZ, JOSEPH A. HOUMARD, JOHANNA L. JOHNSON, BRIAN D. DUSCHA, LORI B. AIKEN, AND WILLIAM E. KRAUS. Minimal versus umbilical waist circumference measures as indicators of cardiovascular disease risk. Obesity. 2007;15: 753–759. Objective: Measures of central obesity are strongly correlated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Although waist circumference (WC) is a commonly used measure of central obesity, there is no standard measurement location. We examined two WC locations to determine which was more highly correlated with CVD risk factors and metabolic syndrome (MS). Research Methods and Procedures: WC measures were taken on 266 sedentary, overweight men and women 45 to 60 years old. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests, fasting plasma lipid analysis, and computed tomography scans were conducted. Correlational analyses followed by the Test for Equal Correlations determined whether one WC measure better correlated with the cardiovascular risk factors. Results: In women, minimal waist had higher correlation coefficients than umbilical waist for all eight variables presented. High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein particle size, and MS score were significantly correlated with minimal waist, but not umbilical waist. For high-density lipoprotein size and insulin sensitivity, minimal waist was a better correlate, although the difference between waist measures only approached statistical significance (p 0.06). In men, minimal waist had a higher correlation coefficient than umbilical waist for insulin sensitivity, fasting insulin, and visceral adipose tissue. Additionally, minimal waist was significantly correlated with MS in men and umbilical waist was not. For both genders, minimal waist was more highly correlated with visceral adipose tissue than umbilical waist. Discussion: For every metabolic variable presented, minimal WC was more highly correlated with CVD risk than was umbilical WC in women. The data for women indicate that WC location is important when determining CVD risk. In men, minimal waist was better, although the data were less compelling.
  • References (24)
  • Citations (53)
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References24
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2004in Obesity Research
G. Neil Thomas35
Estimated H-index: 35
(HKU: University of Hong Kong),
Sai Yin Ho35
Estimated H-index: 35
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
+ 3 AuthorsTai Hing Lam68
Estimated H-index: 68
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
Objective: Body fat distribution has been reported to differentially contribute to the development of cardiovascular risk. We report the relative associations between general and central obesity and risk factors in 2893 Chinese subjects recruited from the Hong Kong population. Research Methods and Procedures: Anthropometric parameters [waist circumference (WC) and BMI], surrogate measures of insulin resistance (fasting plasma glucose and insulin, oral glucose tolerance test, 2 hours glucose and ...
Published on Oct 1, 2004in Atherosclerosis4.25
Johanna L. Johnson14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Duke University),
Cris A. Slentz35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Duke University)
+ 4 AuthorsWilliam E. Kraus76
Estimated H-index: 76
(Duke University)
Recent research has focused on the potential atherogenicity of various lipoprotein subclasses and their link to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. This investigation seeks to identify differences in lipoprotein subclass distributions among a biracial, middle-aged population, while controlling for a number of confounding risk factors. Fasting plasma samples were analyzed in 285 sedentary, mildly dyslipidemic, overweight individuals between 40 and 65 years with no known history of CHD or diabetes....
Published on Aug 1, 2004in International Journal of Obesity4.51
Altan Onat42
Estimated H-index: 42
,
Günsel Ş. Avcı3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 3 AuthorsVedat Sansoy23
Estimated H-index: 23
Measures of abdominal obesity assessed for visceral adiposity and relation to coronary risk
Published on Mar 1, 2004in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition6.57
JanssenIan65
Estimated H-index: 65
(Queen's University),
Peter T. Katzmarzyk81
Estimated H-index: 81
(Queen's University),
Robert Ross47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Queen's University)
Background: The addition of waist circumference (WC) to body mass index (BMI; in kg/m 2 ) predicts a greater variance in health risk than does BMI alone; however, whether the reverse is true is not known. Objective: We evaluated whether BMI adds to the predictive power of WC in assessing obesity-related comorbidity. Design: Subjects were 14 924 adult participants in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, grouped into categories of BMI and WC in accordance with the National I...
Published on Jan 19, 2004in Circulation23.05
Scott M. Grundy167
Estimated H-index: 167
,
H. Bryan Brewer67
Estimated H-index: 67
+ 2 AuthorsClaude Lenfant14
Estimated H-index: 14
The National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel III report (ATP III)1 identified the metabolic syndrome as a multiplex risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that is deserving of more clinical attention. The cardiovascular community has responded with heightened awareness and interest. ATP III criteria for metabolic syndrome differ somewhat from those of other organizations. Consequently, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, in collaboration with the American H...
Published on Jan 12, 2004in JAMA Internal Medicine20.77
Cris A. Slentz35
Estimated H-index: 35
,
Brian D. Duscha28
Estimated H-index: 28
+ 6 AuthorsWilliam E. Kraus76
Estimated H-index: 76
Background Obesity is a major health problem due, in part, to physical inactivity. The amount of activity needed to prevent weight gain is unknown. Objective To determine the effects of different amounts and intensities of exercise training. Design Randomized controlled trial (February 1999–July 2002). Setting and Participants Sedentary, overweight men and women (aged 40-65 years) with mild to moderate dyslipidemia were recruited from Durham, NC, and surrounding communities. Interventions Eight-...
Published on Jan 1, 2004in Journal of Applied Physiology3.14
Joseph A. Houmard57
Estimated H-index: 57
,
Charles J. Tanner26
Estimated H-index: 26
+ 3 AuthorsWilliam E. Kraus76
Estimated H-index: 76
Physical activity enhances insulin action in obese/overweight individuals. However, the exercise prescription required for the optimal enhancement is not known. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that exercise training consisting of vigorous-intensity activity would enhance insulin sensitivity more substantially than moderate-intensity activity. Sedentary, overweight/obese subjects (n = 154) were randomly assigned to either control or an exercise group for 6 mo: 1) low-volume/m...
Published on Mar 1, 2003in Diabetes Care15.27
Earl S. Ford110
Estimated H-index: 110
,
Wayne H. Giles79
Estimated H-index: 79
OBJECTIVE —To compare the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome using two definitions: one proposed by the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III [ATP III]) and one by the World Health Organization (WHO). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS —We used data from a nationally representative sample of the noninstitutionalized civilian population of the U.S. from the Third Nat...
Published on Feb 1, 2003in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition6.57
Jingsong Wang75
Estimated H-index: 75
(Columbia University),
John Thornton52
Estimated H-index: 52
(Columbia University)
+ 9 AuthorsLaurel Mayer22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Columbia University)
Background: Waist circumference (WC) is now accepted as a practical measure of adipose tissue distribution. Four body sites for WC measurements are commonly used, as follows: immediately below the lowest ribs (WC1), the narrowest waist (WC2), the midpoint between the lowest rib and the iliac crest (WC3), and immediately above the iliac crest (WC4). Objective: We sought to compare the magnitude and reliability of WC measured at these 4 sites in males and females. Design: WC was measured at each s...
Cited By53
Newest
Published on Apr 16, 2019in Frontiers in Physiology3.20
Johanna L. Johnson14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Duke University),
Cris A. Slentz35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Duke University)
+ 2 AuthorsWilliam E. Kraus76
Estimated H-index: 76
(Duke University)
Background: STRRIDE (Studies Targeting Risk Reduction Interventions through Defined Exercise) was an eight-month exercise study conducted from 1998-2003. Subjects were randomized to control or one of three exercise groups differing in intensity and amount. To determine if there were legacy effects, we invited 161 individuals who completed the intervention phase to return for a 10-year Reunion study. Methods: Subjects completed medical history and physical activity questionnaires. Height, body we...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases3.34
Z. Esmaeilinezhad1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Shiraz University of Medical Sciences),
S. Babajafari1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Shiraz University of Medical Sciences)
+ 3 AuthorsR. Barati-Boldaji1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Shiraz University of Medical Sciences)
Abstract Background and Aims Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome is a common reproductive, endocrine, and metabolic disease in women. Pomegranate juice, known as a rich source of phytochemicals with high antioxidant activity, enriched with probiotic may improve PCOS. Methods and Results A randomized, controlled, triple-blinded, parallel trial study was performed in PCOS patients (n = 92). Three treatment groups (23 patients each) received 2 L of synbiotic pomegranate juice (SPJ), pomegranate juice (PJ),...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nutrition Journal3.59
Carol S. Johnston32
Estimated H-index: 32
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Courtney D. Bliss1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsCameron Scholtz (ASU: Arizona State University)
The Healthy Eating Index-2010 is a measure of diet quality as portrayed by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans; however, computing the Healthy Eating Index score is time consuming and requires trained personnel. The Rapid Eating Assessment for Participants [shortened version] is a simple measure that quickly, in less than 10 min, assesses diet quality in a clinical or research setting. This research evaluated the degree of correlation between these two methods of scoring diet quality, as well a...
Published on Feb 20, 2018in Nutrients4.17
Radhika V. Seimon14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Anthony L. Wild-Taylor1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 12 AuthorsNathan A. Johnson24
Estimated H-index: 24
With obesity being a leading cause of preventable death, it is vital to understand how best to identify individuals with greater risk of metabolic disease, especially those with high visceral adipose tissue (VAT). This study aimed to determine whether three commonly used waist circumference (WC) measurement sites could provide accurate estimations of VAT, as determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is a gold standard for measuring VAT, in postmenopausal women with obesity. VAT volum...
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Clinical obesity
Ruth E. Brown8
Estimated H-index: 8
(York University),
A. K. Randhawa1
Estimated H-index: 1
(York University)
+ 4 AuthorsJennifer L. Kuk29
Estimated H-index: 29
(York University)
Published on Nov 29, 2017in Frontiers in Physiology3.20
Jiajia Jiang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Capital Medical University),
Jia Cui1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Chinese PLA General Hospital)
+ 7 AuthorsYan He7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Capital Medical University)
Background: Waist circumference has been correlated with the risk of hyperuricemia. Whether neck circumference is also associated with hyperuricemia has not been assessed. This study aimed to investigate whether neck circumference is associated with hyperuricemia. Methods: This study population from Beijing is part of the larger China-wide Risk Evaluation of Cancers in Chinese Diabetic Individuals: a lONgitudinal (REACTION) study. For this Beijing sub-center cross-sectional study, a total of 897...
Published on Jan 2, 2017in Endocrine Research1.63
Yavor Assyov4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Antoaneta Gateva6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 1 AuthorsZdravko Kamenov9
Estimated H-index: 9
ABSTRACTPurpose/Aim: Neck circumference (NC) is an emerging anthropometric parameter that has been proposed to reflect metabolic health. The aim of the current study was to compare its clinical usefulness to waist circumference (WC) in the assessment of individuals with severe obesity. Materials and methods: A total of 255 subjects participated in the study. All anthropometric measurements were done by a single medical professional. Biochemical measurements included oral glucose-tolerance tests ...
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases3.34
A. Formisano5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Karin Bammann28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Bremen)
+ 10 AuthorsK. Van den Bussche2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UGent: Ghent University)
Abstract Background and aims Several studies demonstrated that larger neck circumference (NC) in children and adolescents may help to identify obesity and cardio-metabolic abnormalities. We aimed to evaluate the correlation between NC and metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors and to determine the utility of this anthropometric index to identify MetS in European children. Methods and results The present cross-sectional analysis includes 15,673 children (3–10 years) participating in the IDEFICS s...
Published on Apr 2, 2016in British Journal of Cardiac Nursing
Wendan Shi1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Lis Neubeck18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Robyn Gallagher21
Estimated H-index: 21
Obesity-related chronic illness is an international health issue. Waist circumference can assess central adiposity, which is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease and type two diabetes mellitus. Aim: This study evaluates the effectiveness of waist circumference in comparison to body mass index as measured at different locations in adults with cardiovascular disease or type two diabetes mellitus, and responsiveness of these measures to weight change. Results: All measures were significa...
Published on Aug 1, 2015in Nutrition in Clinical Practice2.59
Nuno M. Pimenta6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Lisbon),
Helena Santa-Clara10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Lisbon)
+ 3 AuthorsLuís B. Sardinha53
Estimated H-index: 53
(University of Lisbon)
Background: Central fat accumulation is important in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) etiology. It is unknown whether any commonly used waist circumference measurement protocol (WCmp), as a whole and central fat accumulation marker, is preferable for patients with NAFLD. The present study sought to find a preferable WCmp to be used in patients with NAFLD, based on 3-fold criteria. Methods: Body fat (BF) was assessed through dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in 28 patients with NAFLD (19 m...